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1h
comment Check my form - 8 point block
My comment is: Keep practicing and get correction from your instructors. Right now, you have not committed any of it to memory (as evidence by you hesitating to remember the next move). You lack lower body coordination with the upper body, and therefore you have poor balance and poor power. Your blocking surfaces often appear to be the padded sides of your forearm, and some would say that's fine, others will say use the bone instead (think of them like counter-strikes, not just blocks). Lastly, there's no snap in your fists. Basically, you're a novice. Good start. Now keep practicing it.
Aug
13
comment Training two martial arts at the same time, on the same days of the week?
Eagle Claw kung-fu makes use of "2-person sets" which are predetermined (choreographed) fight routines. And they can go on for a long period of time. The chin-na (joint locking) 2-person sets of Eagle Claw are famous and very cool. Karate often has just drills that they call "single step sparring". They're also predetermined routines, but typically only involve one to three different movements. Yup, like it or not many martial arts use the word "sparring" to refer to these choreographed fight sequences.
Aug
12
revised Training two martial arts at the same time, on the same days of the week?
added 387 characters in body
Aug
12
answered Training two martial arts at the same time, on the same days of the week?
Aug
12
comment Source for Bruce Lee “Adapt What Is Useful” Quote
Haha. That was simple! Here I was trying to scour ancient philosophy texts for something similar sounding to find the true origin. I'm pretty sure Bruce Lee wasn't the first to come up with this idea, and I remember reading something similar elsewhere, but I forget where.
Aug
10
comment Do Martial artists live longer
It depends on what kind of strain you're talking about, Juann Strauss. Taking hits to your head can cause cumulative damage to your brain, which might lead to increased risk of depression and suicide. Taekwondo practitioners often have a habit of hyper-extending the knee, which may cause arthritis or tendonitis of the knees or later on in life. Dynamic tension (karate, chi-kung, etc.) could increase blood pressure which might lead to dementia, loss of eyesight, etc. All kinds of possible ways in which contemporary martial arts practice could lead to health problems. Can't easily be dismissed.
Aug
10
comment Need help with sanchin kata
Just wanted to chime in: Some karate styles such as Matsumura Seito Shorin Ryu practice their own Sanchin kata without dynamic tension. The goal is not to build muscle. They practice it with relaxed, gentle movement and use a different kind of breathing and kiko with it. It's a soft version, compared with most other sanchin kata practiced by most other styles. It uses open hands instead of closed fists also.
Aug
6
comment Do Martial artists live longer
I don't recall ever seeing a study of any particular martial art's effects on life expectancy (positive or negative). This is really hard to study. Most people who take martial arts do it for a short period of time in their lives before moving on. For this kind of study, you might want people who train for longer periods of time, but for how long? And it might be self-selecting: People who train in martial arts the longest might be the types of people who would live longer anyway. Tricky.
Aug
4
comment Close quarter's defense: when you stand face to face with an attacker
What I find most risky in this situation for the defender is to back down and not want to fight. Generally when they show weakness and an unwillingness to fight, they get attacked. The pre-emptive strike can go horribly wrong also. Just like you said, it's possible the attacker is suckering you into punching him first. But fight videos generally don't back up that theory. Bottom line is to be ready to flip that switch on and fight when you need to.
Aug
4
comment Wrestling strategies
Everything is strategy. Most wrestlers try to feel for their opponent's weaknesses, trying to capitalize on them, while simultaneously playing to their own strengths. So if you're really good in one position, you're looking to get your opponent into that position somehow. I'm sure there are books on wrestling strategy which goes over what to look for in your opponent, how to attack, how to defend, etc. Unfortunately, it's not my sport, so I can't recommend any books.
Jul
31
comment Filipino martial arts question and teacher respect
@Sardathrion: Well, we tend to put our martial arts teachers on pedestals. It distances them and makes them less approachable. But it's a two-way street. Teachers should make a point to reach out to their students and be more personable and approachable. And not just to the students they like, to everyone. That way there aren't just these cliques where some students are favored by the teacher, and the rest are outsiders. I've seen that happen many times before. This is all human behavior. It only changes if the teacher takes proactive steps to change it.
Jul
30
answered Filipino martial arts question and teacher respect
Jul
27
comment Do you take supplements like protein when you train in Martial Arts?
You wouldn't happen to have a study or preferably a meta-study to back up the claim of 3:1 carb to protein ratio improving recovery? I don't even see how protein would improve recovery from a theoretical perspective. If anything, it should hinder it (because it might slow down the absorption rate of the carbohydrate).
Jul
27
answered Do you take supplements like protein when you train in Martial Arts?
Jul
22
awarded  Talkative
Jul
21
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Jul
21
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
Internal mechanics is just a phrase that means, "This is what you're doing inside your body, mechanically." You're doing stuff with bones, joints, tendons, and muscles. Internal mechanics are hard (or sometimes impossible) to see from the outside and hard to learn from text or even video instruction, so you usually need someone to give you an interactive, hands-on demonstration in person. Mike Sigman is someone who has done a lot to educate the Western world on the subject of internal mechanics, but he didn't make it up. If you ever have a chance to train with him, do it!
Jul
21
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
One other thing. The reason why Taiji forms are done so slowly is because it's really hard for beginners to maintain proper internal mechanics during the movements of the form. It's not because of meditation or because you're bringing your "chi" to your palms or whatnot - although you certainly can do that if you want. It's the amount of mental concentration, where you're constantly adjusting yourself to ensure that the jing you're doing is being done correctly. It's hard! You can NOT do it fast. And that's why it's done slowly. Nothing mystical going on. It's all internal mechanics.
Jul
21
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
@sirdank: Internal mechanics are at the core of all internal martial arts (Taiji, Xing-yi, Bagua, etc.). They are the foundation. The "jing" are all qualities of motion based on internal mechanics. The chan-su jing (silk reeling) practice of Chen style trains the internal mechanics of P'eng, Lu, Ji, and An jing. The forms add more jing (over 20!). At the root of all jing is p'eng jing. You start with p'eng jing if you want to understand internal mechanics. From there, you add silk reeling. And then add forms. Glad to hear you're investigating Chen style. Hopefully they can teach you.
Jul
20
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
@sridank: At this point we're just repeating ourselves. I believe you've been taught a kind of "health" Taiji that doesn't train internal mechanics. Chi is the central focus of what your Taiji instructor teaches, apparently, and it's probably because he/she doesn't know internal mechanics and therefore can't teach it. Without internal mechanics, it is not Taiji. It only looks like Taiji from the outside. That's not me saying that. That is from the current grandmasters of the Chen style. They and their students can demonstrate internal mechanics. Find a Chen style school near you to confirm.