Hot answers tagged

9

In a case where you have to face more than one opponent, in a case where putting someone into submission is not enough to end the fight: If you're more comfortable with the idea of using submissions, then you can train for that: arts/skills such as Chin-Na, some schools of jujitsu, hapkido, aikido... all teach joint locks that let you control one ...


7

There's two goals here, and they don't necessarily overlap. Less harmful techniques The techniques less likely to result in serious injury or death for your opponent(s) are to restrain them. Unfortunately, restraining them requires tying up part of your body to do so - limiting your mobility and your ability to defend yourself against others. These ...


4

This is more of an aside than a full answer (but too long and with links not well handled by comments), but it is worth noting that the traditional Katanas evolved in a region where the naturally available iron was both rarer than in many areas in Europe and of lower quality. While the famed folding process does have other effects, one of the most ...


4

This 2007 interview with Dr. Rick Vinci, a Stanford-trained materials scientist and engineer at Lehigh University, by NOVA does a good job of describing both the materials science and engineering of the samurai sword. The sword is an excellent example of people, first of all, understanding the requirements of the particular application. Understanding ...


4

From a Historic European Martial Arts (HEMA) perspective, you have some options open to you: Punch you opponent. Drop your lower hand and use that hand for punching, while maintaining pressure on the sticks with your other hand. Grab your opponent's weapon with your lower hand, then go to town using the short end of your stick, the point of your stick, or ...


3

Sticks don't "get stuck". There's no cross guard to catch the main body of the weapon. If you ended up in a position of stick vs. stick without momentum, it would break into a different position very quickly: You can grab their stick for a disarm, lock, or to open them for an attack (and you'd probably want to do so before they do the same to you) You ...


3

The question is not well phrased. It's like asking "Which is a better tool: hammer or screwdriver?" (Answer: it depends...) The better question is "which is a more effective martial arts technique?" There is no historical basis to support the claim that slashing weapons were generally cavalry weapons. Here are some relevant historical examples: Swords ...


3

There are a few forms in Tenshinsho-den Katori Shinto ryu. I know they exist, but was not able to progress to that level in my local school. Here is a link to a video of the style. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2xmfyZSn80


3

Not only can it be done, but it has been done and you can watch it: https://www.youtube.com/results?q=man%20at%20arms%20katana&sm=1 In the TV show "Man at arms, reforged", when they do katanas, they do the folding and tempering but with power tools instead of hand hammers, recently designed clays, and modern furnaces and chemical treatments (in this ...


3

It would largely depend on the chainsaw. What most people seem to forget is that a chainsaw is a tool designed to either cut an immobile target(trees) or light targets(shrubbery). A regular chainsaw is not expected to block anything, cut through everything or cut indefinitely. thus striking the saw likely destroys or deforms the rail (or at least ...


3

Choy li fut Kung fu has 42 weapons. At my school you can request to learn a weapon of your choice. For instance a friend of mine asked to learn the double axes, so our Sifu learnt the form and taught it to him. I've already learnt the staff, double daggers, spear, two section staff, sabre and double ended spear after 5 years (obviously you need skill with ...


3

It is very Subjective ! If you are medieval kind guy go for hema! Most of people use longsword but you also have rapiers(a lot of kinds out there as they were a very popular duel sword, also variations: rapier and buckler, rapier and dagger , rapier and cape), sword and buckler, dagger ( and shield or buckler) , big two handed sword ( you can't use them ...


2

Personally I've never been concerned for the opponents live. Remember they are the one attacking you! I say that with tongue in cheek. Because as you know you should be doing everything in your power to defuse or remove yourself from the situation. Now if you are find yourself within a fight use enough force as you feel is needed to protect yourself. I know ...


2

http://www.wired.com/2001/02/dragonslayer/ Wired magazine published this article, about the advances of modern science in metallurgy, and how a professor and his team demonstrated this by forging a (better) sword then by traditional methods. They named this project the 'Dragon Slayer' - i.e.; blade to slay dragons! Very interesting read. The short answer ...


