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12

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


7

All martial arts—if properly understood—can lead to "spiritual peace" (that's in quotes because in context, this would mean [the second half of] "calm"; but explaining that is a whole chapter of a book). Examples Ju Do "judo" (the gentle way). Understand its concepts and you need not exert any strength at all. Tai Chi: Understanding the forces of nature ...


7

I do BJJ/grappling and stand up jujitsu, and I've discovered the following works best for long hair: Pull your hair into a tight, low ponytail on the side of your head, not straight back, else when you grapple it will get trapped under your head on the ground. Quickly braid the hair and secure with a second band! It's nowhere near the work of the full ...


7

Don't choose an art, choose a school. I'm suffering from arthritis in my knees and medial epicondlyitis (a temporary condition in my elbow which gives me some understanding of your plight). I practice Tai chi and Aikido; the style of aikido I practice (Tomiki) borrows heavily from Judo. My sister was an Olympic level Kareteka until she injured her elbow; ...


6

Aikido sounds like something you should check out. I would seek a ki-aikido school, if such existed where you lived based on your comment on "spiritual peace". Aikido generally relies on re-directing the attackers' momentum (and creating opportunity to do so) to either throw or pin. Technique is more important than strength and I have seen tiny females ...


6

Answer: Absolutely 16 is a great age to begin TKD training and you have plenty of time to become proficient enough for competition, provided you are in good physical condition. Since you mention that you practice ballet and gymnastics, your athleticism makes you an excellent candidate for TKD competition training. I would argue that someone could achieve ...


6

Yes, it's possible, but if you focus on that you're likely to be disappointed. Most people who start (any martial art, or anything else difficult for that matter) tend to drop out after a short time, or simply not have the time or natural talent to rise to elite competitive levels. And that's ok. It seems a little early to be caring about national level ...


6

Well you're talking about the specifics of when and how to breathe, but maybe you really should be asking about why one breathes and what are you trying to do with it. Generally speaking, when one exhales, this creates tension in the abdominal area. At the same time that your abdomen is tensing, you will also create tension in the entire core (the abdomen, ...


6

There are no good solutions. Long hair gets in the way of training unless knotted or braided, and even then it is liable to wiggle free and get in the way during hard training. All external tools--nets, headbands, bandanas, caps--are liable to come off. Well-executed braids and buns are slightly more reliable, but frequently come out anyway. You must ...


6

Magic is not real, so I am afraid that ying/yang energy is out. It is most likely that endorphins are being released after exercise. They can also be released during meditation.


5

The same way you learned on your dominant side. You didn't just pick up a sword and be a master swordsman on your dominant side. You had to learn the forms and practice them. You had to start slow, with simple motions, before you moved on to more complex combinations. The same principle applies to your off-hand side. Start with slow, simple motions, and as ...


5

There are a couple things that I would caution you about when using weighted clothing and/or bands. Distal placement - The farther out on a limb you place it, the more you increase the torque force on the joints. So if you put a 5 lb weight strap around your wrist, that 5 lbs of dead weight is going to produce a lot of snapping momentum at the end of a ...


5

The FBI compiles some data but not as fine-grained as you want. Beyond that I think you're SOL other than looking at guesses. My favorite such nonscientific approach is the "HAPV" (Habitual Acts of Physical Violence) idea formulated by Patrick McCarthy. He seems to describe things accurately in my judgment. That is to say, he alleges that the most common ...


5

In Living the Martial Way, Forrest Marshall makes the insight that you should run like you want to fight: if you want to fight at a slow, plodding, constant pace, then run long distances as a slow, plodding, constant pace. This advice is a gross simplification of exercise science but it is basically true in this context. Your coach is right. Long-distance ...


5

Conditioning and muscle endurance are the attributes which allow you to continue executing proper technique after the first few moments of a fight or bout. All the slick technique in the world is useless if you're too tired to execute that technique. Technique is important, but it tends to degrades rapidly as one tires. Being in condition for boxing allows ...


4

Bleeding is a big deal. You are damaging yourself and that is bad. You should wear protective gear, improve your technique, and punch less hard. In addition, I hope you clean all the biohazard that you leaked on the bag...


