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10

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


8

Stop planning your eventual wall of black belts and go get a blue belt in BJJ or a brown belt in judo or join a SAMBO school or join a wrestling club. Worry about integrating your grappling into your striking after you have some grappling skill. Try a class at each of the grappling schools in your area, pick the one with the highest quality teachers and ...


7

All martial arts—if properly understood—can lead to "spiritual peace" (that's in quotes because in context, this would mean [the second half of] "calm"; but explaining that is a whole chapter of a book). Examples Ju Do "judo" (the gentle way). Understand its concepts and you need not exert any strength at all. Tai Chi: Understanding the forces of nature ...


7

Don't choose an art, choose a school. I'm suffering from arthritis in my knees and medial epicondlyitis (a temporary condition in my elbow which gives me some understanding of your plight). I practice Tai chi and Aikido; the style of aikido I practice (Tomiki) borrows heavily from Judo. My sister was an Olympic level Kareteka until she injured her elbow; ...


6

Aikido sounds like something you should check out. I would seek a ki-aikido school, if such existed where you lived based on your comment on "spiritual peace". Aikido generally relies on re-directing the attackers' momentum (and creating opportunity to do so) to either throw or pin. Technique is more important than strength and I have seen tiny females ...


6

Practice on your own is pretty much an unavoidable element of the martial way past a certain point. Other than developing your body through conditioning exercise (Bruce Lee's plyometrics are a good starting point), you can develop your body through breathing exercises (the Systema DVDs about breathing are pretty interesting and insightful). It is important ...


6

Okay well if you do wing chun that is great, so do i! Yes it is definitely worth practicing alone. Here are some of the things i do: Get a 3 section wall bag and a wet towel (with somewhere to hang it). Assuming you have correct form on your sun fist punch, you should practice punching the center of a wet towel with out any water flicking back onto you. And ...


6

Answer: Absolutely 16 is a great age to begin TKD training and you have plenty of time to become proficient enough for competition, provided you are in good physical condition. Since you mention that you practice ballet and gymnastics, your athleticism makes you an excellent candidate for TKD competition training. I would argue that someone could achieve ...


6

Yes, it's possible, but if you focus on that you're likely to be disappointed. Most people who start (any martial art, or anything else difficult for that matter) tend to drop out after a short time, or simply not have the time or natural talent to rise to elite competitive levels. And that's ok. It seems a little early to be caring about national level ...


6

Well you're talking about the specifics of when and how to breathe, but maybe you really should be asking about why one breathes and what are you trying to do with it. Generally speaking, when one exhales, this creates tension in the abdominal area. At the same time that your abdomen is tensing, you will also create tension in the entire core (the abdomen, ...


6

I do BJJ/grappling and stand up jujitsu, and I've discovered the following works best for long hair: Pull your hair into a tight, low ponytail on the side of your head, not straight back, else when you grapple it will get trapped under your head on the ground. Quickly braid the hair and secure with a second band! It's nowhere near the work of the full ...


5

What is precision? There's a misconception about what it means to be precise, so to illustrate, let's examine two options: OPT1: A direct punch going straight out. OPT2: A punch that follows the target. If we attempt to strike a given moving target, it is the natural inclination to want to follow the target (OPT2) as we strike. This extends the length of ...


5

The same way you learned on your dominant side. You didn't just pick up a sword and be a master swordsman on your dominant side. You had to learn the forms and practice them. You had to start slow, with simple motions, before you moved on to more complex combinations. The same principle applies to your off-hand side. Start with slow, simple motions, and as ...


5

There are a couple things that I would caution you about when using weighted clothing and/or bands. Distal placement - The farther out on a limb you place it, the more you increase the torque force on the joints. So if you put a 5 lb weight strap around your wrist, that 5 lbs of dead weight is going to produce a lot of snapping momentum at the end of a ...


5

While the answer can have all kinds of nuances, I suggest Krav Maga (full disclosure I practice it). My gf is 110lbs wet wearing boots, and takes Krav. She had no background in martial arts, and no real natural skill for it, but after training in KM for some time, she now has the confidence, knowledge, and skillset to adequately protect herself in many ...