2

After a bit of searching to find the right thickness and weight, I found that a replacement garden tool handle from the hardware store works really well since it has a lot of the same requirements in terms of lightness and strength. It's also looks and feels pretty nice since it's stained and laquered. I'm fairly happy with the result. I replaced the barb ...


2

The Indian MA Kalaripayattu focuses on weapons and includes shield combined with various weapons, to include sword and spear.


2

The actual way to win a street fight with minimum injuries is to not fight at all. In fact, if you are faced with a choice or situation that would put you on the spot for a brawl, the first thing that you should always do is to flee or negotiate with words. Only on occasion that there is no choice and there is a chance to win, I guess you should do ...


2

Half swording. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Half-sword There is no space in a basket hilt to use two hands, so the second hand would be on the blade. It became more common with all swords as armour improved.


2

Asian Fighting Arts by Donn F. Draeger and Robert W. Smith is a good survey of martial arts from Asia. The original, published in 1969, is a little dated, but should give you an idea of the history, content, and weapons used by Asian martial arts systems. This was republished as Comprehensive Asian Fighting Arts in 1980. I don't know how the content of the ...


2

First, in iwama ryu we have lot of contacts with stabbing (tsuki) so it would be less dangerous to stab with blunt kisaki. Second, there are go no awase and shichi no awase which are parrying techniques, practitioner should parring in proper way, if he parry wrong he will punch on top of the opponent bokken on his blunt kisaki and instructor will hear that ...


2

As no specific region was specified in the question, this answer applies exclusively to Canada. Perhaps similar provisions exists in other legal systems, however. In Canada, the law allows you to openly carry a knife of pretty much any size, as long as it conforms to these points of the Criminal Code Article 84 : Prohibited weapon means (a) a knife ...


2

What martial art should I try if I want to train with a wide variety of weapons? Probably the HEMA arts. Fiore de’i Liberi in "The Flower of Battle" for example covers everything from unarmed hand to hand combat through to mounted armoured combat and virtually everything in between. unarmed, dagger/knives, baton, swords (one and two handed), axe ...


2

There can be a few reasons for this: It could be coated in fake chrome or even genuinely chrome plated. If the original metal looked very shiny and reflective, then that's probably what it was. In this case, if you scrape the outer material off, you'll be left with the base metal or primer paint coat. It's not rust, just kind of black or grey. It can turn ...


1

I really don't know how to explain this. The movies are there for entertainment. Everything you see there is entertainment and has little to no relationship to reality. Please don't think that you can look at anything you see in any movie and assume it in any way represents anything which has or does or would happen in reality. Scholagladiatoria on this ...


1

This is going to depend highly on your particular region's laws, be them at the city, county, state, province, or country level. And the laws change from time to time. It's hard to know for sure what's allowed. The other thing to keep in mind is that even if a weapon is legal, if you go to court on homicide or assault charges, even if it was clearly ...


1

Historically speaking, there wouldn't be much overlap between the us of the half-swording technique and the advent of the basket-hilted sword. Half-swording was typically used with a longsword by heavily armored combatants. The basket-hilt arose once technology had advanced to the point that heavy armor began to fall out of favor. The basket-hilt itself ...


1

You can't go wrong with the tried and true Millwall brick.


1

I'll give you both the "ideal but still probably illegal" answer, and the more realistic answer. Smashing weapons - still probably illegal If you can't have edged weapons, a stick or club is a great tool. It gives you reach, leverage, and can smash bones. If you want a short pocket weapon, then you want brass knuckles. Personally, if I had the choice, ...


1

This is a vast undertaking... Tomiki's On Modern Jujutsu paper is not a bad place to start for how Aikido and Judo evolved from the myriad of old Japanese ryu. It breaks down ancient jujutsu into four categories: Nage-waza (throwing techniques) Katame-waza (locking techniques) Atemi-waza (striking techniques) Kansetsu-waza (joint techniques) I would add ...


1

Simply, smaller surface area concentrates force. This becomes more important when your foes wear armor, as you want small surface area hits to break the bones in vital combat areas, like wrists, and feet, both which can not be armored well if mobility has to be retained, but where a hardened piece of rawhide would simply glance the blows from a round weapon ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible