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What martial art should I try if I want to train with a wide variety of weapons? Probably the HEMA arts. Fiore de’i Liberi in "The Flower of Battle" for example covers everything from unarmed hand to hand combat through to mounted armoured combat and virtually everything in between. unarmed, dagger/knives, baton, swords (one and two handed), axe ...


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It is very Subjective ! If you are medieval kind guy go for hema! Most of people use longsword but you also have rapiers(a lot of kinds out there as they were a very popular duel sword, also variations: rapier and buckler, rapier and dagger , rapier and cape), sword and buckler, dagger ( and shield or buckler) , big two handed sword ( you can't use them ...


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I have previously trained in the Bujinkan style and they had a fair variety of weapons, although my schedule meant that I only attended a few classes where they were being taught. Weapons use is among the 18 disciplines taught in the Bujinkan: ken (sword), kodachi (short sword), jutte (sword breaker), tessen (iron fan), kabutowari (helmet breaker), bō ...


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Most Karate schools will include some Okinawan Kobudo in their curriculum. Usually, this means learning a few Bo (staff) forms, but you can find schools in which the Kobudo is more widely integrated. From my experience in Shorinji-Ryu Karatedo, the following weapons were taught very regularly : Bo (6' Staff) Jo (4' Staff) Tanbo (~2' escrima stick) Dual ...


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Choy li fut Kung fu has 42 weapons. At my school you can request to learn a weapon of your choice. For instance a friend of mine asked to learn the double axes, so our Sifu learnt the form and taught it to him. I've already learnt the staff, double daggers, spear, two section staff, sabre and double ended spear after 5 years (obviously you need skill with ...


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I really don't know how to explain this. The movies are there for entertainment. Everything you see there is entertainment and has little to no relationship to reality. Please don't think that you can look at anything you see in any movie and assume it in any way represents anything which has or does or would happen in reality. Scholagladiatoria on this ...


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I would not recommend letting go of the weapon unless you are close enough to be able to inflict lots of hurt before the opponent registers that you dropped the weapon. In this case you should be in a position to finish the fight (not just disarm them). Another option you have is: leaving your hand(s) in roughly the same spot, move the tip of the weapon ...


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From a Historic European Martial Arts (HEMA) perspective, you have some options open to you: Punch you opponent. Drop your lower hand and use that hand for punching, while maintaining pressure on the sticks with your other hand. Grab your opponent's weapon with your lower hand, then go to town using the short end of your stick, the point of your stick, or ...


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Sticks don't "get stuck". There's no cross guard to catch the main body of the weapon. If you ended up in a position of stick vs. stick without momentum, it would break into a different position very quickly: You can grab their stick for a disarm, lock, or to open them for an attack (and you'd probably want to do so before they do the same to you) You ...


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I'm no fencing/stickfighting expert, but some options that come to mind include: Kick your opponent Step or duck aside to open a new line of attack Slide your stick down theirs to strike their hand (if we are talking about sticks, not lightsabers) grab your opponent's weapon to disable it, then attack with your weapon, or disarm your opponent if ...


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First, if we are talking about sticks, we are not talking about fencing. Sticks do not come with hand guards, whereas fencing weapons do. Life is not like the movies. If we are talking about sticks, immediately upon parrying, you can slide your stick down your opponent's stick while maintaining contact to attack their hand/wrist. When someone gets whacked ...


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First, in iwama ryu we have lot of contacts with stabbing (tsuki) so it would be less dangerous to stab with blunt kisaki. Second, there are go no awase and shichi no awase which are parrying techniques, practitioner should parring in proper way, if he parry wrong he will punch on top of the opponent bokken on his blunt kisaki and instructor will hear that ...


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You can't go wrong with the tried and true Millwall brick.


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Just carry a pen. It can save your life. If your attacker has a knife, honestly I'd say forget the rules; you are evening your odds or otherwise going 6 ft under. You can legally carry a pen anywhere you want, including into a court room. A simple fountain pen is THE ultimate concealed weapon. I have one in my car and on me at all times. Don't just use it ...


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I'll give you both the "ideal but still probably illegal" answer, and the more realistic answer. Smashing weapons - still probably illegal If you can't have edged weapons, a stick or club is a great tool. It gives you reach, leverage, and can smash bones. If you want a short pocket weapon, then you want brass knuckles. Personally, if I had the choice, ...


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As no specific region was specified in the question, this answer applies exclusively to Canada. Perhaps similar provisions exists in other legal systems, however. In Canada, the law allows you to openly carry a knife of pretty much any size, as long as it conforms to these points of the Criminal Code Article 84 : Prohibited weapon means (a) a knife ...


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This is going to depend highly on your particular region's laws, be them at the city, county, state, province, or country level. And the laws change from time to time. It's hard to know for sure what's allowed. The other thing to keep in mind is that even if a weapon is legal, if you go to court on homicide or assault charges, even if it was clearly ...



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