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14

Interesting... Assumptions Consider for a moment the "Chainsaw-Wielding Killer" of your apparent nightmares. Assume, for a moment, a weight of approximately 8.3 lbs. (Roughly 7.4 lbs. for a lightweight chainsaw, another .9 lbs. for fuel, using the Stihl MS 192 C-E as a guide) – roughly twice the weight of a european bastard sword. Said killer could: ...


12

There's this art form called Running. It defends against almost any handheld, especially heavy, melee weaponry. How to defend using Running Observe position of chainsaw and its wielder. Distance yourself out of arms (+ chainsaw) reach: this should be some six to eight feet. Turn away from the chainsaw. Engage feet and quads in Running. Do not stop until ...


7

The situation of TKD is very similar to that of Shotokan karate (and indeed since TKD comes mostly from Shotokan karate). In Shotokan, you will occasionally see some weapons being taught, such as the nunchaku, tonfa, sai, and sword. But those weapons aren't in Shotokan's syllabus. Each instructor had to learn them from someone who knows Okinawan or Japanese ...


7

Just because a karate style may include weapon katas does not mean that the name "karate" is invalidated. You can think of Kobudo as an extension, or sister art(s) to Karate. Okinawan weapon arts are supposed to have been based on farming tools that the practitioners would have had readily available. Additionally, as has been noted elsewhere, Kara in the ...


6

In general yes, it's better to start out with a light weapon as you have to learn the forms and techniques first, without being concerned about injuring yourself with a heavy or real weapon. Usually you would learn the techniques with a wooden version of the weapon while at the same time learning how to strengthen the arms, wrist and fingers in style and ...


6

It's a somewhat contrived question, but I will answer as if it wasn't. a chainsaw (even a smaller one) has a reasonable weight, if you cannot out sprint the attacker then you clearly need to do some work on your fitness (note I'm excluding the fact you might be injured (maybe chainsaw guy already removed one of your legs?!!)). a chainsaw is similar to any ...


5

As this is an extremely broad question, it befits an extremely broad answer. Any technique can be applied with varying degrees of success, whether armed or armored. Much of the kuden of the Bujinkan for instance is related to the sameness of arms and armor, and how techniques do not necessarily change with respect to equipment, and ultimately the goal of ...


5

Okinawan kobudo (weapons training) has a short-spear and shield combination called the tinbe (shield) and rochin (shortspear). Purportedly, the shield was made of a tortoise shell, which is now illegal, causing modern versions to be made from plastic. The tradition of Okinawan weapons is often associated with Okinawan and Japanese karate but it is also ...


5

Krabi Krabong the tradtional weapons art from Thailand has a panoply of arms, including different shields. The shields are usually combined with offensive weapons. During a fight/show the participants often switch weapons/shields or pick up weapons others dropped. Thus many combinations are possible.


5

Thrusting AND Slashing are both useful It might "seem" slashing is more powerful because it involves bigger movements, and depending on the weapon, you feel, in your arm, that you're getting more force... but... it's not. Thrusting concentrates more force onto a smaller point, allowing better penetration. Stabbing weapons tend to cause more lethal ...


4

It all comes back to the question: What are you trying to do? If you're training in sword fighting, then use a sword. Just repeat the same sword cut over and over again. Try to go as fast as you can without losing accuracy. Repeat. In some amount of time, your forearms will tire. When they tire so much that either you're starting to slow down or you're ...


4

It's going to depend on your instructor and art, and how they promote weapons within the art. Traditional Korean weapons include spear variations (traditional spear, one similar to a naginata, trident, etc), bow, sword variations, a nunchaku variant, and the staff. Whether or not these are part of the curriculum at your dojang is variable. For example, many ...


4

Taekwondo quite literally translates as the art of kicking and punching. You can certainly stylise that translation, but that's what it means. The reason TKD doesn't focus that much on weapons is probably because it's quite a modern art, having been founded in the 1960's ( or was it the 1950's?) when people were shooting at each other with firearms, as ...


4

Just a brief introductory list for you: 肥後古流 Higo ko-ryū 天道流 Tendo-ryū 戸田派武甲流 Toda-ha Bukō-ryū 九鬼神伝流 kukishinden-ryū 日下捕手開山竹内流 Hinoshita Toride Kaizan Takenouchi-ryū 立身流 Tatsumi-ryū, 水鷗流 Suiō-ryū 柳生心眼流 Yagyū Shingan-ryū 天真正伝香取神道流 Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū 鹿島新当流 Kashima Shintō-ryū 馬庭念流 Maniwa Nen-ryū 駒川改心流 Komagawa Kaishin-ryū 鹿島神流 ...


