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1

I feel a bit like a liability to the guy who keeps getting stuck with me for drilling. Don't worry about it. Training with smaller partners is a necessary skill. He can work on his fluid C-game instead of his smashy A-game. How should I go about getting moved around to some other partners for drilling? Don't worry about it. Your instructor will ...


1

It seems a number of females share your problems. I read a number of female BJJ bloggers, and they have expressed similar feelings. My suggestion is to read what they have to say and maybe reach out to them. http://gingersnaps.me/ a post a little while ago... http://gingersnaps.me/2014/07/21/women-in-bjj-are-not-delicate-flowers/ ...


1

My experience here is from the other side. I am still a white belt, but I started about a year ago as an adult man. The first time I was paired up with a woman, it was slightly strange. Also, the first time I was paired up with a kid, it was slightly strange. But the opposite perspective may be very helpful in overcoming the situation. How to get moved ...


0

I agree with very much of what Sadathrion writes in his answer, so I'd just like to add to it ... and, uh, it didn't fit in the comment box. Mind, that I am from a standup art and don't know a whole lot about grappling, but the same principles should apply. Take it up with your instructor Suggest you change partners from time to time. In our school, we ...


2

I was the only 12 year old in a judo club full of brown/black belt adults, so I can identify with your experience on some levels! That said, as the beginner and the youth in this situation, the only things you can do are this: 1) Ask questions, ask for help, ask for advice. "Given my size, can you show me how I could make that technique work?" "Can you ...


-1

Do you have a friend and/or sibling (gender is utterly irrelevant here) that you can bring to the class to train with? Probably they would be of a similar age and thus might be of a similar size. This would be your best option to be honest. Question 1: Some people might be uncomfortable training with a young girl for whatever reasons. So, don't force them ...


1

Sounds like you have lots of wants and wishes. But the best thing is to simplify, don't try and do everything, sounds to me you want to focus on :- striking, clinching, takedowns, ground fight (no gi, with strikes). So if you lay this out to all the people with different skills, you can all contribute how you want to do each part, look at what each ...


2

You can learn some things alone. But there's a lot of caveats worth noting. Self defense is risk reduction Martial arts can give you some tools, but it's worth noting that the best safety is avoiding danger where you can. So - the best training you can do alone right now is finding away to get yourself up on some short distance sprint training. ...


3

Can I learn martial arts by own? Yes you can - but all you will have is an academic knowledge of the art, you won't be able to rely on it to defend yourself. To be honest you will probably hurt yourself more than your opponent if you relied upon it without some expert instruction. You can read all the books and watch all the youtube clips you want, but ...


5

Application of force. A weapon is a force multiplier. It lets you do more damage to your opponent, with less effort and exertion, in a shorter period of time, while exposing you to less danger of damage yourself. Having trained with weapons can help you in a self defense situation. This is particularly true if you have trained in weapons that can be ...


4

Reasons to Study Weapons I - improved coordination Training with weapons improves your coordination in ways that only controlling something that you don't have nerve endings in can. II - weapons of opportunity It's not just a stick. It's also, potentially, a sword, or a baseball bat, or a lead pipe. By training with a stick, you're also training with ...


2

What do you want out of your training? Should it part of a martial arts curriculum is almost impossible to answer, especially without knowing what exactly you want out of your training. As Marc MacYoung explains, there are 5 broad categories you can break out the goals of martial arts into. Self-defense is one of them, but as he also explains martial ...


1

MCMAP is a good martial arts program and the online resources (the guide book which can be download from the US military site is really quite good with really detailed body movements). I would suggest to start practicing the core curriculum for each belt level the double prescribed amount of hours. As above I would suggest free sparring with rules and ...


1

I've given an anwser to a similar question detailing the structure of my solo training routine. http://martialarts.stackexchange.com/a/4288/3064 To answer your question if solo training is useful in my opinion, and I think this question is one of those that generates a lot of opinions and point of views which may all be different but none the less valid up ...


1

Lose weight and pack on fast twitch muscles in your feet, calves and thighs. An area of muscles that are overlooked often when thinking of jumping is the hamstrings. Your hamstrings pull your knees back like a spring, straightening your leg and launching you into the air. Uphill sprints are great for this. But don't forget about actually practicing the ...


1

An unexpected benefit of many-on-one fighting exercises is that it teaches you to remain alert to your surroundings and teaches you to recognise where the openings in your defense are. You may never realise that your back is a giant juicy target if you only ever spar against one other opponent. But when facing more than one opponent, you learn to guard ...


2

Is there anything in particular that can be gained from these type of drills that can't be gained from fighting against a single opponent? The drills are just stepping stones to many-on-one free-sparring, so the important thing is what skills are needed against many opponents that won't necessarily be cultivated efficiently in one-on-one sparring. ...


4

Sequential Partnered Drills As you mention, drills where you're not actually facing multiple opponents simultaneously, but rather sequentially. The value in this is both endurance training and the issues of having to adjust to different, fresh opponents. Of course, this is not the same as dealing with multiple opponents simultaneously, and so, the value ...


5

Is there anything in particular that can be gained from these type of drills that can't be gained from fighting against a single opponent? Yes. There are two ways I could take your question, so I will address them both: Drill A If you're talking about a drill where one person stands in the middle of the circle, and attackers come one at a time, the ...


1

Grappling dummies are most useful for a ground work not for take down training. From what is available on the market submission master is most realistic grappling dummies available Part of what makes it so good is the fact that its arms and legs are stiff enough to be realistic and also to return back to their original position, but also elastic enough to ...



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