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11

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer nor do I play one on TV. So, whatever I say has no legal value whatsoever. That said... The law is a complex beast and unless you are a good criminal defence lawyer whatever you think you know about self defence is probably wrong, or at best incomplete. Laws change country to country, state to state, and even county to ...


7

In general yes, it's better to start out with a light weapon as you have to learn the forms and techniques first, without being concerned about injuring yourself with a heavy or real weapon. Usually you would learn the techniques with a wooden version of the weapon while at the same time learning how to strengthen the arms, wrist and fingers in style and ...


7

The situation of TKD is very similar to that of Shotokan karate (and indeed since TKD comes mostly from Shotokan karate). In Shotokan, you will occasionally see some weapons being taught, such as the nunchaku, tonfa, sai, and sword. But those weapons aren't in Shotokan's syllabus. Each instructor had to learn them from someone who knows Okinawan or Japanese ...


7

Just because a karate style may include weapon katas does not mean that the name "karate" is invalidated. You can think of Kobudo as an extension, or sister art(s) to Karate. Okinawan weapon arts are supposed to have been based on farming tools that the practitioners would have had readily available. Additionally, as has been noted elsewhere, Kara in the ...


6

Application of force. A weapon is a force multiplier. It lets you do more damage to your opponent, with less effort and exertion, in a shorter period of time, while exposing you to less danger of damage yourself. Having trained with weapons can help you in a self defense situation. This is particularly true if you have trained in weapons that can be ...


5

Reasons to Study Weapons I - improved coordination Training with weapons improves your coordination in ways that only controlling something that you don't have nerve endings in can. II - weapons of opportunity It's not just a stick. It's also, potentially, a sword, or a baseball bat, or a lead pipe. By training with a stick, you're also training with ...


5

Thrusting AND Slashing are both useful It might "seem" slashing is more powerful because it involves bigger movements, and depending on the weapon, you feel, in your arm, that you're getting more force... but... it's not. Thrusting concentrates more force onto a smaller point, allowing better penetration. Stabbing weapons tend to cause more lethal ...


5

As a martial artist I have a bunch of weapons, but the two I use to protect my home are: myself kali stick(s) The first speaks for itself - you should be able to defend yourself and your property even without a weapon. In other words, you might not have a weapon available or you may have been disarmed - you should still be capable of defending ...


5

It is definitely best to start with a light weapon at slow speed. You must give your body time to adjust to different movements and you must give your brain time to adjust to different techniques. When using a light weapon you are able to cheat (using improper techniques) so by going slow you provide yourself with the time to make conscious choices about ...


5

I've actually learned more (in longsword) from a heavier weapon than I have from a lighter weapon. The key with longsword is to learn how to use the handle as a lever, and nothing teaches that like weight. It's very easy to tell when you're brute forcing a cut, as opposed to levering it with weight. Using a light sword, it's possible to do things that ...


4

It all comes back to the question: What are you trying to do? If you're training in sword fighting, then use a sword. Just repeat the same sword cut over and over again. Try to go as fast as you can without losing accuracy. Repeat. In some amount of time, your forearms will tire. When they tire so much that either you're starting to slow down or you're ...


4

First off I think it our choice of trainingweapon depends on whether you want to start practicing on your own, or join a club. If you are planning to join a club, I'd say wait and see what they are using. Some clubs prefer steel other nylon wasters. This might save you the costs of new/additional gear ;). Also, and this might be different from club to club, ...


4

It's going to depend on your instructor and art, and how they promote weapons within the art. Traditional Korean weapons include spear variations (traditional spear, one similar to a naginata, trident, etc), bow, sword variations, a nunchaku variant, and the staff. Whether or not these are part of the curriculum at your dojang is variable. For example, many ...


4

Taekwondo quite literally translates as the art of kicking and punching. You can certainly stylise that translation, but that's what it means. The reason TKD doesn't focus that much on weapons is probably because it's quite a modern art, having been founded in the 1960's ( or was it the 1950's?) when people were shooting at each other with firearms, as ...


3

What do you want out of your training? Should it part of a martial arts curriculum is almost impossible to answer, especially without knowing what exactly you want out of your training. As Marc MacYoung explains, there are 5 broad categories you can break out the goals of martial arts into. Self-defense is one of them, but as he also explains martial ...


