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26

NO!!!!! Get out. Get out now. As in, do not train there even one more time. There is always the chance of being injured in any martial art. That's true of any active sport, of course--but "combat sports" have an intention of everyone getting hit, kicked, etc. The requirement for safety is therefore paramount. You need to train safely if you are going to be ...


13

Generally, no This is generally not true - there are many defensive arts where you improve your fighting skills right away and reach a basic proficiency within a matter of a few weeks or months at most (skill wise, at least, fitness can take longer to produce). Many weapon based arts that are close to their original use also have this same thing - if you ...


10

It seems a number of females share your problems. I read a number of female BJJ bloggers, and they have expressed similar feelings. My suggestion is to read what they have to say and maybe reach out to them: A tiny, shy woman who is mad keen on jiujitsu and gives a brutally honest account of her journey. A post a little while ago where she talks about ...


9

You're answering your own question here. In sparring they can't go light and hit with momentum and throw dangerous moves. I have seen another guy get an elbow to on the back of his neck and haven't seen him in weeks I got a very strong hook that gave me a huge black eye (after asking for them to go lighter). Last week during a seminar in ...


9

I have not been impressed with the stories I hear from people who have gone to these Asian martial arts retreats. These camps seem like a way to separate Westerners from their money while providing a bare minimum of services. Much like the explosion of "teacher training" yoga retreats, they provide an experience, not an education. First-Person Accounts ...


9

There's a few things to navigate and untangle in your question, but the short answer is YES, there are martial arts out there that do this. Mostly it comes down to instructor rather than specific style, although obviously certain styles tend to be grouped around testing, you can find instructors who do not participate in that manner. Holding Back ...


7

Drills are meant to teach your muscles to perform a technique properly. I would pad the hell out of the recipient before I let another student hit him/her full-force. It's not about inflicting damage, it's about learning how to do something properly and with force. That's how I do it anyway. There's no sense in punching the hell out of each other each time. ...


7

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're ...


7

I would surmise that most of the fitbit type trackers will not work accurately enough for your purposes. Most of these models rely either on accelerometers (devices that register the change in motion), or on GPS tracking/movement. I know from personal experience that even GPS watches that purport to sense treadmills based on hand movement are spotty at ...


6

Application of force. A weapon is a force multiplier. It lets you do more damage to your opponent, with less effort and exertion, in a shorter period of time, while exposing you to less danger of damage yourself. Having trained with weapons can help you in a self defense situation. This is particularly true if you have trained in weapons that can be ...


6

Reasons to Study Weapons I - improved coordination Training with weapons improves your coordination in ways that only controlling something that you don't have nerve endings in can. II - weapons of opportunity It's not just a stick. It's also, potentially, a sword, or a baseball bat, or a lead pipe. By training with a stick, you're also training with ...


6

I know one person who went to train in bagua and tai chi. He went to a relatively small training camp, got some good basic skills. But. That was 6 months of his life spent doing nothing but martial arts training. A lot of that was conditioning. Although he got a good set of basic skills, I can't say it'd be much different than if he spent the time here, ...


6

Yes, I've been to China to train at the Shaolin temple at Songshan mountain in Dengfeng, Henan, China. I did this only for a couple of weeks, mostly just for fun. My wife (then girlfriend) was training at a school in Houston where the head instructor was an actual Shaolin monk who had moved to the U.S. to start up a school. So the monk offered to arrange ...


6

tl;dr Balance breaking, timing, and power/speed is what you are looking for. The answer depends what type of training you: kata, randori, or shihai. In kata, you are supposed to learn basic movement. As such your uke should help you and not hinder you. A quick word with them to ask "why is this not working?" should fix it. Although I suspect that you are ...


5

When you train MMA you train each specific art that the gym offers: Brazilian jiujitsu (or, rarely, other forms of grappling), wrestling, some form of striking (usually muay Thai or MMA striking). You generally still train each constituent art separately at least some of the time. The concern is that training several arts at once will slow your advancement ...


5

Is there anything in particular that can be gained from these type of drills that can't be gained from fighting against a single opponent? Yes. There are two ways I could take your question, so I will address them both: Drill A If you're talking about a drill where one person stands in the middle of the circle, and attackers come one at a time, the ...