4

In its most basic sense, just let the scale be your guide. Weigh yourself at the same time under the same conditions every day (Such as first thing when you get up in the morning), and watch the trends. If you notice that your weight is creeping up, you need to either increase your cardio/workouts a bit or cut back on the calories a bit. Be aware that if you ...


4

Weighted clothing is not particularly useful since its benefits in terms of resistance are inversely proportional to how much it upsets your sport-specific movement. Put simply, it's not heavy enough to make you stronger, and if you do make it heavy enough, then you're practicing bad technique and making yourself tired without getting that much stronger or ...


4

I would like to provide the correct answer and ask you to discard the chosen answer completely. It's already a bit late to do that, but maybe it's not too late. Reason for the correction: In Judo, you DO NOT, in any way, need the muscle to CARRY your opponent, because you simply NEVER carry your opponent in Judo in any way. This excludes being mounted on ...


4

Wear protection Cant stress this enough Irrespective of what some schools may teach, it is detrimental to you and your well being to constantly increase your tenacity in hopes that your body would get "used to it" someday. Train smart. Master technique. If your body deteriorates, you have lost your primary weapon. Take care of your body at all costs.


4

NullPointer, it's a parable and it's either (a) impossible or (b) just a case of the guy healing & the doctors being wrong. Just a parable; there is no single guy this is based on. I believe the lesson is a little less than what you state; that a positive attitude can help you overcome obstacles including healing, but not necessarily to do the ...


4

While the answer can have all kinds of nuances, I suggest Krav Maga (full disclosure I practice it). My gf is 110lbs wet wearing boots, and takes Krav. She had no background in martial arts, and no real natural skill for it, but after training in KM for some time, she now has the confidence, knowledge, and skillset to adequately protect herself in many ...


4

There can be too much training, but everything you've described here sounds fine. If a student is overtraining they'll notice decreased performance on the mat, sluggishness all day, difficulty sleeping, persistent hunger, and other signs. Frequent training is fine as long as the student builds up training frequency slowly and remains on point with their ...


4

Keep HaraiGoshi as your main attack, but try to develop a couple of other throws, to be less predictable. Develop your Kumikata to be able to launch if from different grip. Feint with HaraiGoshi to setup a new move. One I liked myself was start with Harai Goshi, from a very close position, bend your leg and hook his exterior leg when he blocks, and use the ...


4

It all comes back to the question: What are you trying to do? If you're training in sword fighting, then use a sword. Just repeat the same sword cut over and over again. Try to go as fast as you can without losing accuracy. Repeat. In some amount of time, your forearms will tire. When they tire so much that either you're starting to slow down or you're ...


4

This is going to be something of a trial and error method for you, I think. You're going to have to try a bunch of things and go with what works the best or sucks the least. First of all, if your instructor outright bans shoes, that's one thing. If your instructor says no shoes "because" of some reason, then you have a little wriggle room. In that case, see ...


4

There are a great many martial arts that would be good for someone with rheumatoid arthritis. I would recommend Tai Chi or some other internal martial art like BaGua specifically for rheumatoid arthritis. I am not sure it would make the arthritis any better (it might), but there is very little emphasis on concussive force in the internal arts, at least ...


4

I believe the story you are referring to in Zen In The Martial Arts is the chapter, "Confident Seeing" on page 109. The instructor was Sam Brodsky and he was doing a demonstration for his students in which he intended to break 9 one inch slabs of concrete with one punch of his fist. While only breaking 7 slabs he had pulverized many of the small bones in ...


4

You probably gassed because you experienced an adrenaline dump. Solution: compete more. If you're training a lot then overtraining might be a culprit, but that's more easily evaluated by looking at the person's training schedule than the single data point of "gassed out in their first match". If you're not doing any out-of-class strength and conditioning ...


4

Take a regular beginner strength program, reduce the volume, and do that alongside BJJ. So, just to spitball a program for two days a week on top of BJJ that you're doing, say, 3 times a week: A day: squat 2 sets of 5, adding weight every 3 sessions. As many sets of towel-grip pull-ups necessary to get to 25 or 30. Add weight if it only takes 2 sets. B ...



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