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13

Honestly, you'll never look like the movies. Fights suck. They are sweaty, messy, and bloody things that nobody really wins. The best way to win a fight is to avoid the confrontation entirely. Flashy moves don't (often) win you the fight, and people you are trying to defend yourself from tend to be harder to take down than you would like. A strong kick ...


9

In a case where you have to face more than one opponent, in a case where putting someone into submission is not enough to end the fight: If you're more comfortable with the idea of using submissions, then you can train for that: arts/skills such as Chin-Na, some schools of jujitsu, hapkido, aikido... all teach joint locks that let you control one ...


7

There's two goals here, and they don't necessarily overlap. Less harmful techniques The techniques less likely to result in serious injury or death for your opponent(s) are to restrain them. Unfortunately, restraining them requires tying up part of your body to do so - limiting your mobility and your ability to defend yourself against others. These ...


6

The answer to many of your questions is "Yes, with qualifications and probably not the way you're thinking of, if you're using movies as your reference". Movie Cheats Awareness In movies, the heroes take on 3 guys coming from different directions without any problem - they turn at just the right time, or maybe they throw a backhand or rear kick, they duck ...


6

Shields were used historically in Chinese martial arts, made of woven stems such as rattan, or wood covered in leather, in various sizes and designs. In Shaolin Kung-Fu, a round rattan shield (Tengpai) is sometimes used with the single-edged sword (dao). References: Photo above from https://mastershifusays.wordpress.com/ Ancient Chinese Weapons: A ...


4

No. Fights do not go down like in the movies, or like in the dojo. They are chaotic, messy, and brief. They are usually decided, one way or the other, in the first few seconds of a fight. Involving a weapon is especially dangerous. Surviving a knife encounter (notice I didn't say "fight") usually still results in several cuts to the survivor's arms. If ...


4

The most recent reference I've found, from 2007, indicates that tinted sunglasses may indeed block the effect, although it seems like the disorientation effect may still be effective.


4

When I bought my wooden Jian from Tigersden, it came with a very detailed instructions on how to treat them, so that it would increase their lifetime and durability. In a nutshell there are two main methods that are slightly different, but both should yield good results. Both rely on applying oil to the wood. Teak or linseed oil was suggested by the Graham ...


4

When I was doing Doce Pares Escrima several years ago, I ran into the same problem. I used cloth athletic/medical tape to cover up the blistered areas to give them a chance to heal and at one point, when I found that it was a particular part of the stick rubbing up against my hand (an area where the lacquer had gotten roughed up from impact, actually), I put ...


4

This is more of an aside than a full answer (but too long and with links not well handled by comments), but it is worth noting that the traditional Katanas evolved in a region where the naturally available iron was both rarer than in many areas in Europe and of lower quality. While the famed folding process does have other effects, one of the most ...


4

This 2007 interview with Dr. Rick Vinci, a Stanford-trained materials scientist and engineer at Lehigh University, by NOVA does a good job of describing both the materials science and engineering of the samurai sword. The sword is an excellent example of people, first of all, understanding the requirements of the particular application. Understanding ...


3

Not only can it be done, but it has been done and you can watch it: https://www.youtube.com/results?q=man%20at%20arms%20katana&sm=1 In the TV show "Man at arms, reforged", when they do katanas, they do the folding and tempering but with power tools instead of hand hammers, recently designed clays, and modern furnaces and chemical treatments (in this ...


3

which martial arts is for you a "movie like" art? All of them and none of them. Movies are pretend. Fight choreographers will take whatever moves look good and film it from the best angle - regardless of the efficacy of the move or the art it came from. beating multiple opponents often with one hit for each guy...is that even possible? Yes it ...


3

There are a few forms in Tenshinsho-den Katori Shinto ryu. I know they exist, but was not able to progress to that level in my local school. Here is a link to a video of the style. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2xmfyZSn80


3

The question is not well phrased. It's like asking "Which is a better tool: hammer or screwdriver?" (Answer: it depends...) The better question is "which is a more effective martial arts technique?" There is no historical basis to support the claim that slashing weapons were generally cavalry weapons. Here are some relevant historical examples: Swords ...


