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9

The short form of the answer is that it is entirely dependent on the organization and its standards and customs. For the longer answer, start by looking at the way the word "master" is used in English and notice that it has several meanings that are only loosely related. "Master" can mean "teacher", it can mean "lord" especially when referring to the ...


8

Someone who is "rooted" to the ground is difficult to move or control and can use this property to move and control others more easily. It's all about body structure. Here is a video of a short demonstration of being rooted. Uprooting someone is when you break their connection to the ground or the structure that connects them to the ground so that they ...


8

It's hard to tell, but it looks like the dude on the right's left arm is pushed up behind his back. I hear that called that a "chicken wing", which is similar to BJJ's "Kimura", catch-wrestling's double wrist lock, and judo's ude garami. I'm sure there's a name for it in SAMBO, and aikido too. I say "similar to" because most of those techniques actually ...


6

This is a nothing lock - it is a made for television move. While Sherlock's thumb and index finger do lie along anterior wrist points used frequently with various wrist locks or throws (e.g. kotogaeshi in Aikido), this particular implementation is a waste of bandwidth and screen frames, it is a British version of Hollywood nonsense. Try it, and see how ...


6

Being rooted means having a stable center of gravity (CoG). Uprooting someone means to go under their CoG and take control of it. Once that is done, defeat, throw, project, lift are just possible courses to follow. This answer to a question about a seated Daito-Ryu technique makes allusion to it even by the wording used - the teacher takes control of the ...


6

The names will depend on your style. For example, oshi taoshi is called both ikkyo and ikajo but refers to the same technique. You should try to get hold of your syllabus in romaji (the Roman alphabet transcript) as this will telly you the minimum you have to learn. The rest is just flavour. The aiki web and the Aikido FAQ both have a glossary of common ...


5

If you look at the forms tag you'll notice it's description is a sequence of movements traditionally used in the practice and performance of a martial art. An important word here is 'traditionally'. A form is not only a method to teach and learn a particular technique, it has also been used to preserve and pass on a proven technique in a formal and ...


5

Have fun with this list: http://www.ne.jp/asahi/dji/home/aikilex/ This is a tool for people who want to gain greater insight into the vocabulary of the art of aikido. Its purpose is not to offer authoritative definitions of the many terms we use in the dojo, but rather simply to list, in Japanese and romanized script, the words and word fragments ...


5

The world of martial arts is far too varied - both geographically and culturally - for there to be a one-size-fits-all answer to this. Some places use the term (or a similar term in the local language) for the 'head' instructors, others only for a specific rank and above (such as 5th dan), others use 'master' for all black belts, others dont use it at all. ...


5

My understanding is that the use of the word "master"–as it tends to get used by US practitioners in US schools–is generally a European/US thing that started when these arts got imported after WWII, and one that varies heavily by style. Japanese systems, at least, tend to just use the term "Sensei" (先生). Some systems may use another term for extremely well ...


4

I don't believe your "advanced basics" are a set of techniques, but rather an application of a hapkido principle called Hwa (화), which is a principle of non-resistance, to your fundamentals (kibon sool). This can be thought of as similar to applying the "joining" principle in aikido or aikijujutsu, in that when the opponent pushes, you move in the direction ...


4

This answer is in reply to @Dave Liepmann's query, and is in support of Trevoke's answer. No need to upvote this one. Dave Liepmann asked, "So, unbalancing and locking, or unbalancing or locking?" This is a common way to frame this concept. When your body has not learned this stuff, your mind wants to put this into neat boxes because the underlying ...


4

A form or kata is a set sequence of moves, always performed the same way. Obviously you can also have a sequence (or combination) of moves that are not a form/kata, however in my (limited) travels I have never heard the word sequence used as a formal noun for anything in any style (I've only heard it used as an adjective). However there are literally ...


3

If I understand what you are asking I would say : The closest I can think of and what we use in Tang Soo Do a (Korean martial art); we refer to the Neh Gong, Weh Gong and Shim Gong. It does have different translations depending on it's use but you can think of this as the External Power, Internal Power and Spirit/Mind. When referring to it in the way of ...