4

This might make a few people here unhappy, but I would say look into Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) and other western martial arts systems. There are three kinds of SCA weapons combat categories. Heavy list/Weapons. This is the modern sport equivalent of medieval combat. It is fought with armor, either 1 on 1 (tourney) or group vs group (melee). ...


4

Scianóireacht (Pronounced SKEE un a rakt) was basically just the Irish term for knife fighting in general, as are the rest of the terms. Other than some possible adaptations for the local "flavor" in the style of how the knife was crafted, there isn't anything that makes any of it uniquely Gaelic. Much of original Gaelic fighting was based upon the ...


4

At a guess, any of the Escrima/Kali guys that like the dog brothers. http://dogbrothers.com/ Their sparring is geared for a semi no rules with weapons ( often wearing protective gear similar to armour ) see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CELN-DQI5qc


4

I've actually learned more (in longsword) from a heavier weapon than I have from a lighter weapon. The key with longsword is to learn how to use the handle as a lever, and nothing teaches that like weight. It's very easy to tell when you're brute forcing a cut, as opposed to levering it with weight. Using a light sword, it's possible to do things that ...


4

It is definitely best to start with a light weapon at slow speed. You must give your body time to adjust to different movements and you must give your brain time to adjust to different techniques. When using a light weapon you are able to cheat (using improper techniques) so by going slow you provide yourself with the time to make conscious choices about ...


4

First off I think it our choice of trainingweapon depends on whether you want to start practicing on your own, or join a club. If you are planning to join a club, I'd say wait and see what they are using. Some clubs prefer steel other nylon wasters. This might save you the costs of new/additional gear ;). Also, and this might be different from club to club, ...


3

For any kind of a weapon like this, whether it is a sword, staff, knife, chainsaw, axe, you name it, you want to be one of two places: Outside its range - Obviously if you are outside the range of the weapon + the wielders reach, then they can't hit you with it (Short of throwing it). Being outside the reach of the weapon also gives you the opportunity to ...


3

A brick to the head is a great counter to a chainsaw. Or to anything, come to think of it. Update: Since I am forced to give more than one line answers, let me explain: a brick can be thrown. It is hard and heavy and can crush the skull of the chainsaw wielder. If your skull is crushed, you will die. If you are dead, you can't attack people with chainsaws ...


3

The use of the Naginata in martial arts, naginatajutsu, is practiced in Bujinkan, Koryū (古流) and Kobudō (古武道) schools.


3

It really will depend on the art, and what types of weapons you would like to learn. For example, I currently take taekwondo, and we utilize the following weapons (Not all of which are traditionally Korean): 6' staff - mid and long range forms. Single and double bangh mang ee (escrima) single and double ssangh jeol bangh (nunchaku) ssangh nat (kama) jee ...


3

With a thrust, I have all of the weight and power of the weapon behind the striking point. It's going to archive MUCH more power, and pressure. Also it takes up less space than a slash. To slash, you have to create a large amount if movement, not to mention getting the angle perfectly correct (which takes years of practice)


2

In general a slightly modified shadow box (like one that used to display war medals) might work depending on the size/kind of weapons. If money is not an object, I would suggest commissioning one from a carpenter who can also set in glass. In terms of protecting and preserving the weapons, the case alone will not be enough. The weapons will need to be ...


2

There are a few options: Kobudo - traditional Japanese weapons style so you will use weapons like: jo, bo, hanbo, tonfa, kama, katana, nunchucks Traditional Jiu Jitsu - should include level at some point depending on the school Filipino Martial Arts - most of them start off with weapons and work with sticks, knives, kerambit, various swords and some have ...


2

There are a few things at issue here: Space - If space is at a minimum, typically I would look at wall mounting. In this case, you're looking at a cabinet with a glass or perspex front. A long wall may be required for pole arms, but typically you're looking at 3" deep hooks to support the item, which would mean you'd want a 4-5" deep frame. I would ...


2

Good armor will protect the user against a lot throws. The protection is provide not only from impact resistance of the armor, but also the additional mass, and size the armor gives to the body. Multiple that by two if both are in armor. By way of example, and speaking somewhat generally: The arm cannon (forearm, elbow & upper arm as one piece) will ...


2

If my walking staff is smooth round and shiney,then my hand is sliding up and down all over the place, the more sides to the staff the better the grasp or hold I have to steady myself as I walk. I find the octagonal staff the best walking aid that allows my hand to stay firmly in one place on the staff or easily adjust up or down.



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