5

There are no good solutions. Long hair gets in the way of training unless knotted or braided, and even then it is liable to wiggle free and get in the way during hard training. All external tools--nets, headbands, bandanas, caps--are liable to come off. Well-executed braids and buns are slightly more reliable, but frequently come out anyway. You must ...


5

The FBI compiles some data but not as fine-grained as you want. Beyond that I think you're SOL other than looking at guesses. My favorite such nonscientific approach is the "HAPV" (Habitual Acts of Physical Violence) idea formulated by Patrick McCarthy. He seems to describe things accurately in my judgment. That is to say, he alleges that the most common ...


4

Your options as a college club are: Share what each member knows Find a coach or teacher Be a thoroughly mediocre "fight club" I recommend avoiding (3). Learning from online resources is hard and not recommended. Either accept that the styles you'll learn are the styles that each of your (possibly flaky, deranged, drama-bringing) fellow students brings ...


4

I would like to provide the correct answer and ask you to discard the chosen answer completely. It's already a bit late to do that, but maybe it's not too late. Reason for the correction: In Judo, you DO NOT, in any way, need the muscle to CARRY your opponent, because you simply NEVER carry your opponent in Judo in any way. This excludes being mounted on ...


4

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


4

In its most basic sense, just let the scale be your guide. Weigh yourself at the same time under the same conditions every day (Such as first thing when you get up in the morning), and watch the trends. If you notice that your weight is creeping up, you need to either increase your cardio/workouts a bit or cut back on the calories a bit. Be aware that if you ...


4

NullPointer, it's a parable and it's either (a) impossible or (b) just a case of the guy healing & the doctors being wrong. Just a parable; there is no single guy this is based on. I believe the lesson is a little less than what you state; that a positive attitude can help you overcome obstacles including healing, but not necessarily to do the ...


4

Weighted clothing is not particularly useful since its benefits in terms of resistance are inversely proportional to how much it upsets your sport-specific movement. Put simply, it's not heavy enough to make you stronger, and if you do make it heavy enough, then you're practicing bad technique and making yourself tired without getting that much stronger or ...


4

There can be too much training, but everything you've described here sounds fine. If a student is overtraining they'll notice decreased performance on the mat, sluggishness all day, difficulty sleeping, persistent hunger, and other signs. Frequent training is fine as long as the student builds up training frequency slowly and remains on point with their ...


4

Keep HaraiGoshi as your main attack, but try to develop a couple of other throws, to be less predictable. Develop your Kumikata to be able to launch if from different grip. Feint with HaraiGoshi to setup a new move. One I liked myself was start with Harai Goshi, from a very close position, bend your leg and hook his exterior leg when he blocks, and use the ...


4

It all comes back to the question: What are you trying to do? If you're training in sword fighting, then use a sword. Just repeat the same sword cut over and over again. Try to go as fast as you can without losing accuracy. Repeat. In some amount of time, your forearms will tire. When they tire so much that either you're starting to slow down or you're ...


4

This is going to be something of a trial and error method for you, I think. You're going to have to try a bunch of things and go with what works the best or sucks the least. First of all, if your instructor outright bans shoes, that's one thing. If your instructor says no shoes "because" of some reason, then you have a little wriggle room. In that case, see ...


4

There are a great many martial arts that would be good for someone with rheumatoid arthritis. I would recommend Tai Chi or some other internal martial art like BaGua specifically for rheumatoid arthritis. I am not sure it would make the arthritis any better (it might), but there is very little emphasis on concussive force in the internal arts, at least ...


3

Knowing which MA you are studying is important in tailoring your precision techniques, as with anything else relating to a particular MA style. However this only becomes more crucial at the stage when you are already an advanced student in that discipline. Here is why: I guess you would agree that what you really mean is how to hit a target with precision. ...


3

This answer has all the technical information you need, but recognize the following: You will not and cannot replicate the strength and conditioning of an experienced MMA fighter, since those athletes have a tremendous amount of sport-specific strength, conditioning, and skill that allows them to apply their general physical attributes efficiently and ...



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