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I've been practicing Wing Chun (Wang Kiu lineage) for over a year now...having just been introduced a little to sparring with kicks allowed, I tend to try to automatically block kicks with my arms. Emphasis mine. This is your problem. Flinchy reactions to normal attacks is caused by either A) not knowing what to do or B) not sparring enough under ...


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This answer makes the assumption that you're talking about reaching down to block low kicks with your arms, which your question seems to indicate. In Wing Chun, the rule of thumb is that the hands address anything above the waist, and kicks anything below the waist, with some overlap in the groin region. If the kick is coming at your head you should be ...


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Things that recommend Wing Chun to a sailor: It is sometimes commented that Wing Chun is best suited for fighting in a telephone booth. This is not so far from the truth. Wing Chun specializes in close-quarters tactics at bent-arm range/trapping range (though I assure you it does possess long-range techniques and tactics). This would be well-suited to ...


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It is normal for Wing Chun sifus to hand off instruction to senior students. For example, despite popular conception, very little of Bruce Lee's Wing Chun training was given by Yip Man. I guess a better question is: do the senior students actually training you give you a lot of good, one-on-one, hands-on training in the "Old" school? Understand that the ...


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The style matters less than who is teaching it. The same style can be taught very differently by different people. I would look for location first: your dojo/gym/training place should be within easy travel distance of where you are. I would say less than an hour's drive (both ways) but that might vary depending on how much you generally travel. Secondly, ...


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Fear is the point here. On the same line of pain and fear which you've already experienced, if you go on you will need to cope with rage, adrenaline dumps, loss of confidence or willingness to surrender, bleeding, inability ot breathe normally, extreme fatigue and not being able to fight back properly. Even losing consciousness or having some bone broken are ...


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May I also recommend doing Taichi along with whatever other martial art you decide to learn. You may have to search for a teacher who knows the martial arts side of Taichi, but generally when you do they are overjoyed to find a student interested in that aspect. Learning Taichi along with your martial art will work to fix up posture mis-alignments, free up ...


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For what it's worth I was in pretty much the same place as you - in my 40s and in need of some kind of activity to stay fit while being nice to my knees. Boxing did the trick for me. It is relatively easy to learn in the sense that it is conecptually simple (you are only having to deal with striking) but is incredibly challenging to master... especially the ...


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I went with a standard free standing frame. I am on a 3rd floor apartment of an old colonial. The guy below me freaked out. I did a little research and started with a piece of 1/2 4 x 8 Homasote 440 soundboard. I cut it into 3 pieces. 2 of them are 66 in by about 24 inch the covered underneath the framework of the dummy and the front leg. I then went a piece ...


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From your background, BJJ could be the easiest choice: you've already practiced it, it does benefit from breakdancing (read the story of the Martinez brothers at 10th Planet Vista), you were good at it. It does require flexibility though, but you can always work on it. That said, I think the main point is not what is the easiest choice, but rather the most ...


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As you mentioned, by your estimation, both schools are good. So it's really a question of your comfort level (do you feel you will definitely learn better from the more expensive school?) and your own finances. The right instruction and the right type of instructor for you can have you learn things almost ten times faster than poor instruction or bad fits ...


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I once was a Muay Thai practitioner for seven years. My humble opinion is that fear should not be eliminated. Fear should be conditioned as you condition your shins, your elbows, your knuckles. I stepped against opponents more expert and more strong than me. I went against those fanatic kind of practitioners taking the full contact nature of my martial art ...


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The same way you overcome your fear of getting into a cold swimming pool: let it happen. Allow yourself to get kicked. It will get better and better until soon getting kicked or punched doesn't trigger your automatic panic reflex. Experience is the best teacher. There is no meditation, focusing technique or kamehameha wave that you need to study. Just ...


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We don't have a huge amount to go on here: Easier on the [stiff] joints: suggests you might want to avoid an art with a lot of vigorous joint locking, such as ju jitsu or hapkido; on the other hand something that does twist the joints but less aggressively might actually help you in feeling less stiff - e.g. aikido, taichi. spatial intelligence / ...



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