912 reputation
17
bio website thomasowl.com
location USA
age 30
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen Jun 9 at 6:23

MMA instructor / Fighter

BJJ instructor

Kickboxing instructor

I like Armbars


Jun
9
comment Effectiveness of low kick to inner thigh of opponent's leading leg in mauy thai boxing?
inside leg kicks are great counters against any sort of big strike or charge. Excellent answer
Mar
12
comment Sparring against Offensive Fighters
@Vass Basically, when someone shoots in for a double or single, you throw an uppercut and then the hook you follow with is kind of like a push, helping you turn the angle.
Mar
3
comment Best martial art for someone with bad elbow?
Good armbars are on the elbow, and work on extending it, so that might be a problem if you get caught in them. A good school would have proper partners for you however. I guess I don't know enough about (your) arthritis to give further advice. I don't think the snappy punches from traditional TKD or Karate are very good for the elbow either, since they lock out your arm, unlike a boxing or thai boxing punch.
Mar
3
comment Training while exhausted
I agree with this post 100%. Some instructors do not realize the difference between a warmup and a conditioning. But students are guilty too, thinking themselves too good for the warmup, which I do think is critical to have.
Feb
26
comment Drills for reducing your natural “flinch” reaction
I was just going to say : get punched more, but yours is a very eloquent answer!
Feb
17
comment What drills are good to escape/break Spider Guard?
The leg drag works better vs de la riva than vs spiderguard; in spiderguard your opponent can easily switch to either side; in de la riva he's set himself up for a specific angle that you have to counter and exploit. The leg drag you described is amazing for passing de la riva though. It's just very hard to get in spider guard from my experience.
Feb
17
comment Rising Block or High Block stylistic question
(I don't disagree that it's not really a block, because yeah, that straight up never works. But hey, it's TKD/TSD so, yeah not expecting much reality there in the first place)
Feb
17
comment Rising Block or High Block stylistic question
How do you know your interpretation is the right interpretation of the rising block as oposed to his master/any other TKD master that has ever shown it? Then first you describe basically a duck under from wrestling (slapping the arms up and going to the body). And then you describe a magical bone break. Unless you keep the shoulder in position it's very unlikely that it will break the arm. Maybe extend it a bit, but not really hyperextend. HAve you ever broken someone's arm this way?
Feb
14
comment What information should I consider when choosing a martial art to study?
DaveLiepmann was correct with his first post about my intentions. This guy was training to get in shape and to have fun and be able to stick with the sport. So, self defense is secondary. Besides, any grappling school worth their salt will do some self defense vs strikes; e.g. how to close to the distance safely against a puncher and to bring him(her) to the ground.
Feb
10
comment How do you prepare for the stress of a real self-defense situation?
I think you need to mention 'fight in an MMA bout (After sufficient training)' to engage in and experience an adrenaline dump in the safest simulation of a fight situation. Great post!
Feb
4
comment How much risk is there to have a nose broken when sparring in muay thai?
I have no idea how to answer that. Hit people hard enough that they feel it, but not hard enough to hurt them? It also depends on the person you're sparring, and I hit harder to the body than to the head - I don't want to cause anyone brain trauma, they need their brain to learn.
Jan
23
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
Basically, your strategies might work but you forgot the most important part of advice: TRAIN!
Jan
23
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
I'm downvoting this because anecdotal experience of getting your ass kicked (once) in college isn't the same as an answer, especially when you make a thousand assumptions that are false. The advice to go to the ground is not bad, but you can't just say hook the leg/ do a takedown; takedowns are hard, especially if someone is charging into you and you have no experience in grappling. Clearly you've put some thought into this, and not all is bunk; but theory needs to be tested and applied before you can give it as advice, and there's none of that here because you'd have answered differently.
Jan
22
comment What does a free fighting teacher teach
Whichever name the instructor uses to call it? There is no 'official' single style called 'free fighting' that has an umbrella organization or something like that like for example Karate or Brazillian Jiu Jitsu or Boxing. It's kind of a generic catch-all name that basically stands for Mixed Martial Arts (e.g. techniques from all kinds of fighting arts).
Jan
22
comment What does a free fighting teacher teach
Free Fighting? I think it is called MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) mostly around the world. Every MMA teacher will teach things differently; some will focus on clinching, others on boxing, others on ground fighting, it will depend where their skills lay.
Jan
22
comment Is it true that most fights end on the ground? What is the evidence?
From my experience as a bouncer, most times when someone is hit, they immediately either flee or try to clinch. From there, they stumble and fall.
Jan
22
comment What are the purposes of martial arts forms?
THANK You for finally providing a sane answer to this question. Everyone else is nut-riding Karate and TKD, but from what I've read, none of them has actually ever been punched in the face in reality. I am glad not everyone is deluded. It also saves me from typing that all up +1
Jan
22
comment What are good solutions for MMA training with half long hair?
Usually when I go for a brabo or baseball bat choke on someone with longer hair I have a lot of their neckhair in my hands. I'm gentle, but I still come out of the match with some hair in my hands sometimes. Not because of viciousness, but because when you grab the gi, there's just hair there, even when you regrip. (please train with a Gi, it'll help you understand different things than just no-gi, they key to unlocking awesome jiujitsu is doing both, especially if you dislike either. )
Nov
18
comment Martial arts for building self confidence
Well, considering your other concerns, I feel grappling would be a better start than a realistic striking style - where if you get sparred early and too hard will be much more discouraging (due to actual pain that you're not used to (yet)) than losing in BJJ or Judo would.
Nov
16
comment Can there be too much training?
I train twice a day every day, am freaking pooped twice a day. I take sundays and wednesday nights off. Sometimes I take a few days break, but that's more to refresh my brain. Your body will get used to it, and his 19 year old kid's body has probably grown up with it for the past few years (assuming he's been training for a few, if he's instructing). His body is probably expecting and looking forward to the exercise.