5

This is a standard exercise in Shodokan Aikido (required for every test). We call it either "Randori" or "Jiyu Waza". We don't standardize it the way you're asking. (In Chinese martial arts, the term may be Sanshou, but I'm not sure that is standardized. Closer to Kumite) My school used to do 4 attackers, 90 seconds, with each attacker starting their ...


5

I was the only 12 year old in a judo club full of brown/black belt adults, so I can identify with your experience on some levels! That said, as the beginner and the youth in this situation, the only things you can do are this: 1) Ask questions, ask for help, ask for advice. "Given my size, can you show me how I could make that technique work?" "Can you ...


5

You should do basic strength training using progressive overload, at a slower rate than someone who is not simultaneously working hard at karate. After you've built a base of strength through weight training, you should add some explosive movements so you can utilize your newfound strength to produce speed and power. Basically, this means you should do ...


5

You should get out. While it's true that any training there is a spectrum of how hard you may want to go - from the no-contact doing only forms kind of training up to folks like the Dog Brothers using full force stick fighting... the fact is that there's a point after which you are taking injuries and gaining nothing. And if the school is going harder than ...


5

Cold/hot flush Here's a trick I learned from a coach & sports medicine expert - after a workout, soak cold for 10 minutes then soak hot/warm after. I started doing that and found my own soreness reduced by 2/3rds (of course, pain is subjective so...) He typically dumped his players into a tub with ice, I'm not as hardcore so I just use a cold bath ...


5

I have worn my fitbit flex during warmup (purely accidental as I forgot to take it off when arriving at class). It doesn't give any sort of accurate reading of calories because it's only a pedometer and measures steps via arm swinging. I've also worn a Garmin Edge 500 with heart rate monitor and tucked the Edge into my underpants (just don't fall on it). ...


5

A good instructor will start your training with body conditioning and basic techniques. It is unlikely you will be thrown to the on your first day. As you become proficient in your skills, you may be invited to begin sparring with a partner (who should be matched to your size and skill level). Have courage, or as they say in Korean, Yong Gi. You will ...


4

Sequential Partnered Drills As you mention, drills where you're not actually facing multiple opponents simultaneously, but rather sequentially. The value in this is both endurance training and the issues of having to adjust to different, fresh opponents. Of course, this is not the same as dealing with multiple opponents simultaneously, and so, the value ...


4

Can I learn martial arts by own? Yes you can - but all you will have is an academic knowledge of the art, you won't be able to rely on it to defend yourself. To be honest you will probably hurt yourself more than your opponent if you relied upon it without some expert instruction. You can read all the books and watch all the youtube clips you want, but ...


4

I teach karate and wear the fitbit HR to measure heart rate. I also use the polo loop with the heart rate sensor. I am 55 and my weight is 210 lbs (95 kg), been working out with weights for 30 years. I burn about 750 to 1000 calories depending on sparring or not. Forms done with high power level can get my HR close to max. So most of it depends on your ...


4

For the first 3 to 4 years, you'll never fight anyone who is of a higher belt than yourself, so they won't be much better than you. Your opponent will be just as scared of you as you are of him. And after 4 years, you'll be a black belt and you'll be able to do all the same fancy things with your legs.


3

There's one series I've been following - it's a Chinese series called Kung Fu Quest. You can find a few seasons on Youtube with English subtitles. Season 1 is more cheesy, after that it becomes quite good. The show has a rotating group of hosts - they usually pick 2-3 guys to study a particular art for few weeks or months - a decent amount of time to get ...


3

MMA training will give you a solid set of conditioning, live drills/sparring, both with striking and grappling. There's a wealth of video and book references you can draw upon and you'll likely have lots of people to train with. Singular martial arts really depends on the art and the school. Any of the above that applies to an MMA school may, or may not ...


3

The one thing I would add to Dave's answer is that a MMA gym will tend to focus on practical a lot - and they will tend to emphasize the bigger stronger faster mantra. This is great if you are big or strong to begin with, but not so good if you don't fit those categories - in fact for a newbie it can be downright dangerous (you'll get hurt a few times), and ...



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