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6

I just want to point out that a lot of martial arts demonstrations like these are actually illusions. Bricks used for breaking are often chemically treated and baked longer to become more brittle. They look like ordinary bricks, but they're far easier to break. At some demonstrations I've seen, I laughed because I saw bricks actually crumble into pieces just ...


3

I've found a key part of the learning process is experimentation. First, learn the basics to where you can do them consistently well. Not perfect, but good. Then play a bit with it. Change the angles, a little bit. Change the weight distribution. Change your timing of when you push off or drop your weight to get your strikes in. The point of this is ...


3

According to this Livestrong article, it starts with pressure against sandbags: The head is hardened over time through static contact with other objects. Areas of focus on are the forehead, the top of the head and the back of the head. The student begins by leaning the head either perpendicularly or vertically onto sandbags for several months, two times ...


1

There are a few aspects to this: Make sure you're developing those "perfectionist" techniques so you can apply them minimally from your usual fighting position - they should snap out with minimal telegraphing. Practice on the heavy bag, making sure you can launch a wide variety of your techniques from the same guard position, as well as advance, retreat, ...


1

You should focus on the details now so that you can free yourself from them later. The proper mechanics are vitally important. Proper posture, alignment, and balance are fundamental to functionality (and injury mitigation). Once your form has become second nature, you can work on spontaneity and improvisation. You can only really customize the techniques ...



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