Hot answers tagged

21

"Harden up", "come on", "toughen up", "get it together", "just do it", and "let's go" can all be slotted into the same purpose. One could even reach for "osu". I find the gist of the phrase comes more from elements other than word choice, such as volume, sharpness of tone, or accompanying the phrase with a loud clap.


9

The short form of the answer is that it is entirely dependent on the organization and its standards and customs. For the longer answer, start by looking at the way the word "master" is used in English and notice that it has several meanings that are only loosely related. "Master" can mean "teacher", it can mean "lord" especially when referring to the ...


8

It's hard to tell, but it looks like the dude on the right's left arm is pushed up behind his back. I hear that called that a "chicken wing", which is similar to BJJ's "Kimura", catch-wrestling's double wrist lock, and judo's ude garami. I'm sure there's a name for it in SAMBO, and aikido too. I say "similar to" because most of those techniques actually ...


8

I totally agree on the pedantry stuff, and i think that it is really depending on what each person thinks about it. For me, a kind of Martial Art has a tradition, a specific form or style or is following certain rules. I believe that there is also some kind of beauty in those 'Arts'... I personally would even go further and divide Martial Arts and Combat ...


7

Since you are already using Japanese terms, may I suggest: 頑張れ -- ganbare! Which translates as "Do Your Best!"


7

Similar to Sardathrion's answer the definition on Wikipedia is Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, entertainment, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development. I and several members of the MA project there ...


6

The Oxford dictionary defines martial art as Various sports, which originated chiefly in Japan, Korea, and China as forms of self-defence or attack, such as judo, karate, and kendo. Merriam Webster defines martial art as any one of several forms of fighting and self-defense (such as karate and judo) that are widely practiced as sports And ...


6

This is a nothing lock - it is a made for television move. While Sherlock's thumb and index finger do lie along anterior wrist points used frequently with various wrist locks or throws (e.g. kotogaeshi in Aikido), this particular implementation is a waste of bandwidth and screen frames, it is a British version of Hollywood nonsense. Try it, and see how ...


4

How about "Fight it" or "Fight Through" something like that? It's positive and active, non gendered, and implies an opponent (their own fear etc) that can be beaten. Push Through would work too, often already used in medical settings re pain. Also an honest talk with the women in the group, they may have suggestions.


4

TL;DR I'm recommending "Step Up" as a replacement phrase. The other phrases I include are contextual, and some do not have the exact intent of "Man up". I kinda got carried away with phrases that might fit in the same slot as "Man up". For clarity, I understand "Man up" to mean that the person needs to recognize that their barriers are mental and do what ...


4

If we're talking umbrella terms, I tend to think of martial arts as anything that is a codified system of movement which currently, or has roots in the past, of being used for combat. This covers everything from currently combative focused methods, to sports, to cultural practices. There's a lot of waving around "true martial arts" but I think it's totally ...


4

Gut up. I heard Alex Jones use it once.


4

I'm not aware of a suitable term that has wide acceptance yet, but there seems to be a lot of discussion on this issue at present (in a wider context than Martial Arts). Recently, on Twitter, the term "Fortify!" has been suggested for this situation.


2

There's no worldwide definition for master or grandmaster. Some schools or lineages might apply it if you've been at a certain rank for X number of years, or if you can complete certain tasks or tests... outside of that, it's pretty much what anyone chooses to call themselves or others choose to call them. In my own personal view, someone who has good ...


2

Ain't nobody my master. For sure ain't nobody my grandmaster. I've got sensei, I've got coaches. Those are personal relationships with reciprocal obligations of their own, and I choose them. But the idea of a man having a master is outdated feudal* bullpuckey. Similarly, my coaches have coaches, and sometimes they teach me. In that case they're my coach, and ...


2

Given the context, "Mean it!" might serve the purpose, but I quite like "Gut up!" suggested above. Pretty sure all peoples, genders, ages, etc. are presumed to have guts.


2

My football (American) coach used to say "Get after it." It's a bit of a Texas kind of thing (pretty sure he was from Texas), but I found it motivating. For example, he'd sometimes talk about how he was 5th string his first year in college, but he "went after it" and was starting by the end of the season. Or while out on the field, he'd get in your face, ...


2

We can't answer your question The particular distinction that you've provided differs between systems, languages, organizations, and sometimes individuals. Since you haven't specified your organization, we can't even address why they consider "instructor" and "teacher" differently. More broadly, the reasoning may range from ceremonial titles (some styles ...


1

Personally I like "bring it!" I think this phrase covers the intended nuance of the OPs question, because the "it" can encompass all of the qualities he's seeking to stimulate: courage, skill, strength, effort, fortitude, etc. It's also not particularly macho. I find a lot of the suggestions offered so far still focus on "being tough", which whether ...


1

Ante up. I've heard this used interchangeably with "Step up." The phrase comes from poker, "to up the ante" i.e. raise the stakes. "Go big or go home" might also work.


1

Is this not political correctness gone mad? The word 'man' is in its purest sense not gender specific anyway. In old English (and not technically changed), as still used in legal speak, 'man' simply means person. In fact, at risk of going off on a tangent, the term 'women' is technically more derogatory because it comes from the old English word for ...


1

Here are some calls for renewed motivation from my army days: Warrior up, Pain is just weakness leaving the body, Everyone must choose one of two pains: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret, It's not how much more you can take, it's how much more you can give, and my favorite - Half-right face! Front leaning-rest postion, move! Now...beat ...


1

I'd suggest encouraging perseverance/effort with a phrase like "push yourself", "keep going", "nearly there", "dig in", "last N seconds", "let's up the pace, folks", "you know what to expect now, throw yourself into it", or - with caution - "imagine you're doing this to defend yourself".... In Japanese arts, "gumbate [ne]" is an option... it means something ...


1

On this site, I see differentiation of self defense from martial arts, with self defense being more what I would expect in seminar classes (avoidance, understanding crime) rather than years-long study. Refer to Which martial arts focus on self defense?. I am generally confused about the jargon applied to this classification as well.


1

A martial art is the practise of any exercise where the goal is to defeat an opponent through the application of physical force directed against them. There are many martial arts, it's the very broadest of terms, but they can often be broken down further into more specific categories. Such as combat sports. They are still martial arts, but the emphasis of ...


1

The clue is in the term 'martial art'. Martial, relating to military and combat, art relating to its original meaning in the English language, where art was not necessarily the subjective thing it is now, art in this sense means skill set. So 'martial art' means a set of skills used for combat in time of war. Of course the language has changed, and how we ...


1

In Kukki-Taekwondo (WTF) the definition varies. Officially the Kukkiwon doesn't award Grandmaster titles. Most people generally assume that 8th Dan Kukkiwon and upward is Grandmaster - the Kukkiwon staff will frequently refer to 8th Dans as Grandmaster, but often slip to Master. I asked my contact at Changmookwan HQ in Korea to ask the head of ...


1

In my art Tang Soo Do, we have Gups (colored belt, or beginning students), Dans ("black belts"), Ko Sa Nim (Instructor, generally about 2nd degree) Sa Bom Nims (Master instructor, 4th degree +). Grandmasters (8 degree +), Kwan Jang Nim (Is the head of the federation or the master of all the masters in a given group of schools for example WTSDF Word Tang Soo ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible