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28

NO!!!!! Get out. Get out now. As in, do not train there even one more time. There is always the chance of being injured in any martial art. That's true of any active sport, of course--but "combat sports" have an intention of everyone getting hit, kicked, etc. The requirement for safety is therefore paramount. You need to train safely if you are going to be ...


14

Generally, no This is generally not true - there are many defensive arts where you improve your fighting skills right away and reach a basic proficiency within a matter of a few weeks or months at most (skill wise, at least, fitness can take longer to produce). Many weapon based arts that are close to their original use also have this same thing - if you ...


10

In my experience as a male trainer and trainee the key for a hard, educational or maybe painful training is trust between all parts of the training group. Female fighters have told me that they were beaten up in training after they told their opponent to slow down. Afterwards they felt violently abused. So in such a case the trainer has the responsibility ...


9

There's a few things to navigate and untangle in your question, but the short answer is YES, there are martial arts out there that do this. Mostly it comes down to instructor rather than specific style, although obviously certain styles tend to be grouped around testing, you can find instructors who do not participate in that manner. Holding Back ...


9

I have not been impressed with the stories I hear from people who have gone to these Asian martial arts retreats. These camps seem like a way to separate Westerners from their money while providing a bare minimum of services. Much like the explosion of "teacher training" yoga retreats, they provide an experience, not an education. First-Person Accounts ...


9

You're answering your own question here. In sparring they can't go light and hit with momentum and throw dangerous moves. I have seen another guy get an elbow to on the back of his neck and haven't seen him in weeks I got a very strong hook that gave me a huge black eye (after asking for them to go lighter). Last week during a seminar in ...


7

Drills are meant to teach your muscles to perform a technique properly. I would pad the hell out of the recipient before I let another student hit him/her full-force. It's not about inflicting damage, it's about learning how to do something properly and with force. That's how I do it anyway. There's no sense in punching the hell out of each other each time. ...


7

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're ...


7

I would surmise that most of the fitbit type trackers will not work accurately enough for your purposes. Most of these models rely either on accelerometers (devices that register the change in motion), or on GPS tracking/movement. I know from personal experience that even GPS watches that purport to sense treadmills based on hand movement are spotty at ...


7

No. The only asset is if you have to training less BJJ to training Muay Thai. If you will train MT and will have the same hours of training of BJJ this is not a issue. As a martial art you need spend time training. The longer you practice the luckiest you are. Rickson Gracie


7

Accidents happen. However, when you have an accident with people you are not really trying to hurt - you make extra effort to make sure the accident doesn't happen again - otherwise it is not an accident. If someone's ego at losing in sparring causes them to attempt to really injure someone, that is not a safe person to work with. Consider what you are ...


6

I know one person who went to train in bagua and tai chi. He went to a relatively small training camp, got some good basic skills. But. That was 6 months of his life spent doing nothing but martial arts training. A lot of that was conditioning. Although he got a good set of basic skills, I can't say it'd be much different than if he spent the time here, ...


6

tl;dr Balance breaking, timing, and power/speed is what you are looking for. The answer depends what type of training you: kata, randori, or shihai. In kata, you are supposed to learn basic movement. As such your uke should help you and not hinder you. A quick word with them to ask "why is this not working?" should fix it. Although I suspect that you are ...


6

Yes, I've been to China to train at the Shaolin temple at Songshan mountain in Dengfeng, Henan, China. I did this only for a couple of weeks, mostly just for fun. My wife (then girlfriend) was training at a school in Houston where the head instructor was an actual Shaolin monk who had moved to the U.S. to start up a school. So the monk offered to arrange ...


6

While it is essential that you get enough protein (and calories by the way) in your daily diet if you want to build muscle, it turns out that the timing of it is not important at all. Studies show that consuming protein right before, after, or during a weight-training workout doesn't gain you anything. This is despite what you've heard from weightlifters and ...


