Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The other answers are all good, but there is one thing missing from the equation here; what is the goal with your training? Do you want to become more fit? Do you want to compete? Do you want to learn how to handle yourself in a dangerous situation? I want to become more fit If it's only the physical training you want it doesn't really matter if you're ...


3

MMA training will give you a solid set of conditioning, live drills/sparring, both with striking and grappling. There's a wealth of video and book references you can draw upon and you'll likely have lots of people to train with. Singular martial arts really depends on the art and the school. Any of the above that applies to an MMA school may, or may not ...


3

The one thing I would add to Dave's answer is that a MMA gym will tend to focus on practical a lot - and they will tend to emphasize the bigger stronger faster mantra. This is great if you are big or strong to begin with, but not so good if you don't fit those categories - in fact for a newbie it can be downright dangerous (you'll get hurt a few times), and ...


5

When you train MMA you train each specific art that the gym offers: Brazilian jiujitsu (or, rarely, other forms of grappling), wrestling, some form of striking (usually muay Thai or MMA striking). You generally still train each constituent art separately at least some of the time. The concern is that training several arts at once will slow your advancement ...


0

There's one series I've been following - it's a Chinese series called Kung Fu Quest. You can find a few seasons on Youtube with English subtitles. Season 1 is more cheesy, after that it becomes quite good. The show has a rotating group of hosts - they usually pick 2-3 guys to study a particular art for few weeks or months - a decent amount of time to get ...


-1

Fighting multiple attackers is always bad, so I need to point a few things out. First of all, in a real world fight, u are going to have a lot of people coming at you at once, so u need to train in how to throw strikes so that the strikes (punches, kicks etc) have the maximum effect on the maximum amount of people. Otherwise, you will get your butt kicked.


1

I'm mainly interested in unarmed combat, but still highly value practice with weapons. Firstly, defending unarmed against a weapon forces you to do things you might not bother trying if the opponent wasn't armed that will never-the-less engender heightened reactions and awareness; honed reading of your opponent's posture, inertia/momentum, awareness and ...


0

A lot of traditional martial art weapons are rather dated since the invention of the rifle/gunpowder-based weapons/warfare. Most people don't fight on the battlefield Most people don't fight people armed with a gun [...] weapons that generally have no practical/realistic use in modern times [...] Many people carry umbrellas (or can carry a cane ...


-1

Oh, MMA... grappling is the last place you want to be. Grappling is commitment to a singular engagement. In other words, grappling is a commitment to a singular opponent, when in real life, there will likely, or at least possibly, be multiple opponents. 'Mobility is effective','Commitment is failure'. Cadence is the method that will stop a grappler. They ...


2

Context and understanding If you're working from an art that dates back to melee weaponry, then what that weapon training does for you is open up context to a lot of the movements you've been doing empty handed. Things like footwork, angles, range, the way in which you generate force, often were built entirely around a few primary weapons, the environment ...



Top 50 recent answers are included