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7

Someone who is "rooted" to the ground is difficult to move or control and can use this property to move and control others more easily. It's all about body structure. Here is a video of a short demonstration of being rooted. Uprooting someone is when you break their connection to the ground or the structure that connects them to the ground so that they ...


6

Being rooted means having a stable center of gravity (CoG). Uprooting someone means to go under their CoG and take control of it. Once that is done, defeat, throw, project, lift are just possible courses to follow. This answer to a question about a seated Daito-Ryu technique makes allusion to it even by the wording used - the teacher takes control of the ...


6

The names will depend on your style. For example, oshi taoshi is called both ikkyo and ikajo but refers to the same technique. You should try to get hold of your syllabus in romaji (the Roman alphabet transcript) as this will telly you the minimum you have to learn. The rest is just flavour. The aiki web and the Aikido FAQ both have a glossary of common ...


5

Have fun with this list: http://www.ne.jp/asahi/dji/home/aikilex/ This is a tool for people who want to gain greater insight into the vocabulary of the art of aikido. Its purpose is not to offer authoritative definitions of the many terms we use in the dojo, but rather simply to list, in Japanese and romanized script, the words and word fragments ...


5

The world of martial arts is far too varied - both geographically and culturally - for there to be a one-size-fits-all answer to this. Some places use the term (or a similar term in the local language) for the 'head' instructors, others only for a specific rank and above (such as 5th dan), others use 'master' for all black belts, others dont use it at all. ...


5

My understanding is that the use of the word "master"–as it tends to get used by US practitioners in US schools–is generally a European/US thing that started when these arts got imported after WWII, and one that varies heavily by style. Japanese systems, at least, tend to just use the term "Sensei" (先生). Some systems may use another term for extremely well ...


4

If you look at the forms tag you'll notice it's description is a sequence of movements traditionally used in the practice and performance of a martial art. An important word here is 'traditionally'. A form is not only a method to teach and learn a particular technique, it has also been used to preserve and pass on a proven technique in a formal and ...


4

A form or kata is a set sequence of moves, always performed the same way. Obviously you can also have a sequence (or combination) of moves that are not a form/kata, however in my (limited) travels I have never heard the word sequence used as a formal noun for anything in any style (I've only heard it used as an adjective). However there are literally ...


3

If I understand what you are asking I would say : The closest I can think of and what we use in Tang Soo Do a (Korean martial art); we refer to the Neh Gong, Weh Gong and Shim Gong. It does have different translations depending on it's use but you can think of this as the External Power, Internal Power and Spirit/Mind. When referring to it in the way of ...


3

This answer is in reply to @Dave Liepmann's query, and is in support of Trevoke's answer. No need to upvote this one. Dave Liepmann asked, "So, unbalancing and locking, or unbalancing or locking?" This is a common way to frame this concept. When your body has not learned this stuff, your mind wants to put this into neat boxes because the underlying ...


2

I don't believe your "advanced basics" are a set of techniques, but rather an application of a hapkido principle called Hwa (화), which is a principle of non-resistance, to your fundamentals (kibon sool). This can be thought of as similar to applying the "joining" principle in aikido or aikijujutsu, in that when the opponent pushes, you move in the direction ...


1

This question is specifically about uprooting in tai chi chuan. "All strength comes from the ground". Your CoG is less important than your peng path or ground strength vector. As I said in other posts it's not a mystical experience it's a mechanical process - see for example the articles here http://ismag.iay.org.uk/. To uproot someone means to disrupt ...


1

There is also a small reference work called "Aikido Terminology: An essential reference tool in both English and Japanese." The book has very thorough explanation of the language -- with things grouped usefully, (e.g. "stances", "etiquette", etc). It very clearly explains the words in English and Japanese including pronunciation.



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