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49

Consider learning a self defence system instead of a martial art If getting good at defending yourself in a fairly short space of time is more important to you than long-term study of a particular martial system or philosophy, you may wish to consider a self-defense system instead of a martial art. In an essay titled, "Are Martial Arts Self-Defense?", Marc ...


33

Go and have a look at all the clubs around where you live. Train once or watch a session. Then pick the one that has the best instructor, the more friendly students, and the one you had the most fun with. Style is second to whoever is teaching you, to whomever you train with, and to however much fun it is. All in equal measures.


30

The flinch reaction is a nervous system reaction to a stimulus in order to protect a portion of the body inherently felt to be at risk. When your nervous system is repeatedly overridden (for example, when we repeatedly stretch past the point of basic resistance) the body relaxes and the signal to fire that reflex is no longer sent under that stimulus. ...


20

Traditionally, in times of war you teach the right hand. In times of peace, you teach both hands. I train in a Chinese school, and Chinese schools typically favor ambidextrous training ... if you have the time. In my case, I find myself freely using either hand in simple, day-to-day life tasks. This happens without thinking. I find that movements that show ...


17

In the fire service we have to train on conserving air in life safety situations. So we work on breathing control which lowers our heart rates as well. One method Reilly-Emergency Breathing Technique (R-EBT): While exhaling, “hum” your breath out in a slow, consistent manner. The hum is low and usually cannot be heard over the low-air alarm. In ...


17

In my experience there are a few reasons why someone loses that passion: that person was never going to stick around anyway they have a mistaken idea of the glamor and mysticism in martial arts the teacher fails to keep the student inspired the student requires a bit of a holiday For #1, there is nothing you can do. Life is full of people like this ...


17

Sparring should emphatically not end in you being beaten bloody, no matter the sport. Sparring is a contact activity, and you should expect to take some knocks, but it is also an activity founded on control and trust. There's an important difference between toughening up and learning to take a hit and actually being harmed. This is doubly important for ...


15

Define "adept." You aren't going to find much in the way of scientific studies that are specific to martial arts in this regard. There are too many variables, and we encounter many of the same problems that the fitness community does. To add a data point, however: With my group's Hapkido, we're taught to use both because it is a self defense martial art ...


15

A wrestler will say wrestling, a bjj player will say bjj, a muay thai fighter will say muay thai. But to be fair, they are all right. There isn't really one specific art that is better then the other for a base. I know, some people will argue with me for this, but if you look at the current state of mma, there are champions with a wide assortment of ...


14

"Clinch happens." Without training, people who fight very frequently end up in a clinch or on the ground. (This is common for people who train in non-sparring, non-grappling arts, too.**) It's just a natural outcome for a fight, unless you're proficient in grappling. In most cases, one cannot stop grappling without...drum roll...grappling. Probabilities ...


13

Young male, not looking for anything specific, but I am a huge fan of MMA in general. You just answered your own question: try something that has already caught your interest. It's not at all hard to find a school in your area. Look some up and check them out.


13

In my experience this is not a good way to learn, no matter how capable a teacher you are. I'm not saying that it won't work, just that the chance it being successful is very low. Any martial art takes a lot of time, patience and discipline to learn. Outside of the dojo these things can all be in short supply. Training at the dojo forces you to make the ...


13

The first, and biggest, point is that if it hurts don't do it. Be careful with an injured shoulder, possibly focusing more on the opposite side or starting on your injured side significantly more slowly or at a lower height (get the dive roll perfect from the knees first). The other major thing is to make sure you are practicing on good mats. There's no ...


13

Yes! Martial arts can help you with posture, improve you overall fitness and stamina, and give you the discipline to do things correctly. No! There are much better ways to get a good posture and behaviour while working at a desk than joining a martial art class. You can see a physiotherapist, get a new chair, have a work station safety analysis done, take ...


12

If the students are going too hard on the beginners, the instructor either don't care or has lost control of the class. It's his or her responsibility to make sure everybody is safe. Most good schools ease their beginners into sparring. They start of with some light sparring, and then progress from there. Even pro fighters spar easy a lot of the time, as ...