3

It would largely depend on the chainsaw. What most people seem to forget is that a chainsaw is a tool designed to either cut an immobile target(trees) or light targets(shrubbery). A regular chainsaw is not expected to block anything, cut through everything or cut indefinitely. thus striking the saw likely destroys or deforms the rail (or at least ...


3

Blisters can happen initially. I think it happens to everyone new to stick fighting. It's nothing to be too worried about. It probably just means you were over-eager in your training and went too hard or too long. No big deal. It can also happen if you don't train regularly. Like if you just go once a week, your hand never gets used to it, so you get ...


2

After a bit of searching to find the right thickness and weight, I found that a replacement garden tool handle from the hardware store works really well since it has a lot of the same requirements in terms of lightness and strength. It's also looks and feels pretty nice since it's stained and laquered. I'm fairly happy with the result. I replaced the barb ...


2

The Indian MA Kalaripayattu focuses on weapons and includes shield combined with various weapons, to include sword and spear.


2

http://www.wired.com/2001/02/dragonslayer/ Wired magazine published this article, about the advances of modern science in metallurgy, and how a professor and his team demonstrated this by forging a (better) sword then by traditional methods. They named this project the 'Dragon Slayer' - i.e.; blade to slay dragons! Very interesting read. The short answer ...


2

The actual way to win a street fight with minimum injuries is to not fight at all. In fact, if you are faced with a choice or situation that would put you on the spot for a brawl, the first thing that you should always do is to flee or negotiate with words. Only on occasion that there is no choice and there is a chance to win, I guess you should do ...


2

Personally I've never been concerned for the opponents live. Remember they are the one attacking you! I say that with tongue in cheek. Because as you know you should be doing everything in your power to defuse or remove yourself from the situation. Now if you are find yourself within a fight use enough force as you feel is needed to protect yourself. I know ...


1

Yes. For a more nuanced answer, a lot of it gets into what you consider to be a katana. Presently, it is extremely difficult to make a katana in Japan, as swordmaking was highly regulated post-WW2. During WW2, katana were machine-forged or sometimes even stamped, but they were for display, and were indeed inferior. Tool steel and high speed steel are ...


1

As Sean said, nito ryu teach the way to fight with a katana and a wakizashi, but in real fight, on a ground battle, a samurai could use those technique with a second full sized katana. I practised it and i don't remember any technique which wouldn't work with two katana. There is some Kenjutsu Dojo that are able to teach it if you wanna try it


1

How to win a street fight without putting anyone's life in danger? The only way to win a street fight without putting anyone's life at risk is to avoid fighting altogether. •Does knocking someone out by leading a punch to the chin (or somewhere else on the head) is willing to be lethal ? Despite what Hollywood would have us believe, being ...


1

The best way to fight is always by "without fighting". Negotiate and talk your way through because your ultimate aim is not getting yourself (or your friends) hurt. If you have the option to run/escape, do so! Is it ok to break someone's arm (it won't kill him) if you are given the opportunity ? (Through a submission or something.). In the country ...


1

An interesting question. But all your options are deadly really. Why don't you think of back side kick or major punch in his stomach, and then move to the other one for a head punch and so .. A hit to the back of the leg, or on the exact nerve of the arm are also good options, all freeze the opponent and doesn't kill him. Yet he would leave you. Don't go ...


1

Key thing to think about is would you want to fight the same way? I observe multiple attackers in movies and notice that if i were in the same situation there is no way i would position and fight in the same way. watch carefully, ignore who wins and loses, just think would you do the same thing? Does it make sense? When you see a big spinning kick, im ...


1

Simply, smaller surface area concentrates force. This becomes more important when your foes wear armor, as you want small surface area hits to break the bones in vital combat areas, like wrists, and feet, both which can not be armored well if mobility has to be retained, but where a hardened piece of rawhide would simply glance the blows from a round weapon ...



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