Hot answers tagged

21

"Harden up", "come on", "toughen up", "get it together", "just do it", and "let's go" can all be slotted into the same purpose. One could even reach for "osu". I find the gist of the phrase comes more from elements other than word choice, such as volume, sharpness of tone, or accompanying the phrase with a loud clap.


9

Someone who is "rooted" to the ground is difficult to move or control and can use this property to move and control others more easily. It's all about body structure. Here is a video of a short demonstration of being rooted. Uprooting someone is when you break their connection to the ground or the structure that connects them to the ground so that they ...


9

The short form of the answer is that it is entirely dependent on the organization and its standards and customs. For the longer answer, start by looking at the way the word "master" is used in English and notice that it has several meanings that are only loosely related. "Master" can mean "teacher", it can mean "lord" especially when referring to the "...


8

It's hard to tell, but it looks like the dude on the right's left arm is pushed up behind his back. I hear that called that a "chicken wing", which is similar to BJJ's "Kimura", catch-wrestling's double wrist lock, and judo's ude garami. I'm sure there's a name for it in SAMBO, and aikido too. I say "similar to" because most of those techniques actually ...


8

I totally agree on the pedantry stuff, and i think that it is really depending on what each person thinks about it. For me, a kind of Martial Art has a tradition, a specific form or style or is following certain rules. I believe that there is also some kind of beauty in those 'Arts'... I personally would even go further and divide Martial Arts and Combat ...


7

Being rooted means having a stable center of gravity (CoG). Uprooting someone means to go under their CoG and take control of it. Once that is done, defeat, throw, project, lift are just possible courses to follow. This answer to a question about a seated Daito-Ryu technique makes allusion to it even by the wording used - the teacher takes control of the ...


7

Similar to Sardathrion's answer the definition on Wikipedia is Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, entertainment, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development. I and several members of the MA project there ...


7

Since you are already using Japanese terms, may I suggest: 頑張れ -- ganbare! Which translates as "Do Your Best!"


6

This is a nothing lock - it is a made for television move. While Sherlock's thumb and index finger do lie along anterior wrist points used frequently with various wrist locks or throws (e.g. kotogaeshi in Aikido), this particular implementation is a waste of bandwidth and screen frames, it is a British version of Hollywood nonsense. Try it, and see how ...


6

The names will depend on your style. For example, oshi taoshi is called both ikkyo and ikajo but refers to the same technique. You should try to get hold of your syllabus in romaji (the Roman alphabet transcript) as this will telly you the minimum you have to learn. The rest is just flavour. The aiki web and the Aikido FAQ both have a glossary of common ...


6

Have fun with this list: http://www.ne.jp/asahi/dji/home/aikilex/ This is a tool for people who want to gain greater insight into the vocabulary of the art of aikido. Its purpose is not to offer authoritative definitions of the many terms we use in the dojo, but rather simply to list, in Japanese and romanized script, the words and word fragments ...


6

The Oxford dictionary defines martial art as Various sports, which originated chiefly in Japan, Korea, and China as forms of self-defence or attack, such as judo, karate, and kendo. Merriam Webster defines martial art as any one of several forms of fighting and self-defense (such as karate and judo) that are widely practiced as sports And ...


5

If you look at the forms tag you'll notice it's description is a sequence of movements traditionally used in the practice and performance of a martial art. An important word here is 'traditionally'. A form is not only a method to teach and learn a particular technique, it has also been used to preserve and pass on a proven technique in a formal and ...


5

The world of martial arts is far too varied - both geographically and culturally - for there to be a one-size-fits-all answer to this. Some places use the term (or a similar term in the local language) for the 'head' instructors, others only for a specific rank and above (such as 5th dan), others use 'master' for all black belts, others dont use it at all. ...


5

My understanding is that the use of the word "master"–as it tends to get used by US practitioners in US schools–is generally a European/US thing that started when these arts got imported after WWII, and one that varies heavily by style. Japanese systems, at least, tend to just use the term "Sensei" (先生). Some systems may use another term for extremely well ...


4

I don't believe your "advanced basics" are a set of techniques, but rather an application of a hapkido principle called Hwa (화), which is a principle of non-resistance, to your fundamentals (kibon sool). This can be thought of as similar to applying the "joining" principle in aikido or aikijujutsu, in that when the opponent pushes, you move in the direction ...


4

This answer is in reply to @Dave Liepmann's query, and is in support of Trevoke's answer. No need to upvote this one. Dave Liepmann asked, "So, unbalancing and locking, or unbalancing or locking?" This is a common way to frame this concept. When your body has not learned this stuff, your mind wants to put this into neat boxes because the underlying ...


4

A form or kata is a set sequence of moves, always performed the same way. Obviously you can also have a sequence (or combination) of moves that are not a form/kata, however in my (limited) travels I have never heard the word sequence used as a formal noun for anything in any style (I've only heard it used as an adjective). However there are literally ...


4

If we're talking umbrella terms, I tend to think of martial arts as anything that is a codified system of movement which currently, or has roots in the past, of being used for combat. This covers everything from currently combative focused methods, to sports, to cultural practices. There's a lot of waving around "true martial arts" but I think it's totally ...


4

I'm not aware of a suitable term that has wide acceptance yet, but there seems to be a lot of discussion on this issue at present (in a wider context than Martial Arts). Recently, on Twitter, the term "Fortify!" has been suggested for this situation.


4

TL;DR I'm recommending "Step Up" as a replacement phrase. The other phrases I include are contextual, and some do not have the exact intent of "Man up". I kinda got carried away with phrases that might fit in the same slot as "Man up". For clarity, I understand "Man up" to mean that the person needs to recognize that their barriers are mental and do what ...


4

How about "Fight it" or "Fight Through" something like that? It's positive and active, non gendered, and implies an opponent (their own fear etc) that can be beaten. Push Through would work too, often already used in medical settings re pain. Also an honest talk with the women in the group, they may have suggestions.


4

Gut up. I heard Alex Jones use it once.


3

They can be called 'kali sticks', 'arnis sticks', 'baston', etc. Just insert arnis style sticks is ok. Or even just 'arnis'. There's diff. styles of arnis and the term depends on which style you're referring too. There are also diff. material for the sticks themselves. People usually just get whatever you refer to :)


3

The confusion here stems from the fact that the traditional Chinese way of thinking does not make as clear a distinction between the spirit and the physical body. "Chi" is a combination of concentration and body mechanics. In Western terms, it can be described as performing a movement in the correct way, without unnecessary movements, and applying proper ...


3

If I understand what you are asking I would say : The closest I can think of and what we use in Tang Soo Do a (Korean martial art); we refer to the Neh Gong, Weh Gong and Shim Gong. It does have different translations depending on it's use but you can think of this as the External Power, Internal Power and Spirit/Mind. When referring to it in the way of ...


2

There is also a small reference work called "Aikido Terminology: An essential reference tool in both English and Japanese." The book has very thorough explanation of the language -- with things grouped usefully, (e.g. "stances", "etiquette", etc). It very clearly explains the words in English and Japanese including pronunciation.


2

This question is specifically about uprooting in tai chi chuan. "All strength comes from the ground". Your CoG is less important than your peng path or ground strength vector. As I said in other posts it's not a mystical experience it's a mechanical process - see for example the articles here http://ismag.iay.org.uk/. To uproot someone means to disrupt ...


2

If there's no winner, it's a tie. Depending on the style, there might be an extra round or sudden death, or the officials may get technical and look at points from the current and previous matches to determine the winner. In some instances, like when the match was the final round of the competition, the officials may decide to award both fighters 1st place, ...



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