5

You should do basic strength training using progressive overload, at a slower rate than someone who is not simultaneously working hard at karate. After you've built a base of strength through weight training, you should add some explosive movements so you can utilize your newfound strength to produce speed and power. Basically, this means you should do ...


5

When you train MMA you train each specific art that the gym offers: Brazilian jiujitsu (or, rarely, other forms of grappling), wrestling, some form of striking (usually muay Thai or MMA striking). You generally still train each constituent art separately at least some of the time. The concern is that training several arts at once will slow your advancement ...


5

You should get out. While it's true that any training there is a spectrum of how hard you may want to go - from the no-contact doing only forms kind of training up to folks like the Dog Brothers using full force stick fighting... the fact is that there's a point after which you are taking injuries and gaining nothing. And if the school is going harder than ...


5

Cold/hot flush Here's a trick I learned from a coach & sports medicine expert - after a workout, soak cold for 10 minutes then soak hot/warm after. I started doing that and found my own soreness reduced by 2/3rds (of course, pain is subjective so...) He typically dumped his players into a tub with ice, I'm not as hardcore so I just use a cold bath ...


5

I have worn my fitbit flex during warmup (purely accidental as I forgot to take it off when arriving at class). It doesn't give any sort of accurate reading of calories because it's only a pedometer and measures steps via arm swinging. I've also worn a Garmin Edge 500 with heart rate monitor and tucked the Edge into my underpants (just don't fall on it). ...


5

A good instructor will start your training with body conditioning and basic techniques. It is unlikely you will be thrown to the on your first day. As you become proficient in your skills, you may be invited to begin sparring with a partner (who should be matched to your size and skill level). Have courage, or as they say in Korean, Yong Gi. You will ...


5

I think there is a 'superman' complex that many beginners suffer from. A notion that they are doing well in class maybe won a competition or two. Get to a real fight and the natural instinct to run our be aggressive is lost to trying to figure out whether to throw a punch or a kick. This, along with semi or light contact training can give a false sense of ...


5

The best way to train for martial arts is to do basic strength and conditioning alongside your chosen art. Basic conditioning means a mix of slower/longer runs with sprints. Basic strength training means fundamental resistance exercises (squats, lunges, deadlifts, pull-ups, pressing motions) using something like a barbell or dumbbells. This changes only ...


5

Hi have a trained a couple of ladies over the years and here is my take on it. For starters, there is a difference between training hard and just getting beat up. While I believe that is very important that you treat a women the same way you treat a man it is also important to not discourage a women from training. First - As a women you should be aware ...


4

I teach karate and wear the fitbit HR to measure heart rate. I also use the polo loop with the heart rate sensor. I am 55 and my weight is 210 lbs (95 kg), been working out with weights for 30 years. I burn about 750 to 1000 calories depending on sparring or not. Forms done with high power level can get my HR close to max. So most of it depends on your ...


4

For the first 3 to 4 years, you'll never fight anyone who is of a higher belt than yourself, so they won't be much better than you. Your opponent will be just as scared of you as you are of him. And after 4 years, you'll be a black belt and you'll be able to do all the same fancy things with your legs.


4

It's not a problem unless you're training them wrong. If a school teaches you to FIGHT, you'll get better with each passing day. If the school only teaches you how to pass tests and look good while doing Kata, then you might have a problem.


3

I think either you or your self-defense instructor are misunderstanding something. If your instructor thinks it's too dangerous to take more than one class with him because of the possibility that you might learn something and try to use it for real, then it's the same as him saying that you should not learn anything from his classes. What kind of a teacher ...


3

there are no "secret" in martials art. do you really think that when you reach black belt, some weird man will come at you, hidden in shadows, and teach you a more powerfull secret technique that will allow you to beat the best of the world ? we arent in a bad '60 kung-fu movie ... There are techniques that aren't shown to white belt because these are ...


3

Context and understanding If you're working from an art that dates back to melee weaponry, then what that weapon training does for you is open up context to a lot of the movements you've been doing empty handed. Things like footwork, angles, range, the way in which you generate force, often were built entirely around a few primary weapons, the environment ...



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