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14

Interesting... Assumptions Consider for a moment the "Chainsaw-Wielding Killer" of your apparent nightmares. Assume, for a moment, a weight of approximately 8.3 lbs. (Roughly 7.4 lbs. for a lightweight chainsaw, another .9 lbs. for fuel, using the Stihl MS 192 C-E as a guide) – roughly twice the weight of a european bastard sword. Said killer could: ...


13

Okay, after reflection, I'm going to try to answer this with the respect it deserves: Firearms became a part of military life in China in the late 12th century, as the invention of gunpowder led to the development of portable cannonry. This sort of firearm and others were introduced and adopted by the Japanese sometime in the 15th century. The musket was ...


13

Honestly, you'll never look like the movies. Fights suck. They are sweaty, messy, and bloody things that nobody really wins. The best way to win a fight is to avoid the confrontation entirely. Flashy moves don't (often) win you the fight, and people you are trying to defend yourself from tend to be harder to take down than you would like. A strong kick ...


12

I would disagree with the premise that firearms arent in the 'martial arts' world. Firearm training most definitely falls into the category of martial arts. It may just not immediately be recognized as what we typically consider to be a 'martial art' because its not surrounded by the trappings of Japanese/Chinese technique names, uniforms, and cultural ...


12

There's this art form called Running. It defends against almost any handheld, especially heavy, melee weaponry. How to defend using Running Observe position of chainsaw and its wielder. Distance yourself out of arms (+ chainsaw) reach: this should be some six to eight feet. Turn away from the chainsaw. Engage feet and quads in Running. Do not stop until ...


12

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer nor do I play one on TV. So, whatever I say has no legal value whatsoever. That said... The law is a complex beast and unless you are a good criminal defence lawyer whatever you think you know about self defence is probably wrong, or at best incomplete. Laws change country to country, state to state, and even county to ...


10

The Kubotan (a trademarked name for what's otherwise called eda koppo or the similar yawara) is effectively a force amplifier, as you said. It's limited only truly by an individual's understanding of the weapon. Uses Striking By holding the kubotan in the middle of the fist, it acts as a fist-load. By laying the stick along the thumb, and using the thumb ...


9

Okinawan kobudo (weapons training) has a short-spear and shield combination called the tinbe (shield) and rochin (shortspear). Purportedly, the shield was made of a tortoise shell, which is now illegal, causing modern versions to be made from plastic. The tradition of Okinawan weapons is often associated with Okinawan and Japanese karate but it is also ...


8

Usually, it's enough to give a light sanding with fine grit sandpaper and a rub down with boiled linseed oil. It's important to use boiled linseed oil, as it will properly permeate the wood. If they were meant more for decoration or a trophy after years of service, and no longer intended to be used, a light varnish will give them a beautiful luster. ...


8

The situation of TKD is very similar to that of Shotokan karate (and indeed since TKD comes mostly from Shotokan karate). In Shotokan, you will occasionally see some weapons being taught, such as the nunchaku, tonfa, sai, and sword. But those weapons aren't in Shotokan's syllabus. Each instructor had to learn them from someone who knows Okinawan or Japanese ...


8

Thrusting AND Slashing are both useful It might "seem" slashing is more powerful because it involves bigger movements, and depending on the weapon, you feel, in your arm, that you're getting more force... but... it's not. Thrusting concentrates more force onto a smaller point, allowing better penetration. Stabbing weapons tend to cause more lethal ...


8

In a case where you have to face more than one opponent, in a case where putting someone into submission is not enough to end the fight: If you're more comfortable with the idea of using submissions, then you can train for that: arts/skills such as Chin-Na, some schools of jujitsu, hapkido, aikido... all teach joint locks that let you control one ...


7

Polypropylene works well for shorter stuff, but people complain about longer weapons because of an excess of flexibility (I tend to agree). For example, my Cold Steel Escrima Sticks are pretty great and have held up well, although they've been part-time, and they're short. They make a number of training swords with the same material. I'm not sure how ...


7

I would say that they have become part of martial arts in the greater sense of martial arts. By this I mean in training relating to war. It is just a very vague and unstructured one. All military and police forces will teach firearms use. There are set movement and training regimes -- very similar to kata in hand to hand and ranged weapon styles. Body ...


7

My suggestion, based purely on experience as a wood worker, would be that octagonal staffs would traditionally have been easier to make. The machines we have available these days can bang out nice round dowel pretty easy, but once upon a time, these things would have been make by hand using tools like planes and draw knives. Using tools like that, an ...