3

They can be called 'kali sticks', 'arnis sticks', 'baston', etc. Just insert arnis style sticks is ok. Or even just 'arnis'. There's diff. styles of arnis and the term depends on which style you're referring too. There are also diff. material for the sticks themselves. People usually just get whatever you refer to :)


3

The confusion here stems from the fact that the traditional Chinese way of thinking does not make as clear a distinction between the spirit and the physical body. "Chi" is a combination of concentration and body mechanics. In Western terms, it can be described as performing a movement in the correct way, without unnecessary movements, and applying proper ...


2

If there's no winner, it's a tie. Depending on the style, there might be an extra round or sudden death, or the officials may get technical and look at points from the current and previous matches to determine the winner. In some instances, like when the match was the final round of the competition, the officials may decide to award both fighters 1st place, ...


2

There's no worldwide definition for master or grandmaster. Some schools or lineages might apply it if you've been at a certain rank for X number of years, or if you can complete certain tasks or tests... outside of that, it's pretty much what anyone chooses to call themselves or others choose to call them. In my own personal view, someone who has good ...


2

Ain't nobody my master. For sure ain't nobody my grandmaster. I've got sensei, I've got coaches. Those are personal relationships with reciprocal obligations of their own, and I choose them. But the idea of a man having a master is outdated feudal* bullpuckey. Similarly, my coaches have coaches, and sometimes they teach me. In that case they're my coach, and ...


1

In Taekwon-do, a Grandmaster is a practitioner who has attained the rank of 9th Degree Black Belt (also known as 9th Dan, for some). He is called the "Sasung-nim". A Master is one who is 7th or 8th Degree Black Belt. Ranks below that are commonly known as "Sabum-nim" (Instructor) or "Boo-Sabum-nim" (Asst. Instructor). Whether or not a person should be ...


1

In Kukki-Taekwondo (WTF) the definition varies. Officially the Kukkiwon doesn't award Grandmaster titles. Most people generally assume that 8th Dan Kukkiwon and upward is Grandmaster - the Kukkiwon staff will frequently refer to 8th Dans as Grandmaster, but often slip to Master. I asked my contact at Changmookwan HQ in Korea to ask the head of ...


1

In my art Tang Soo Do, we have Gups (colored belt, or beginning students), Dans ("black belts"), Ko Sa Nim (Instructor, generally about 2nd degree) Sa Bom Nims (Master instructor, 4th degree +). Grandmasters (8 degree +), Kwan Jang Nim (Is the head of the federation or the master of all the masters in a given group of schools for example WTSDF Word Tang Soo ...


1

Generally speaking, a grandmaster is someone who has attained the top rank in a martial art. In some, the title is reserved for those who have received an honorary rank due to their commitment to the sport. To look at it from an academic perspective, a grandmaster would be a professor with a PHD or an honorary doctorate.


1

It is just a stick. A piece of rattan. I heard someone refer to the sticks as arnis but I don't think they have any specific name. And it makes sense from a historical point of view as it was just a stick to train with in times when carrying the sword (or any other sword-like weapon) was prohibited.


1

FMA terminology Baston is one name for stick. There are others. This Wikipedia Article states that Garrote (spanish meaning "club") is sometimes used.


1

Muay Thai moves list with links for pictures and demos. You could even contribute to update. http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/muay-thai-techniques


1

This question is specifically about uprooting in tai chi chuan. "All strength comes from the ground". Your CoG is less important than your peng path or ground strength vector. As I said in other posts it's not a mystical experience it's a mechanical process - see for example the articles here http://ismag.iay.org.uk/. To uproot someone means to disrupt ...


1

There is also a small reference work called "Aikido Terminology: An essential reference tool in both English and Japanese." The book has very thorough explanation of the language -- with things grouped usefully, (e.g. "stances", "etiquette", etc). It very clearly explains the words in English and Japanese including pronunciation.


1

I think this varies among different place. I just provide the situation of where I train. I train taekwondo in Hong Kong. My master is a Korean, so I guess this is quite a traditional way. In my school there is only one master 師父 (師=teacher, 父=father) and all of us are his students. All of us call him master. For those who teach, we call them 師兄/師姐 ...



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