3

Home Invasion vs. Burglary So first off, most of the people afraid of home invasion are rarely the ones targeted by it. Are you involved in criminal activity where you'd have large amounts of cash lying around? Are you from an immigrant culture that would normally hide money stashes in the house? If you answered no to both of those, you are extremely ...


3

For home defense, you are contemplating weapon use within a constrained space. Long weapons do not make a lot of sense; you will not be able to use them well. I would also advise against bladed or piercing weapons of any kind. They are by definition lethal weapons, with a clear intent to maim or kill. While the Castle Doctrine and, in some places, stand ...


3

With a thrust, I have all of the weight and power of the weapon behind the striking point. It's going to archive MUCH more power, and pressure. Also it takes up less space than a slash. To slash, you have to create a large amount if movement, not to mention getting the angle perfectly correct (which takes years of practice)


2

Can you run? A chainsaw is a deadly weapon that can severely injure, mutilate or kill you with a single touch. So if you are not 100% confident that you can beat the attacker easily, you should run. The weight of the chainsaw alone will ensure that the attacker will be slower than you. In addition the chainsaw is difficult to hold and will force the ...


2

To help understand the difference between a thrust and a slash, consider some hopefully familiar movements: a cricket bat... if you "slash" with the bat you can hit a cricket ball 100 metres or more in the air, while if you prod at the ball with the end of the bat it might only go a few metres. On the other hand, if you had an everyday door to get through ...


2

I want to emphasize I am not an expert, but it is worth looking at history. Most of the real slashing weapons (scimitars, sabers) were designed to be used from horseback. Slashing was less likely to get the weapon stuck, which was an even bigger problem when on horseback then when fighting on foot. (The famous curve of the Katana which was largely used in ...


2

Context and understanding If you're working from an art that dates back to melee weaponry, then what that weapon training does for you is open up context to a lot of the movements you've been doing empty handed. Things like footwork, angles, range, the way in which you generate force, often were built entirely around a few primary weapons, the environment ...


2

I like the answers from all of the posters here. As a side note, I find it pretty interesting that the kubotan is not considered to be a weapon in Germany because I live in Canada and when I was visiting an amusement park, I had to remove my keys because the kubotan was not allowed in. The kubotan is certainly a weapon; however, anything can be used as a ...


1

I'm mainly interested in unarmed combat, but still highly value practice with weapons. Firstly, defending unarmed against a weapon forces you to do things you might not bother trying if the opponent wasn't armed that will never-the-less engender heightened reactions and awareness; honed reading of your opponent's posture, inertia/momentum, awareness and ...


1

When deciding on a self-defense weapon, the following checklist is useful: Easy to use Easy to swing around Easy to use in close-quarters, e.g. on the ground or with your back against a wall Able to neutralise an opponent with one or at most two hits Won't inflict deep wounds. Because you will get arrested if you stab someone. With this in mind, the best ...


1

First of all, please no. Just don't. And no, it will not be effective. Even given that there are some people that can tow trains by ropes in their teeth, you cannot clench your jaw enough to be able to hold on to it if someone hits the blade. It will spin out, and if you are lucky, leave your teeth behind. Second, despite what they show in cartoons, you ...


1

Practising sword play will improve your strength. Other exercises will help too. In the past I have found the most beneficial for hand strength to be finger tip press ups, pull ups and kettle bell use. All of these rely on hand strength. It is important to remember your body as a whole, bearing in mind that for for every contraction there is an expansion ...


1

Discalimer: I'm a novice in strength and conditioning, and I know just about nothing about sword training. General Strength First Activity-specific strength training is not a good idea until the student has already attained a basic level of whole-body strength. Therefore, instead of focusing on sword-specific strength training for specifically the arms, ...


1

Umm, not an expert but a few castles and armoury museums I've been to the medieval training swords were heavy (compared to the dao, jian, katana and other training weapons I've used). I suggest you try asking on http://www.thearma.org/ and if that doesn't help http://www.aemma.org/ (with sound turned off FFS)


1

I remember someone asked Chuck Norris how to fight a person who has a knife, he said if you get into a knife fight you are going to get stabbed. I'd say the same applies with just about anything; if you get into a fist fight with someone who is a really bad fighter, chances are they will still land a few. So if running is not an option, you need to do your ...



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