Hot answers tagged

24

Wing chun doesn't have to be bad for this school to be bad for you. It sounds like you're not comfortable there. I think you should stop training with these people.


21

"Harden up", "come on", "toughen up", "get it together", "just do it", and "let's go" can all be slotted into the same purpose. One could even reach for "osu". I find the gist of the phrase comes more from elements other than word choice, such as volume, sharpness of tone, or accompanying the phrase with a loud clap.


19

Nobody cares if a man likes the idea of women-only classes. They're not for you. They're for women. With some historical perspective, poo-pooing the idea of women-only classes becomes even more ridiculous. In my lifetime, women were banned from many karate and judo dojo. To turn around so quickly and say that women must train with men, not on their own, ...


12

In my experience as a male trainer and trainee the key for a hard, educational or maybe painful training is trust between all parts of the training group. Female fighters have told me that they were beaten up in training after they told their opponent to slow down. Afterwards they felt violently abused. So in such a case the trainer has the responsibility ...


11

First, men who know nothing about martial arts may see a woman leading the class and immediately think that they (the men) could beat up the female teacher. So they think there is no reason why the woman could teach them anything about fighting. Second, some men might not want to train with women at all (students or teachers), because it would be awkward ...


9

There are many valid reasons (fitness, self defence, enhance self worth, socialise, whatever...) why one goes to train but politics is not one of them. So, just smile and walk away. Avoid conversations dealing with it. If asked, say you do not care. If that means leaving the dojo/style, do so. It is just not worth your time. Whether you are "rank and file" ...


9

This sort of product will fail to achieve any short term or long term benefits over regular training. In fact, some results show that it can hinder performance. People believe these sorts of products can increase their red blood cell count by reducing oxygen levels, similar to the way training at altitude can increase red blood cell count. The problem is ...


9

Just as a women that trained in both women-only and mixed-classes: Body issues - I feel more confident when I'm surrounded by women. In my gender-mixed training I always make sure I wear long pants. Strength - I can't do push ups, which is totally accepted in women-only class but less accepted in classes where there are mostly men. This is of course even ...


8

Do you have a bad Wing Chun teacher? I don't know, as it really does not sound at all like Wing Chun. Going back to its roots, Wing Chun is actually named for one of the early female practitioners of the art. It emphasizes techniques where the user flows around the enemy, as it is expected that the WC user would lose when facing an opponent head-on (...


8

An analysis of the literature in 2006 presented data for a number of team and individual contact sports. Concussions in boxing were identified at a rate of 0.8/10 rounds (for pros) or 7.9/1000 man-minutes (amateur). So in a pro bout you can expect one guy or the other to be concussed on average, and one guy or the other to be concussed per hour on average ...


8

But, when training, you can stop and breathe. But there's no time to breathe in a real fight. This difference does not have to exist. A coach should occasionally put students through sparring of some kind that the student should not take breaks in. That can take many forms, including hard rounds with someone else from the gym, or a smoker match-up with ...


7

No. The only asset is if you have to training less BJJ to training Muay Thai. If you will train MT and will have the same hours of training of BJJ this is not a issue. As a martial art you need spend time training. The longer you practice the luckiest you are. Rickson Gracie


7

Accidents happen. However, when you have an accident with people you are not really trying to hurt - you make extra effort to make sure the accident doesn't happen again - otherwise it is not an accident. If someone's ego at losing in sparring causes them to attempt to really injure someone, that is not a safe person to work with. Consider what you are ...


7

You may see this as disruptive, and you may feel anxiety as a result. Provided they are respecting your commands in general I would strongly suggest that you don't worry about it. Going off on tangents while doing one on one training or drills is important - this type of experimentation can lead to the students learning new applications for moves, and just ...


7

In general you will do a lot of things in training that may not be directly applicable in a fight. This does not mean that they are not helpful. For example: what is the likely practical fighting application of a press up? This can also extend to Stances - some stances are designed to work your leg muscles and increase your balance. My experience comes ...


7

Yes, this is normal although not common. Grading are set to determine if the examinee has a certain skill set appropriate for said grade. If they have, they should pass. If not, they should fail1. Most, if not all, syllabus have a recommended time between gradings. That time is a general on average most students will be able to learn the skills for the ...


7

Since you are already using Japanese terms, may I suggest: 頑張れ -- ganbare! Which translates as "Do Your Best!"


7

I just want to point out that a lot of martial arts demonstrations like these are actually illusions. Bricks used for breaking are often chemically treated and baked longer to become more brittle. They look like ordinary bricks, but they're far easier to break. At some demonstrations I've seen, I laughed because I saw bricks actually crumble into pieces just ...


6

Hi have a trained a couple of ladies over the years and here is my take on it. For starters, there is a difference between training hard and just getting beat up. While I believe that is very important that you treat a women the same way you treat a man it is also important to not discourage a women from training. First - As a women you should be aware ...


6

While it is essential that you get enough protein (and calories by the way) in your daily diet if you want to build muscle, it turns out that the timing of it is not important at all. Studies show that consuming protein right before, after, or during a weight-training workout doesn't gain you anything. This is despite what you've heard from weightlifters and ...


6

Of course you should quit! From what you said, you are neither having fun nor learning anything. I know you are young but your time is valuable. There is no point in wasting your time with people who do not appreciate you and refuse to teach you. The shame is theirs. Find another martial art class to go to, one where you can learn, grow, and have fun. If ...


6

I agree the desired end-state has men and women training together, but it can be difficult to start there. People do not always voice complaints. I suspect this is because complaining is viewed as a form of weakness. In judo, which involves close-contact grappling, I have seen men (instructors even!) get inappropriately cozy with young women; they create ...


6

There's a good reason why an instructor pairs two students of unequal skill together. The student that is of lesser skill will begin to accelerate their knowledge when exposed to someone of greater skill. The student that is of greater skill, on the other hand, improves his/her knowledge of the art by being put in a position to explain things to the lesser ...


5

I think there is a 'superman' complex that many beginners suffer from. A notion that they are doing well in class maybe won a competition or two. Get to a real fight and the natural instinct to run our be aggressive is lost to trying to figure out whether to throw a punch or a kick. This, along with semi or light contact training can give a false sense of ...


5

The best way to train for martial arts is to do basic strength and conditioning alongside your chosen art. Basic conditioning means a mix of slower/longer runs with sprints. Basic strength training means fundamental resistance exercises (squats, lunges, deadlifts, pull-ups, pressing motions) using something like a barbell or dumbbells. This changes only ...


5

In summary, you're attempting to regain some kicking ability that you once had but have lost due to inactivity and lack of practice. Your goals are to improve range of motion and flexibility, speed, and control even when holding your kick in place without moving at all. And you'd like to even surpass your abilities when you were once in regular practice. Yet,...


5

A good coach does not need to be better than his students but they need to understand how to make their students better. It is not easy but I feel that this is what you are lacking. I would allows the senior grades to train with each other for some of the session time: during that time, you tell them to do a kata such as the kaishiwaza or all variations on ...


5

I totally understand your problem I have had similar problems and often with people who are of the same grade as me and sometimes even students of a lower grade than myself. I would suggest perhaps splitting the class up, let the higher grades that cause confusion use one half of the dojo to do more advanced practice and you take the lower grade students ...


5

Is it generally expected in martial arts systems that all training stances/positions (horse stances, front stances, drop stances, etc.) will have direct fighting applications? Generally expected... No. In reality. Yes. All stances have fighting applications. All movements in kata or forms have direct fighting applications. They may not be immediately ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible