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20

Several martial systems contain drills to improve sensitivity with varying degrees of systemisation and formality. As a result, they have a different flavour from the chi sao in Wing Chun, but they each have a similar purpose: to build sensitivity and awareness. Specific examples: Taiji has "push hands" drills that involve one or both hands. (YouTube ...


10

I like the other answers here. Let me just add my take on this subject. I hope I don't offend anyone here. Talking about a style's weaknesses is often a hot button subject. Wing Chun was developed with a particular purpose in mind. And that was to train someone as quickly as possible to be able to fight people who were trained in traditional kung-fu arts ...


9

Warm up with slow, high-precision, well-known moves You should warm up thoroughly, ending with light, smooth, slow movements that you've already mastered. From Tom Kurz' article, A Well-Run Workout: The Warm-Up: Warm-up regulates emotional states because the flow of impulses from working muscles (respective motor and sensory nerve centers, actually) ...


9

What you are asking for is a tall order. If you live on the ground floor, noise issues are more easily addressed because you don't have to worry about impact noises with the floor. Impact noises are the hardest to control, and they radiate through rigid structures like floor joists rather well. I have no affiliation with the site, but there are a great ...


9

Some of the comments to that youtube video correctly point out that the example of straight punching given in the video is not actually Wing Chun. If you take a look at a number of other Wing Chun videos you will see that not only is the punch delivered very differently, but also that Wing Chun practitioners will deliver a mix of punches, chops and open ...


7

When developing any technique, there are pairs of muscles that must work together. In the case of punching, and this kind of a punch, your recoil from the punch is just as important for absorbing the impact as the actual delivery itself. To practice the punch, start with the technique in open space and focus on delivering the energy of the punch to the ...


7

Reach is important I don't know about wing chun, but in boxing, arm length (reach) is considered a significant advantage independent of other factors. It's important enough to report the "wingspan" of each fighter before a fight, as part of comparing other physical attributes like height and weight. Generally speaking, many physical attributes are ...


7

Wing Chun is uncommon in MMA for three major reasons. First, its practitioners generally shun sparring. Second, its practitioners generally shun realistic wrestling, throwing, and groundwork practice. Third, the skill Wing Chun focuses the most time on--hand trapping--is a small part of fighting in general, and is easily overshadowed by boxing or clinch work ...


6

Orthodox wing chun focuses on "trapping" range, between striking range and the clinch. Within many schools' live training (sparring) there is often virtually no throwing, no shots, very little clinch work or kicking, and punching or other hand strikes are often only trained once contact has been made, leaving long-range boxing untrained. The style has ...


5

Excellent Question, @Jeroen. I have had the same problem for a long time. I am not a Wing Chun practitioner, but this has haunted me all my life throughout my Martial Arts study on all stand-up Martial Arts styles, but specially Aikido and BJJ. The interesting thing is that it was via Aikido and BJJ (and by that I mean, non-striking Martial Art) that I found ...


5

Things that recommend Wing Chun to a sailor: It is sometimes commented that Wing Chun is best suited for fighting in a telephone booth. This is not so far from the truth. Wing Chun specializes in close-quarters tactics at bent-arm range/trapping range (though I assure you it does possess long-range techniques and tactics). This would be well-suited to ...


4

I've been practising both Wong Shun Leung and Mai Gei Wong Wing Chun, and I had the same problems as you in the beginning. In both of these styles, early training was focused on getting the bare basics right. For example, we'd do a drill where we'd apply pressure to our partner's technique (say wu sau for example), just to train being relaxed in that ...


4

We utilise a drill where the kick is broken down into four stages. The stages are: Raise the knee (keeping the leg bent) Thrust the kick out, and hold it for a couple of seconds Return the kick to the position attained at the end of step #1 Place the foot back on the floor, so you are back in your stance (place the foot, don't just drop it) This is ...


4

Punches can cause injury to your wrist, if delivered incorrectly. Search the dragonfishpond channel on youtube for an explanation of the correct structural alignment of the fist. Cuinn Wylie is also correct in saying the CQC instructor is not using proper Wing Chun. He is striking without controlling the opponent's arms - which is very dangerous and can also ...


