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Jun
24
answered Aikido forward roll with backpack
Jun
14
comment Good sources on using sticks for grappling/locks?
Nope, they've been seriously into BJJ and combining it with stick and knife fighting for a long time now. They start out on their feet with sticks, but it often ends up on the ground. They do chokes and other things with the sticks. They also have practice knives that they use with their grappling.
Jun
13
answered Good sources on using sticks for grappling/locks?
Jun
13
comment Good sources on using sticks for grappling/locks?
I've read that book. It's a very traditional Japanese flavor of stick fighting. And it's kind of a misnomer. It's less "stick" and more "hanbo" (3-4 foot staff). A "stick" tends to be more like 1-2 feet long. The Japanese flavor represented in the book is very different from the Filipino flavor (of escrima / kali, which is what I tend to think of when someone says "stick fighting"). Both flavors offer something, and they don't overlap much. So the book is worth getting.
Jun
1
comment Preferring BJJ concepts over Technique?
What a great article! Thanks for posting it. I'm sure this will get a lot of discussion here. It's hard knowing what Kit Dale really means, though, from the article. And it sounds like his approach made sense to him but might not be something that can be taught to others very easily. One of the more interesting things he mentioned was the topic of improving teaching methods to get better / faster results than using traditional methods. Maybe the advantages and disadvantages of this form of learning/teaching should be left for another question.
May
29
comment Arm Toughening Without Losing Sensitivity
That was a good point about there being different types of nerves. I didn't make that distinction in my answer. +1
May
28
revised Arm Toughening Without Losing Sensitivity
added 7 characters in body
May
28
answered Arm Toughening Without Losing Sensitivity
May
23
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
My vote would be for BJJ to start with (Gracie Jiujitsu, not sport BJJ). But wrestling is not bad, either.
May
22
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
I've been to about a half dozen Aikido dojo. They were all traditional, usually Aikikai. And I trained a little in it. In every case, I was told to "go with" and "never resist" anything done to me. It is a great insult to them if you resist what they do. They make that clear to every new white belt who steps into their dojos. If they resist even a little, they will be floored. It happened to me on several occasions, even though I wasn't resisting on purpose or with much force. They get angry, yell at you, hit you, crank your joints, and throw you on your face. By black belt, nobody resists.
May
22
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
Yes it does. There are some forms of Aikido (like Tomiki) that do actually employ fully resisting opponents in a competition. Notice also when you pull up youtube videos on it, it bares little resemblance to traditional Aikido. Instead, it looks more like Judo, but with different techniques and rules. And that's great! They figure out real quick what works and what doesn't, and what they have to do to adapt the concepts of Aikido into live techniques that they can actually use for real. Most Aikido groups don't do that.
May
22
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
No, you misunderstood. My list is not an "or", it's an "and". These are business practices that combine to maximize income for their schools. Yes, legitimate schools have long term contracts, unfortunately. It's designed to increase their income and to take advantage of the fact that most students will stop going long before their contract period ends. Ka-ching! That's the sound of money. Many good schools do it. Many good schools don't. All bad schools do it, however.
May
22
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
I went ahead and added a couple paragraphs in the answer to clarify the difference between "force" and "resistance".
May
22
revised is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
Added bit about force vs. resistance.
May
21
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
No problem. Fully resisting opponents is half of my answer. The other half is to choose martial arts that give you skill in all 3 ranges of unarmed combat: free-fighting, clinch, and ground. You can combine martial arts to give you the whole thing. But Gracie Jiujitsu or MMA (either of those two) probably gives you the biggest bang for the buck at this point in time. Just note that both do have sport adaptations, and that you have to watch out for techniques that only work in sport and not self-defense.
May
21
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
Full resistance, not necessarily force. The two are different. And yes, those arts do involve fully resisting opponents. But I'm not saying your training must involve getting beat up every day. In fact, the opposite is needed. You need a safe way to practice with full resistance so that you can keep coming back day after day and make progress, hopefully while having a lot of fun as well! You increase force as you are capable of doing so safely. That comes gradually.
May
21
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
I'll second the idea that you should do something like wrestling or Brazilian Jiujitsu before or at the same time as taking TKD, if TKD is something you want to do for self-defense. I've seen some good examples of TKD used in MMA competition. But those people had to also train in wrestling and BJJ, as well as one or more of: boxing, Muay Thai, or kick-boxing. It's not that TKD can't be useful. It can. But you definitely need to train in these other things to make it so. Especially BJJ, wrestling, and/or MMA. So you're not wrong, Juann Strauss.
May
19
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
The business model that typifies a McDojo is one where students sign long-term contracts, there are lots of different belt colors, each belt color requires paying large fees for a testing, and everyone basically passes their tests. In a McDojo you're promised a black belt if you just pay the tuition, pay the testing fees, and have a real minimum (very low bar) of skill. They're in it for the money only. These places graduate black belts after just 2 years, sometimes less. And you even see 5 year old black belts. Their quality is poor. And often times, the instructor is a fraud.
May
18
revised is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
added 2096 characters in body
May
18
answered is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?