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7

I like the other answers here. Let me just add my take on this subject. I hope I don't offend anyone here. Talking about a style's weaknesses is often a hot button subject. Wing Chun was developed with a particular purpose in mind. And that was to train someone as quickly as possible to be able to fight people who were trained in traditional kung-fu arts ...


3

I agree with Dave Liepmann, that the only real way to learn a martial art is to have a teacher who can guide you. And you need to do it two or three times a week. But, let me offer a small amount of hope for you to learn wing-chun if you have no teacher present and no school around. If I was in your situation, and I knew that wing-chun was the only martial ...


3

Find and enroll in a wing chun school, then in a year test your skills in a full-contact competition. Tutorials are for learning how to set up your programming development environment. YouTube channels are for entertainment. Neither are training. Training is becoming an athlete by working out, learning skills, and entering competitions.


3

Wear protection Cant stress this enough Irrespective of what some schools may teach, it is detrimental to you and your well being to constantly increase your tenacity in hopes that your body would get "used to it" someday. Train smart. Master technique. If your body deteriorates, you have lost your primary weapon. Take care of your body at all costs.


3

Orthodox wing chun focuses on "trapping" range, between striking range and the clinch. Within many schools' live training (sparring) there is often virtually no throwing, no shots, very little clinch work or kicking, and punching or other hand strikes are often only trained once contact has been made, leaving long-range boxing untrained. The style has ...


2

Masutatsu Oyama (the founder of Kyukushin full-contact Karate and enemy of bulls everywhere) said later in his life that he regrets doing all that damage to his hands to "toughen them up". Granted, there is a bit of toughening that needs to be done, but it is mostly to increase the bone density of your hand, rather than the skin itself. This isn't something ...


1

There are four distances at which we fight: Long range. You'll need to perform a jumping attack to close the distance. punching range. I'll lump kicking in here for simplicity. close quarters. This is where Wing Chun is very effective. grappling. Basically anything that is NOT close quarters fighting would be logically effective, but I wouldn't face a ...


1

I rather think you should not focus on the power of your punches on the bag but rather on technique. You Sun-Punch should actually by quiet relaxed and on impact you should put your body behind this. Performed correctly you will have almost no friction and bleeding will no longer be an issue. I've had the same issue in the past, worked in it and improved. ...


1

Yeah, you should wear wraps and bag gloves when you hit the heavy bag. If your hands are bleeding, that doesn't mean you're a tough guy. It means you didn't wear proper equipment. If your wrist gets injured, that doesn't mean you're training hard, it means you traded one hard training session for weeks of not training. You should get wraps and bag gloves ...


1

There are several aspects you should work on. Core strength is vital for front kick (mae geri in Karate). This is because you need to balance throughout the move from start to finish. Do some plank exercises and press-ups with good form (flat back). Pilates too, belive it or not, for deep-lying core muscles. Chamber the knee as high as you can - this gives ...


1

Dave has given a very good answer in general for fighting arts/ways. With Wing Chun we also do rolling hands and "static" fight drills where you can not really keep your distance. For these I believe that shorter arms are advantages. Remember when you are crossing hands or doing poon sau first make sure that range is correct so you can touch your opponent ...


1

Some techniques and training do not stress the joints, others do. It depends on the martial art, the teacher and the kind of training. For example, a lot of judoka end up with bad knees. Likewise a lot of capoeira folks end up with back injuries. Joint damage can be understood in 3 factors: Too much stress, bad applied If you try to do too much force ...


1

The following answer is based on my personal experience and information I have gained in 10 year of martial arts practice. I hope it will be of use. As many other sports, martial arts also fall into the category of 'impact sports'. Indeed the joints are stressed not as much by practices such as shadow boxing but by striking hard surfaces as for instance ...


1

Isolating the triceps will not be very effective. The most effective way to train is through functional exercises, in which more than one muscle must work together against resistance in a way that is similar to how the technique will actually be used. Let me list a few exercises we use (some mentioned already). To increase power: Resistance bands: we hold ...


1

Muscle strength improves by resistance to an intended movement. For punches, there's a few tricks that work well. Light Weights When I say light, I mean ounces. You might want to take a fishing weight or stones to use. Lay on your back, do your chain punches with the weights in your hands. Laying on your back means gravity is pulling the weight in the ...



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