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9

I want to be able to be prepared against any kind of opponent. You are looking for a unicorn there. No martial art whatsoever is able to do that. There is no ultimate fighting art. That said, most martial arts (McDojo excluded) can give you an edge in self defence. It will shift the odds in your favour which is a good thing. However, self defence is ...


6

I studied judo and many other martial arts. I've never studied wrestling. Personally, I feel like it's perhaps less helpful to a new student to try to explain things in terms they understand already. It's usually best to approach it like they have absolutely no knowledge and start from there, just like you do with every student. Otherwise you assume they ...


6

You're going to get a lot of push-back and they'll probably close this question, but you're not far off. Hard-sparring arts have proven themselves in ways that non-competitive arts have not. However, don't forget that other arts spar hard as well: san da/san shou is akin to kickboxing with fast throws and takedowns. However, like how all modern mixed artial ...


4

Go to each school in your area and take a few lessons in each to find the one that you will stick with and agrees with you mentally and physically. Once you start back on that road you will mature and your goals will change.


4

Fake professional wrestling grew out of one of the oldest martial arts tradition: the challenge match. Chinese martial artists sometimes fought on the lei tai to establish dominance over teach martial arts in an area: ...and it was common in feudal Japan for students of one school to invade another school and demand a match. Fighting is at the heart of ...


4

"I'm trying to diet and exercise properly to reach my low body fat goal. (..)" That said, boxing is the way to go. The workout is quite intense, because you need to build stamina in order to box properly. "Also, I want to learn some basic self defense" For self defense, i would include Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu as well, since it has proven its ...


2

There is no magic against "any kind of opponent," because your opponents are so potentially varied. Some are armed; others not. Some are individuals; others are groups or gangs. Some are simply angry; others are (pardon the now-obsolete psychological phrasing) psychopaths. Some are your drunk uncle Eddie, who you don't want to hurt, but you can't have him ...


1

Anything you take to better yourself will help with self defense. I train BJJ, Muay Thai, and a little wrestling and in my opinion one of the best martial arts for self defense is Krav Maga. My reason behind this is with BJJ, Boxing, and Wrestling - these are also considered sports. When you train, the focus is not to end the fight as quickly as possible ...


1

Here's what I would start with, with some judo knowledge and close to no wrestling experience: Standard kumikata (lapel and sleeve) roughly maps to over-unders or collar-and-elbow. This should help jump-start the porting of judo techniques to wrestling without a gi. Hip throws are quite similar. There are rules differences that I'm not qualified to speak ...


1

Depends on the application. BJJ is useless against more than one opponent, for instance. MMA is probably best because it distills all the best parts from various styles into a collection of useful techniques for most situations.



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