12

I had this exact problem, at the same point in my progress at judo. Things that didn't work for me I tried doing uchikomi slowly and deliberately. This usually ended up with me hunched over in a full squat, unbalanced, unable to stand back up with the throw, without any kuzushi applied to my uke. I tried uchikomi for speed, whipping into each rep. Doing ...


12

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


11

Self-defense Scope Self-defense has many elements unrelated to hand-to-hand combat. Everyone interested in self-defense should wear a seatbelt, avoid smoking and addictive drugs, stay fit (in particular, capable of running very fast), and cultivate a basic knowledge of general self-defense strategies like being assertive, de-escalation, and situational ...


10

You should practice techniques on both sides. That being said, most of the time you're going to use your dominant side, so you should practice that the most, but more often than you expect, the opportunity is going to come up where a non-dominant side technique will allow you a decisive score or perhaps even a victory, so never discount the possibility. ...


10

Very interesting question. Having long been fascinated by body language and micro expressions, I incorporated that into my training. This won't even remotely be an option for most people as the time it took to even develop a functional use when not under pressure was well over a decade. That said, a few tips that came from that training that have been of ...


10

I'm going to be very precise with my answer here. Your technique will remain the same, your kicks and punches should still be the same as when you practice them. What does change though is your approach to your opponent so that you can deliver that technique. Because your opponent is taller, you will have more issues than it just being harder to reach their ...


10

Choosing a teacher can be very important, but as you are a beginner you don't have to be too fussy initially, you should be prepared to experiment and trial a few different schools. But personally I think you are looking at this the wrong way. There are a number of things to consider: the classes are only an hour long. This could be the result of a number ...


10

Don't. Stop practicing and let it heal. What you should do is rehab work. Stretches, slow (VERY SLOW) movements exercising the range of motion of various muscle groups. [Edit - I know a girl who injured something in her hip, I don't know what, and she won't let it heal. She reinjures herself constantly.]


9

9 to 12 months. Just a guideline. I say this time frame because, simply from experience, thats about how long - after regular and quality training - before a student starts to see some of their training take hold as instinct. But the question itself is fairly unsophisticated, and isnt answerable in a way that'd be relevant to any given individual. Its ...


8

stslavik has the right idea. You need to dampen your current reaction so you can substitute another. Martial Arts hoodoo talk: You flinch because your mind gets caught on the idea of being hurt. If you can still your mind, your reactions will become more in line with your intent. For me the thing that's helped most is visualization. As stslavik ...


8

There are a few different martial arts that focus in that area. Some traditional and some modern. It should also be mentioned that the art you practice regularly and reliably is the "best" art in this regard: A very experienced US Tai-Chi practitioner can still be very effective in a self defense situation, simply because they know so much about how to move ...


8

Its really useful. Most useful the sooner you see it afterwards. I've found, in the past, that anything relatively tricky (like jumping techniques, or flips) really benefit from this. Many times with instruction I've been told, "you just need to do X" and I'll think to myself that I was doing X! Very easy to sort out the "I thought I was doing X" ...


8

Without knowing what your goals are for getting into shape, or how you intend to get back into kendo, all I can do is comment on how I approached getting back into karate. I had a lengthy layoff from karate (about 2 years) due to issues with psoriasis on the soles of my feet. What I didn't know at the time is that the intensity of the psoriasis was related ...


8

While you are getting yourself into this state while practicing Thai Boxing this isn't a question that is specific to martial arts. It is perfectly normal to feel this way after intense training. Your body needs to recover, recovery will usually consist mostly of sleep and nutrition. Often after an intense workout the last thing you will feel like doing is ...


8

Where did this myth come from? Martial arts instructors are frequently tasked with running a sport workout without having any formal training (that is, outside of their own dojo) to do so. This means that many of these instructors--my past self included--ran classes that were particularly counterproductive from a workout-design perspective. One of the most ...



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