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24

Wing chun doesn't have to be bad for this school to be bad for you. It sounds like you're not comfortable there. I think you should stop training with these people.


11

Wing Chun is uncommon in MMA for three major reasons. First, its practitioners generally shun sparring. Second, its practitioners generally shun realistic wrestling, throwing, and groundwork practice. Third, the skill Wing Chun focuses the most time on--hand trapping--is a small part of fighting in general, and is easily overshadowed by boxing or clinch work ...


8

Do you have a bad Wing Chun teacher? I don't know, as it really does not sound at all like Wing Chun. Going back to its roots, Wing Chun is actually named for one of the early female practitioners of the art. It emphasizes techniques where the user flows around the enemy, as it is expected that the WC user would lose when facing an opponent head-on (...


4

Power in your punches comes from; muscle to generate force, correct shifting of weight/movement, and coordination and technique to get the most of that (alignment of structure, correct angle of attack, timing, etc.). If you want more muscle to generate force, you need to do some kind of resistance training - that can be weights, it could be resistance ...


4

The stance with the feet pointed inwards is known as Yee Jee Kim Yeung Ma & may be referred to as the "Pigeon-Toed" or "Goat riding" stance. It is a stance that is developed under the foundational form called Siu Nim Tao. This form is typically found in the Yip Man heritage schools (note there are other Wing Chun variations) which was popularized by ...


3

This depends on your particular school, because sash color and rank are not standardized across Wing Chun schools. Even in the same branch of Wing Chun, your school may have a different tradition than other schools in the same branch. Very simply, if your school of Wing Chun has everyone wearing the same color sash, then that means that sash color is not ...


3

As you mentioned, by your estimation, both schools are good. So it's really a question of your comfort level (do you feel you will definitely learn better from the more expensive school?) and your own finances. The right instruction and the right type of instructor for you can have you learn things almost ten times faster than poor instruction or bad fits ...


3

It is normal for Wing Chun sifus to hand off instruction to senior students. For example, despite popular conception, very little of Bruce Lee's Wing Chun training was given by Yip Man. I guess a better question is: do the senior students actually training you give you a lot of good, one-on-one, hands-on training in the "Old" school? Understand that the ...


3

Others have said it, I'll agree. Never work with a teacher who makes you uncomfortable. Always work with a teacher who is serving your needs, advancing your study and developing you in ways you both agree are good.


3

As with most things like this, you get out what you put in. There are no simple answers to what style is best. Some are more practical than others, but mechanically they almost all have more in common with each other than they have different. There are only so many ways that a human body can move, and thus there is necessarily a lot of overlap in martial ...


3

There are two schools of thought based on two distinct principles as to how to generate a punch with maximum effectiveness. In schools similar to karate the force comes from pushing after you connect with the target. Someone punching in this manner will train to strengthen their muscles in order to apply more force. These punches have reletively short ...


2

Regarding punch power Some basic physics together with some thoughts on punches and kicks may help: [impulse] = [mass] × [velocity] It is much better to improve speed by technique (!) and exercises (which may include weight training, but as I take it in another sense than you think of it) than weight, if you want to hit harder: Becoming heavier ...


2

The stance typically referred to as "goat-clamping stance" in Wing Chun is Yee Jee Kim Yeung Ma, typically translated as "two character abduction horse stance". The "two character" refers to its resemblence to the character for two in Chinese. "Abduction" refers to the drawing in of the knees which apocryphally is similar to clamping a goat between your ...


2

You might want to take a look at what I wrote about the subject in my answer here: Defence against Wing Chun In the link above, I explained what the original purpose was for Wing Chun, why it was invented, and what its weaknesses are. I think you can apply that article as a partial answer to your question. You also mentioned self-defense vs. MMA fighting. ...


2

It's so weird to hear you say these things. Wing chun is a SOFT art and is not about brute strength or force. Believe it or not, it was actually created by a woman and was meant as a way for softness to overcome hardness. What you are experiencing is the exact opposite of what the art is about! I studied kempo for 12 years and definitely have been there ...


1

To add to these really well researched answers a personal experience: I learned wing tsung at a fairly practical school and after some years training and sparring (we trained with shoes on hard floor and often had mostly unlimited fights) I found that the biggest thing I got out of it are reflexes. You can train the Wing Tsung forms in training situations,...


1

I'm new to this section of Stack Overflow, but I practice and teach wing chun and self defence. I've read some comments here and I agree that this is a "gorilla vs shark" like question. I'm not for heavy theorizing martial arts, but I do miss some considerations which could be of interest to the readers. Mainly, you should not explicitly train to overcome ...


1

It is physically correct with greater weight and muscle power you will definitely be having a greater impact while punching. The greater weight will have a greater momentum as soon as the muscles give you the speed the impact will be doubled. momentum = mass X velocity Muscle Power is more important than weight, as heavier bodies are much more difficult to ...


1

Being attacked on the street (depending on where you live) is theoretically a once in a life time event, so there's no point going somewhere frequently where you are considerably increasing the likeliness of being hurt because then you might as well take your chances on the street without paying out money and time and risking pain/blood/injury for Wing Chun ...



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