4

Wear protection Cant stress this enough Irrespective of what some schools may teach, it is detrimental to you and your well being to constantly increase your tenacity in hopes that your body would get "used to it" someday. Train smart. Master technique. If your body deteriorates, you have lost your primary weapon. Take care of your body at all costs.


4

Bleeding is a big deal. You are damaging yourself and that is bad. You should wear protective gear, improve your technique, and punch less hard. In addition, I hope you clean all the biohazard that you leaked on the bag...


4

Find and enroll in a wing chun school, then in a year test your skills in a full-contact competition. Tutorials are for learning how to set up your programming development environment. YouTube channels are for entertainment. Neither are training. Training is becoming an athlete by working out, learning skills, and entering competitions.


4

I agree with Dave Liepmann, that the only real way to learn a martial art is to have a teacher who can guide you. And you need to do it two or three times a week. But, let me offer a small amount of hope for you to learn wing-chun if you have no teacher present and no school around. If I was in your situation, and I knew that wing-chun was the only martial ...


4

This answer makes the assumption that you're talking about reaching down to block low kicks with your arms, which your question seems to indicate. In Wing Chun, the rule of thumb is that the hands address anything above the waist, and kicks anything below the waist, with some overlap in the groin region. If the kick is coming at your head you should be ...


4

I've been practicing Wing Chun (Wang Kiu lineage) for over a year now...having just been introduced a little to sparring with kicks allowed, I tend to try to automatically block kicks with my arms. Emphasis mine. This is your problem. Flinchy reactions to normal attacks is caused by either A) not knowing what to do or B) not sparring enough under ...


3

Yes, you should. You should also do it correctly: How to wrap your hands


3

Masutatsu Oyama (the founder of Kyukushin full-contact Karate and enemy of bulls everywhere) said later in his life that he regrets doing all that damage to his hands to "toughen them up". Granted, there is a bit of toughening that needs to be done, but it is mostly to increase the bone density of your hand, rather than the skin itself. This isn't something ...


3

While not what most would think of as a "weight lifting" exercise (body weight rather than external weights), push-ups on your fists will help with Wing Chun punches as it promotes strong wrists and forearms (along with the standard push-up muscles). In order to train for the explosiveness of the punch you can practice these push-ups with an explosive ...


3

I refer you to this question that I asked. There is a natural, proper way to use the body, and ... Other ways. A martial arts should follow the natural way and only enhance body movements and effectiveness, not put undue stress on the body. This goes for forms, striking techniques, and calisthenics. Training joints, tendons, ligaments - this is done ...


3

Any trained athlete, such as martial artists, will develop injuries due to accidents that will get worst over time. Joints are amongst the first thing to go because of the large amount of repeated motion that we use in all martial arts. However, if done safely martial arts pose no more dangers than any other sport. Remember to warm up, not over exert any ...


3

Shaolin (Chi Sim) Weng Chun (which is not the same style as Wing Chun) also has chi sao, although it's a bit more like Tai chi's pushing hands. Chi Sim Weng Chun has chi sao sets (looping through several certain moves following each other) as well as 'free' or open chi sao. It's a practice with semi-relaxed arms 'twirling' around each other where you try, ...


3

Practice when you are exhausted. When you are just too tiered to have tension, you will have none. After a while, your body will remember how to do it without tension -- since that is how you trained it. Note that this will not help you learn the movement and might be in fact counter productive to learning. However, once you know the move, it might be a ...


3

There are four distances at which we fight: Long range. You'll need to perform a jumping attack to close the distance. punching range. I'll lump kicking in here for simplicity. close quarters. This is where Wing Chun is very effective. grappling. Basically anything that is NOT close quarters fighting would be logically effective, but I wouldn't face a ...


3

The style matters less than who is teaching it. The same style can be taught very differently by different people. I would look for location first: your dojo/gym/training place should be within easy travel distance of where you are. I would say less than an hour's drive (both ways) but that might vary depending on how much you generally travel. Secondly, ...


3

May I also recommend doing Taichi along with whatever other martial art you decide to learn. You may have to search for a teacher who knows the martial arts side of Taichi, but generally when you do they are overjoyed to find a student interested in that aspect. Learning Taichi along with your martial art will work to fix up posture mis-alignments, free up ...



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