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Feb
29
comment Are there any effective Kung Fu fighters in MMA?
@WayneEra They actually believe it. They point to eye gouges, vital point strikes, testicle ripping, etc. They say it's an integral part of their system, so competition is not possible. The counter argument is that if they need these techniques in order to compete, it must mean they believe their style to be weak. Also, even when more permissive rules have allowed these techniques, kung-fu practitioners haven't demonstrated they can actually use them in competition. The reason is that they never get a chance. They would need a "delivery system" to use them, which their styles don't teach.
Feb
28
answered Is the following position realistic in any fight?
Feb
26
comment Is Taking Away A Belt Appropriate Discipline?
I think it's probably a legal grey area. By the way, most karate and TKD schools award 1st degree black belt "recommended" at first (no stripes), and then 1st degree black belt "decided" (one stripe) after testing again. The "recommended" black belt is seen as probational. If you do not test for and achieve the "decided" rank within a certain amount of time after receiving the "recommended" rank, your black belt is supposed to be taken away, and you are automatically demoted to non-black-belt status. Whether they actually physically take the belt, it's up to them.
Feb
26
comment Southern Praying Mantis Kung Fu - Multiple attacker methodology
Ah. That's the one I'm most familiar with. Jook lum gee tong long pai. And it really is a front-on fighting system, with special internal mechanics, the use of the phoenix eye fist to attack vital points, chi-sao drills, throwing, and joint locking. Cool looking style. Very traditional. Difficult for outsiders to understand just looking at it what it's doing and why.
Feb
26
comment Is Taking Away A Belt Appropriate Discipline?
In some schools, it's customary to take a student's belt when the student receives the next rank. This is even after a "belt fee" where the student pays $20 for the belt itself. If you read the contract, the instructor has the right to take those belts away for any reason at any time. At least with those schools. It's not exactly theft, since the student agrees to the terms and conditions of the contract. What you're paying for, then, is not the belt but the ability to wear the belt. I doubt anyone would sue, though, over a $10-$20 belt. :)
Feb
26
comment Southern Praying Mantis Kung Fu - Multiple attacker methodology
By the way, on that subject, you should probably specify which SPM style you're talking about. There are 5 or 6 main branches of them. Each have a somewhat different look and approach.
Feb
26
comment Southern Praying Mantis Kung Fu - Multiple attacker methodology
Most SPM styles are actually pretty straight-on oriented, rather than dealing with attackers from the side-on. In fact, no martial art deals well with attackers coming at you from the side instead of straight-on. Most SPM styles focus on straight line motion as you travel on the floor. If there is something special about the way it deals with side-on attackers, I'm missing it. Better get a SPM expert on here. I only dabbled.
Feb
26
answered Is Taking Away A Belt Appropriate Discipline?
Feb
23
revised What are the advantages to adding a jump to a kick?
added 5 characters in body
Feb
23
revised What are the advantages to adding a jump to a kick?
added 130 characters in body
Feb
23
answered What are the advantages to adding a jump to a kick?
Feb
18
comment To prevent injuries, how do you discourage people from using excessive force?
I think most grapplers appreciate being shown escapes, reversals, etc. that seem effortless. For the "make it a game" aspect, this comes with experience. Once students learn more and more of them, they want to try them in randori. So, instructors should make it a part of their regular daily lessons, emphasizing calmness and using your head, not your brawn. When students are exposed to this kind of thinking enough, they'll do it all on their own. They'll get it. It just takes experience and training.
Feb
18
comment To prevent injuries, how do you discourage people from using excessive force?
Instructors can demonstrate what it feels like. Like take the kesa-gatame hold. Show how to power out of kesa-gatame. Then show a gentler way to escape. To emphasize it, have the smallest student do the hold on the largest student. Tell the larger of the two to power out of it. It was easy. Now reverse the positions so that the smaller student is being held, and tell him/her to do the same power move. If the smaller student can't do it, then it shows that the technique won't work reliably for the larger student either, if he encounters a larger opponent than himself.
Feb
18
revised To prevent injuries, how do you discourage people from using excessive force?
deleted 5 characters in body
Feb
18
revised To prevent injuries, how do you discourage people from using excessive force?
deleted 5 characters in body
Feb
18
answered To prevent injuries, how do you discourage people from using excessive force?
Feb
1
comment Aikido and Bulking Up?
Well then, you have two, maybe three possible choices, Drakes. You can continue with Aikido and allow your joints to worsen, and not be able to lift weights. You can stop doing Aikido completely, find something else to do, and lift weights. Or you can possibly find a way to continue doing Aikido without it screwing up your joints. I suspect the 3rd option is out, because you would have already figured that out, but maybe not. Listen, if your joints are messed up, stop doing whatever it is that's causing that. Joints are important, and you're going to regret it later on if you don't stop now.
Feb
1
comment Aikido and Bulking Up?
Gracie Jiujitsu is also a very strenuous, active martial art. You will use your muscle and cardio-vascular system. Do that often (Kron probably works out every single day multiple times a day), and you'll be in fine physical condition. Aikido isn't like that. There truly are an awful number of fat, absurdly out of shape black belt aikidoka. So that's out. But the idea of just going out, biking, swimming, maybe play tennis, do a bunch of pull-ups and push-ups, etc., that stuff is great. That's the way to do it. Weight training is very effective, too, though.
Feb
1
comment Aikido and Bulking Up?
Bulking is not something that interferes with aikido, nor vice-versa. So I think the question about bulking is a little strange to me. You need to be able to lift weights, first of all. You need to have your joints free of pain. And you need the time to lift weights. If you lack the time, or your joints are messed up, those are your issues you need to figure out first. Any aikidoka can bulk up. It just takes time and effort. Most don't, because most people don't put in the effort to get muscular, period, regardless of whether or not they're doing aikido.
Feb
1
comment Aikido and Bulking Up?
This is the correct answer. Drakes, if your joints are hurting, you need to fix that first before lifting, assuming you can't lift while they're in pain or stiff. If you're new to aikido, wrist pain and pain from sitting in seiza, etc. will happen. It's normal. You'll get better, and that pain will either go away or will become smaller over time. If you're 3 months into it, you still feel that pain, your aikido teacher doesn't have a solution, and it's preventing you from lifting weights, quit. You're better off. Because nobody needs that crap. Joints are not something you mess with.