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7

From the origin of belts and gis themselves: Kano apparently began the custom of having his yudansha wear black obi (belts) in 1886. These obi weren't the belts karateka and judoka wear today -- Kano hadn't invented the judogi (Judo uniform) yet, and his students were still practicing in kimono. They were the wide obi still worn with formal kimono. In ...


7

I usually wash it at hottest possible temperature, and that does the trick (beware though, this might shrink a new dogi). If it is very dirty, I handwash it with plenty of washing detergent (making sure it gets in there), and then let it soak overnight, before I wash it. Back when I was a kid, my mom used to soak it with chlorine to get the worst grass and ...


4

I find wearing a 100% cotton undershirt helps if you can tolerate it. It acts as an intermediate layer and worse case can be swapped with another. For stains that manage to get past this using some sort of spray'n'wash product is useful but it needs to applied after a training session or soaked in combination to help remove the stubborn ones.


2

When I first started training, I was expected to learn about the history of Karate and answer questions regarding the colours and symbols of our uniforms. One such question was: "Why is our gi white?" I believe that what I was taught goes well with what a previous poster stated: "The white uniform represented the values of purity, avoidance of ego, and ...


2

I had a off-white/cream coloured gi back in the day and that was great for not showing sweat stains. If you have to have a bright-white gi, there are non-chlorine, colour-fast bleaches you can get today. I'm not sure what my mother did about the blood stains, but that's a separate conversation. (Yes, I lived at home and was pampered. :-)


2

What I used to do for me (Shotokan then Shukokai karate) and for my kids (Tae-Kwondo) was a round stitch twice round the perimeter of the badge and they never comes off. Grappling is going to cause more problems though - some areas of your gi will just never be good to attach badges (eg for judo the shoulders and anything too near the centre of the chest) ...


2

Be more Zen. Wear the badge of no-badge. :-) I think that after my first gi, I didn't bother ever sewing any badges on. Maybe it's my inner British general1 rising up, but I never saw the point of them. My belt and my reputation says everything you need to know. 1 Several high-ranking British officers were renowned for eschewing insignia on their regular ...


2

Most patches on a gi are sewn on in the same way that they are for military uniforms so if there is a base near by, then there should be tailors or other such shops that should offer basic services such as sewing patches on uniforms, or on a gi. In terms of keeping them from actually coming off, if you them sewn on by someone else, they will most likely ...


2

Back when I trained more, I was nicknamed "tidal-wave" because of the amount that I sweat. A few tips I used: 1) wear an undershirt. Not fun when it's 8 zillion degrees out in the middle of summer, but it works well. 2) stash a small dishtowel up your sleeve. Between sets/exercises, dab at the sweat with the towel. 3) bring your gi to class and wear ...



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