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Oct
20
revised Style vs instructor
deleted 4 characters in body
Oct
15
comment Martial Arts wannabe accosting and threating neighbor who simply complains over parking issue
I interpreted it as a general question about what to do in this scenario and how to keep a crazy neighbor away from you. It does sound like Frank is eager to start a fight with him and is looking for legal grounds to allow him to fight the crazy neighbor in "self-defense" (in other words, to get away with hurting him, legally). I have advised filing a police report and/or getting a restraining order instead. Egging on and getting into a fight with a crazy person, a known felon, who also knows where you live, isn't a smart idea.
Oct
14
answered Martial Arts wannabe accosting and threating neighbor who simply complains over parking issue
Oct
12
comment Best Martial Arts For Home Training
@YoustayIgo Note that my links above were examples for 3 different martial arts. I'm not saying you should do one of those martial arts. The links provide a general approach for how to learn a martial art when you have no schools nearby. As for which martial art to train or what techniques you should work on, pretty much anything goes so long as you follow my general guidelines. If you're working in solo and don't expect to find any partners, then you should focus on martial arts that provide a lot of solo training (kung-fu, karate, taichi, etc.).
Oct
12
comment Best Martial Arts For Home Training
Yes see also my answers here: martialarts.stackexchange.com/questions/4315/… and martialarts.stackexchange.com/questions/2857/… and martialarts.stackexchange.com/questions/4528/…
Oct
1
comment Any ITF Taekwon-Do Sine wave studies?
Board breaking isn't a proper, objective measurement of power, though. So we'd need impact force measurements from some standard measurement device. (There are many out there, so you just need to select one and prepare a study.)... And that was a big caveat I mentioned. When you teach people how to punch both ways, you have to ask them to actually get good at both and really try to hit as hard as they can. You can gather many people together and look at averages. You can also look at people who just learned one and not the other. From these you might be able to glean something useful. Tricky.
Oct
1
comment Any ITF Taekwon-Do Sine wave studies?
@TonyD Yes, that's the non-politically correct version. Hehe. Thing is, I do see the possibility for the sine wave motion to work out for them, but they need some understanding of internal mechanics for that to happen. And you get that from studying Tai Chi and other internal arts. What I'm referring to is the "bounce jing" and "p'eng jing". The problem is that when they use the sine wave motion, they lose the connection with the ground and sort of "float" up high until they come down. Maybe that's better for TKD, since it involves so much kicking. But defensively it's not so good I think.
Oct
1
comment Any ITF Taekwon-Do Sine wave studies?
Well I think what would make sense would be for someone to study punch power with and without sinusoidal motion. Because otherwise just looking at force vectors from a Physics standpoint isn't really going to get anyone anywhere (as I mentioned before, humans are not accurately portrayed by point force models). But the challenge of this sort of experiment is making sure the people being studied are really trying to give it their all in each case. And with TKD, maybe they don't really know how to punch well without the sine wave motion. Experimental methodology may be inadequate.
Sep
30
comment Any ITF Taekwon-Do Sine wave studies?
I should point out that critics of this theory show from Physics that the downward force can not contribute to the forward force. I would say that's too simplistic, since this is a human being, not a point force model. In a human being, the dropping motion can be translated into a wave through the body, as it travels to the legs. Then it bounces off of the ground and pushes upwards through the legs, where the force is then channeled out the arms. I don't know if this increases the actual force of the strike in a significant way than the non-sinusoidal way of striking does, however.
Sep
26
comment When training spinning kicks, is it more important to prioritize control or height?
Yeah, I wasn't too sure what your particular situation was, but I had to mention that part about priorities, because it comes up so often in martial arts and in life in general. Anyway, make some time during each day to train your flexibility, and it will come back. It doesn't have to be a big deal, just 10 minutes here and there would be good. And that leaves the muscles, which you can get back a number of ways. Keep at it.
Sep
26
revised When training spinning kicks, is it more important to prioritize control or height?
deleted 1 character in body
Sep
25
answered When training spinning kicks, is it more important to prioritize control or height?
Sep
16
comment Is There Any Martial Art Where They Use Legs For Grappling?
Yeah, Kani basami is one of several scissors kicks that are in Harimau, by the way. Harimau has a bunch of sneaky leg things that they do. They also have those flying arm-bars and things. Not sure about a flying triangle choke, but they do have the triangle choke, the reverse triangle, and other triangle-like chokes using the legs. It does a lot with the legs. Mind you, is all of it practical? Well, maybe, maybe not. Take some of it and try it out in MMA and see.
Sep
16
comment Exercises for strengthening arms, wrists and fingers with the intent of sword use
@USFBS Good point! Yes, inertia acts to oppose the force in the opposite direction. So there is that. But then there's still this downward force caused by gravity which can cause you to train the sword sub-optimally, and I believe may cause problems with form if you just keep loading up the weight on the pole-arm like I mentioned. The pulley system is a big improvement over that kind of resistance training. And weight lifting exercises that work your core muscles (dead lift, squat, plank, etc.) and the forearms (pull-ups, dips, etc.) are going to stabilize everything to make your form better.
Sep
16
revised Is There Any Martial Art Where They Use Legs For Grappling?
added 344 characters in body
Sep
15
answered Is There Any Martial Art Where They Use Legs For Grappling?
Sep
14
comment What is the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu gi/no-gi controversy?
Your answer doesn't nail it like Dave Liepmann's answer does. The controversy stems from within BJJ training. Some emphasize no-gi training because it's seen as more "realistic", since you probably won't be wearing your gi with you everywhere, and you can't expect your opponents in a street fight to be wearing gi. So the idea was to train without a gi, because that's how you'll use that art. But the Gracie family has always said that gi training is better and allows you to perform in no-gi better. The reason they give is that gi training hammers in the technical aspects of the art better. FYI.
Sep
2
comment Is there a reason why wing chun is uncommon in MMA
@CortAmmon No. What I'm saying is that without a "core" skill which has been developed using fully resisting, live opponents in a safe manner, whatever other special techniques you have like eye gouging, throat strikes, kicks to the groin, etc., you will be unable to use those techniques "reliably" in a real struggle. If your style really does depend on these special techniques (can't be used well without them), then it is impossible for that style to develop this core skill. It will be unreliable in a real struggle, because it has not been trained with fully resisting, live opponents.
Sep
2
comment Is there a reason why wing chun is uncommon in MMA
@Cort It doesn't sound like you're getting Dave's implication. The styles that actually depend on eye gouges and kicks to the groin are those that have no way of training their style safely with fully resisting, live opponents. Keyword being "safely". It's the safety of the training, while still allowing practitioners to go "all out", that allows one to build core fighting skill. Without that training, it really doesn't matter if your art has potent, deadly things like eye gouging, because you will lack the core skill to deliver it reliably in a full-on, real-life struggle.
Sep
1
comment Is there a reason why wing chun is uncommon in MMA
And I also wrote up a little blurb about Wing Chun here, which you might be interested in: martialarts.stackexchange.com/questions/2802/…