7

Krabi Krabong the tradtional weapons art from Thailand has a panoply of arms, including different shields. The shields are usually combined with offensive weapons. During a fight/show the participants often switch weapons/shields or pick up weapons others dropped. Thus many combinations are possible.


7

In general yes, it's better to start out with a light weapon as you have to learn the forms and techniques first, without being concerned about injuring yourself with a heavy or real weapon. Usually you would learn the techniques with a wooden version of the weapon while at the same time learning how to strengthen the arms, wrist and fingers in style and ...


7

Just because a karate style may include weapon katas does not mean that the name "karate" is invalidated. You can think of Kobudo as an extension, or sister art(s) to Karate. Okinawan weapon arts are supposed to have been based on farming tools that the practitioners would have had readily available. Additionally, as has been noted elsewhere, Kara in the ...


6

Wounding deeply from a distance--that's pretty much the job description of spears, pikes, yari, and the 57 other varieties of pointy pole weapons. Their "stand off" nature lets you deliver aggressive thrusts from the relative safety of several meters back. If needed, you can quickly move the weapon through a double-cone of positions for blocking. So, yes. ...


6

It's a somewhat contrived question, but I will answer as if it wasn't. a chainsaw (even a smaller one) has a reasonable weight, if you cannot out sprint the attacker then you clearly need to do some work on your fitness (note I'm excluding the fact you might be injured (maybe chainsaw guy already removed one of your legs?!!)). a chainsaw is similar to any ...


6

Reasons to Study Weapons I - improved coordination Training with weapons improves your coordination in ways that only controlling something that you don't have nerve endings in can. II - weapons of opportunity It's not just a stick. It's also, potentially, a sword, or a baseball bat, or a lead pipe. By training with a stick, you're also training with ...


6

Application of force. A weapon is a force multiplier. It lets you do more damage to your opponent, with less effort and exertion, in a shorter period of time, while exposing you to less danger of damage yourself. Having trained with weapons can help you in a self defense situation. This is particularly true if you have trained in weapons that can be ...


6

The answer to many of your questions is "Yes, with qualifications and probably not the way you're thinking of, if you're using movies as your reference". Movie Cheats Awareness In movies, the heroes take on 3 guys coming from different directions without any problem - they turn at just the right time, or maybe they throw a backhand or rear kick, they duck ...


6

Shields were used historically in Chinese martial arts, made of woven stems such as rattan, or wood covered in leather, in various sizes and designs. In Shaolin Kung-Fu, a round rattan shield (Tengpai) is sometimes used with the single-edged sword (dao). References: Photo above from https://mastershifusays.wordpress.com/ Ancient Chinese Weapons: A ...


6

There's two goals here, and they don't necessarily overlap. Less harmful techniques The techniques less likely to result in serious injury or death for your opponent(s) are to restrain them. Unfortunately, restraining them requires tying up part of your body to do so - limiting your mobility and your ability to defend yourself against others. These ...


5

Fascinating question; I'd like to know the answer. I found one potential answer:"The octagonal cut of all the staffs also gives you nice surface contours for locks and submissions." Several sources (none of which are reliable enough to quote) imply that octagonal weapons are associated with Okinawan martial arts, but that seems to be in the context of the ...


5

When I was training staff, my instructor started with having us measure the length of the staff and putting a piece of electrical tape exactly in the center. That made it easy to tell if you were drifting during the technique and helped trained where you place your hands while twirling it. You can also try a piece of string or something else along those ...


5

I'm very pleased with Autrelle Holland's Aiki-jo manual, which contains the Suburi and Kihon (I believe those are what you refer to as "small kata". I've also been impressed with Stanford Aikido's discussion of the Jo Suburi, which contains some very precise, practical advice and a wonderful sense of humor. Of course for video the Saito Aiki-Ken and ...


5

There are a number of video resources available. As was pointed out in the comments depending on your style (and even instructor) there may be small changes. I included most of the ones I've been taught over the years. My instructors were generally influenced by Saito Sensei. For Jo: 31 Count Jo Kata 13 Count Jo Kata (Saito) 20 Jo Suburi (basic attacks) ...


5

Sorry if this is a vague answer, and I don't know the first thing about the Seido karate style, but I remember an instructor (I can't remember what style. Kajukenbo, perhaps?) at a martial arts camp once telling me that they only taught weapons at black belt level to avoid weapons bias. The idea was that a practitioner should be fully proficient in empty ...



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