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Jun
11
revised Karate Kata for those recently given birth
added 34 characters in body
Jun
11
revised Allow child to progress up the belts?
added 3 characters in body
Jun
11
revised Karate Kata for those recently given birth
deleted 104 characters in body
Jun
11
revised Karate Kata for those recently given birth
deleted 104 characters in body
Jun
11
revised Karate Kata for those recently given birth
deleted 3 characters in body
Jun
11
answered Karate Kata for those recently given birth
Jun
11
comment Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
We don't disagree on the technicals, just the way you might dismiss the back kick outright in favor of the side kick. Both have their advantages and disadvantages, and you'll get no argument from me that the back kick is inherently less useful during sparring than the side kick is. But, for a small number of real life scenarios (self-defense), the back kick is quite well suited. That's all I'm saying. Hybrid opening of the hip, though, is mechanically superior and used by most martial arts that do back kicks. The question is how much and when, not usually "if" they open it up.
Jun
10
answered Allow child to progress up the belts?
Jun
10
comment What are the main uses of aikido in self-defense?
Thanks. Yes, the 6 feet away ki projection thing is pretty rare in aikido. But the other more subtle things that I mentioned aren't at all rare. Yes, you do need real sparring to show you how you can possibly apply what you've learned. The way you train matters, not what style you train. Find an MMA or Gracie JJ school, enroll, and stay there for 6 months to a year. Take what you learned from that into your Aikido training. Your Aikido school won't like you doing it in class, of course, but you can roll (spar) after class or in private. It is very eye opening. Highly recommended.
Jun
7
comment Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
Agree about wrenching the spine and limitations on movement. But this is mostly alleviated by doing a hybrid of both (as I described in my response), which most martial arts actually do. It might be demonstrated with knee and toes pointing down, but people end up twisting outwards a bit at the end and opening up the hip a bit at the end. This allows more flexibility in the back and hip, more power, stability, and almost feels like a side kick at the end. It doesn't wrench the back. And there advantages over the side kick (not as telegraphed, quicker setup for opponents behind you, etc.).
Jun
5
comment Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
Yeah, that video shows a tendency to open the hip sooner than arts like Shotokan would do it. Both Shotokan and that branch of TKD practice it like a back kick to begin with and finishing like a back kick and side kick hybrid. It's for mechanical reasons, to keep balance, and to see your opponent. "Pure" back kicks are more rare in martial arts for those reasons. But TKD practitioners generally show a tendency to open up their hips earlier, due to the habit of using the side kick (one of their favorite kicks) and the muscle memory from side kicks.
Jun
4
revised Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
deleted 16 characters in body
Jun
4
answered Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
Jun
4
comment Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
I discussed the spinning kicks here in depth. Does this answer your question: martialarts.stackexchange.com/questions/2935/…
Jun
3
comment What is the best way to avoid armlocks?
Can't tell if that was a joke or not, Juann Strauss. First, you can't actually bite fingers off. Second, against someone who knows how to put you in these things, you won't get a chance to bite at their hands or arms. Assuming you could even get to a position to bite, he'd see that and take advantage of the fact that you're now way off balance. Against untrained people, sure try anything if that's all you have. But it's better to prepare for these things by assuming you're fighting someone who knows what they're doing. My opinion. Biting isn't usually the best option.
May
29
comment What is the best way to avoid armlocks?
I kind of wanted you to hold off on voting for the best answer until there was more than just my answer. It's good to see what other people come up with. But thanks for your vote. :)
May
29
answered What is the best way to avoid armlocks?
May
23
awarded  Enlightened
May
23
awarded  Nice Answer
May
18
comment How to deal with an “anti-violence” instinct during sparring?
You're right, but you're arguing something Val wasn't arguing. Val's point was that sparring felt like a different situation than a real-life defense situation. That, in real-life, Val would internalize it differently. Val would use force against a real threat, but doesn't feel like the anxiety about causing harm would get in the way like it does in class. In class, Val's life is not really being threatened. That's the distinction. Probably in real life, this anxiety of Val's would still occur. It's just that in real life, Val can justify using force and be okay about it.