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Jan
14
comment Defence against Wing Chun
Yes and no. Yes, in that systems actually don't matter one bit. That's what I believe. What matters is how you train. If you train like MMA trains (anything goes, non-compliant partners), then you're going to be fine, because you'll figure out what you're missing and will go out and learn it on your own. Almost no WC group I've seen does it that way, though. They usually claim their system has everything they need and reject MMA style training. And what you're saying about the "reading" of an opponent is just one part of having a reliable training method. That alone won't give you much.
Jan
13
comment Defence against Wing Chun
True, and that is why it has holes. My advice: if you only have Wing Chun, be aggressive, make the first move, quickly get right up in your opponent's face, and fire as many punches as you can. That's probably WC's best tool (offensiveness and quickly moving to the close range). Many of the Youtube videos where Wing Chun people fail show a common trend: They waited for their opponent to come and bridge with them, just like a Wing Chun training drill or something. So they were sitting ducks for hook punches and Thai kicks. Limited tool set, so bend the situation to where you can use them.
Jan
12
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
Great, so show the chi moving from the sky to your head, then from your head to the ground. And publish that in a peer reviewed scientific journal and get back to me. It's not a metaphor, you say. So it must be real. If it is real, it shouldn't be hard to get your article published.
Jan
12
reviewed No Action Needed What does the closed fist covered by open hand signify?
Jan
10
reviewed Reviewed What is the application for tai chi's single whip?
Jan
10
comment What is the application for tai chi's single whip?
No, that little loopy thing you do with your hand as it curls into a crane's beak? That's a chin-na technique. It's to deal with a wrist grab. You are disengaging the grab and simultaneously grabbing his wrist and extending his arm out. This can be done from the inside or the outside position. On the inside position, the follow-up palm strike is to the face (stomach-5) or neck (stomach-9). On the outside position, the follow-up palm strike is actually a standing elbow lock/break and possible throw.
Jan
10
reviewed Reviewed What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
Jan
10
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
The trouble with this answer is it doesn't give any better understanding of what uprooting actually means and how it can be seen or felt. I think answers like this are often from misunderstandings or misinterpretations of ancient Chinese manuals, which themselves talk in cryptic ways, perhaps intentionally. In-person transmission is required for these kinds of topics, because clearly this sort of traditional mumbo-jumbo language fails us.
Jan
10
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Yes, it's a higher risk than using low kicks, that is 100% certain. The risk is partly because you can have your leg grabbed, but also because it can cause you to slip or lose your balance. Adding spins to it increases the risk, and it causes you to use more time, which means it takes more time to recover if things go wrong (like if your opponent rushes in to body check you). But, there are opportunities for everything. When you're done developing your basic techniques to a high degree, you can add a spin side kick to your game. Caveat is to always have a back-up plan when things go wrong.
Jan
10
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Lots of different scenarios. Too many to go over here. Someone grabs your right leg, then jump up and towards your opponent with a high left knee to his body or face (clinch first for stability). Some do a high round kick to the head to escape the leg grab also. Alternatively, kani basami (scissors kick). If no leg is grabbed, but he's rushing in to tackle or push you over, grab hold of him first, then turn your body to face him while putting your leg down, and sprawl. Practice it with a partner. Tell him to do these things at random, so you're not expecting anything in particular.
Jan
9
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
As for the down-side of all kinds of spinning kicks, if an opponent is able to anticipate that you're doing any spinning kick, he will rush in towards you, neutralizing your kick completely as well as putting you in a very vulnerable position. You will have one leg on the ground, making you temporarily immobile and susceptible to being grabbed, tackled, your leg caught, and/or your base leg swept. It's wise to have a back-up plan in case this happens. Or avoid spinning kicks completely.
Jan
6
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Yes, they're both used effectively, but in different situations. I will say that the spinning side kick is a very powerful kick. Some would say the most powerful kick. Adding a hop forward (and landing your back leg on the ground at the same time as you complete the kick) would make it even more powerful. It's deceptive, too, making it hard to anticipate. But the spinning crescent kick is also hard to anticipate, just not as powerful. Targets are different in both kicks. The side kick will be to the front of the torso. The crescent kick to the side of the head.
Jan
6
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Just to clarify: The JKD kick in question is called a "spin kick" in JKD, and in TKD it's called "spinning side kick" (also known as "reverse side kick"). The TKD kick the original question asks about, I think, is the "spinning inside-to-outside crescent kick", because it's circular (what I interpret "cyclic" to mean from the context of the question). Are those the two kicks you want compared?
Jan
6
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Yes, you're right. A spinning side kick is linear. What I was imagining was Bruce Lee's most famous "Dragon Whips Tail" kick, which is another name for the spinning inside-to-outside crescent kick. In JKD, as in all kung-fu/wushu, you keep the leg unbent and locked during that kick. You use the hip/waist to control the kick and don't snap the kick out at the end like TKD does. At least in Jun Fan / JKD.
Jan
4
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
It's hard to know how to interpret that, though. "Direct" in JKD can mean that the kick impacts on the front of your opponent's body (in a direct line from you to your opponent). But Bruce Lee also said that it can hit at a 90 degree angle (at the sides of your opponent), if that is the most direct path. In this case, I think using a spin kick to hit the front of your opponent's body is wrong. The only way you can make that work is by stepping to the side of your opponent first. So I think your interpretation of "direct" might be wrong. Can you list the page number in "Tao of JKD"?
Jan
4
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Not sure, but I think what MehdiHaghgoo might be referring to is the fact that Taekwondo will often keep the knee bent during the spin and then snaps it out (extends the leg) at the very last moment to complete the kick. This is a two cycle/phase motion. And to be technical, you first turn the upper body, then lift the leg while rotating the lower body, and then snap the kick out. JKD, I believe, just turns everything simultaneously and keeps the kicking leg fully extended throughout the kick (emphasizing waist and hip strength). I'm not certain this is what he/she is referring to.
Jan
4
answered Can i do judo or jiu-jitsu even if I have braces?
Dec
31
revised What is Qi? What is (fa) jin ? Where can I learn them?
added 33 characters in body
Dec
31
answered What is Qi? What is (fa) jin ? Where can I learn them?
Dec
28
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