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May
21
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
Full resistance, not necessarily force. The two are different. And yes, those arts do involve fully resisting opponents. But I'm not saying your training must involve getting beat up every day. In fact, the opposite is needed. You need a safe way to practice with full resistance so that you can keep coming back day after day and make progress, hopefully while having a lot of fun as well! You increase force as you are capable of doing so safely. That comes gradually.
May
21
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
I'll second the idea that you should do something like wrestling or Brazilian Jiujitsu before or at the same time as taking TKD, if TKD is something you want to do for self-defense. I've seen some good examples of TKD used in MMA competition. But those people had to also train in wrestling and BJJ, as well as one or more of: boxing, Muay Thai, or kick-boxing. It's not that TKD can't be useful. It can. But you definitely need to train in these other things to make it so. Especially BJJ, wrestling, and/or MMA. So you're not wrong, Juann Strauss.
May
19
comment is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
The business model that typifies a McDojo is one where students sign long-term contracts, there are lots of different belt colors, each belt color requires paying large fees for a testing, and everyone basically passes their tests. In a McDojo you're promised a black belt if you just pay the tuition, pay the testing fees, and have a real minimum (very low bar) of skill. They're in it for the money only. These places graduate black belts after just 2 years, sometimes less. And you even see 5 year old black belts. Their quality is poor. And often times, the instructor is a fraud.
May
18
revised is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
added 2096 characters in body
May
18
answered is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?
May
15
comment where i can attack on enemy's body
I think he was fairly clear, in my opinion. I just answered the question. It seems like he's asking for advice on how to deal with 2 or 3 attackers, there's no place to run, and he wants to know how to put them down as fast as possible with the hardest punch. There are a number of assumptions he's making in this question. I tried to answer it as best I could.
May
15
revised where i can attack on enemy's body
added 137 characters in body
May
15
answered where i can attack on enemy's body
May
9
comment Stahara word usage
It is an interesting subject, though hard to describe. Yep. One common characteristic I see with a lot of these people is that they often haven't gotten very far into a particular martial art before they decide to break off and start their own. They come up with some unusual idea and think it's "everything". And they can be highly respected people, also. Like General Choi (founder of Taekwondo). He now emphasizes the "sine wave" rising and falling motion in forms. But the Japanese forms he learned never had that motion. And it's not clear (to me at least) that it's actually beneficial.
May
9
comment Stahara word usage
Maybe you could post this as a question, by the way.
May
9
comment Stahara word usage
One thing you can do is to look at the history of American martial arts. Like American Kenpo, for example. Ed Parker reinvented everything "because Americans learn differently than the Japanese do." Same with Stephen Hayes (ninjutsu). It's actually pretty common to see Americans coming up with their own brand of martial art. They have all kinds of ways of seeing things which they say separates their art from traditional Asian ones. In the 80's, this was so common that I could barely kick a rock down the street without it hitting one of these places. Hehe.
May
8
answered Stahara word usage
May
8
comment The (hidden?) meaning of “Karate is life”
Alright, BlackFlame3. I just converted my comments into an answer.
May
8
answered The (hidden?) meaning of “Karate is life”
Apr
25
comment How to avoid gassing out during a BJJ or Grappling tournament?
Yes, my advice for preventing over training comes from weightlifting. My reasoning is that weightlifting is all about destroying muscles and rebuilding them (with rest). Training in BJJ uses muscles also, aerobically and anaerobically. Recovery for aerobic training is usually a 48 hour ordeal, with 24 hours being minimal, and something only top athletes are able to do. Recovery for anaerobic training is much larger, which is why I say take one week out of 4 for low intensity exercise / rest. Recovery should be at the top of any athlete's priorities.
Apr
25
comment How to avoid gassing out during a BJJ or Grappling tournament?
Fast power lifts are actually done during competition. So train using free weights ahead of time. If you've ever done this in training, you'll notice that your heart rate goes through the roof. Putting a high load on your body and then having to repeat it a good number of reps will increase your cardiovascular endurance. So will sprints and other high intensity exercises. But the caution is to make sure you don't have a heart condition ahead of time. Many athletes don't know they do, and they just collapse and die doing their chosen sport (basketball, running, whatever).
Apr
25
comment How to avoid gassing out during a BJJ or Grappling tournament?
Right Dave, but we don't know anything about this person. While it was described as "during a competition", we don't know how this person trains normally in class. While we can imagine that all BJJ schools train hard, that may not be so. This person may also be a 2-4 month white belt in, for example, a BJJ school that doesn't allow free sparring in class. We have no idea. My advice is not an indictment of BJJ, but cautionary. And honestly, you're dead wrong for being against a doctor looking into this.
Apr
24
comment Proper form for tae kwon do spinning side kicks
Also, as you saw in that other question that Wudang Kid linked to, the number one thing to do in the spinning / reverse kicks is to look first. Turn your head around fast and then focus on the target. If you don't do that, you will be off balance. Remain upright. Rotate on the ball of the foot. Point your ground foot's heel at your opponent (toes point away) when you do your kick. Read the comments of that link. I described it all there.
Apr
24
comment Proper form for tae kwon do spinning side kicks
Well then, 7 months is a little too soon to expect any student to be able to do spinning and jump spinning kicks with any degree of competence. Those are advanced skills. You should worry more about basic kicks which don't do spinning or jumping. Get those right first. It typically takes 1.5 to 2 years of training three days a week to get at least "okay" at spinning kicks. That's a lot of hard work left to do. Don't feel too bad about your lack of skill right now, in other words. It will come. It's not expected that you be able to do this stuff well right now.
Apr
23
comment Proper form for tae kwon do spinning side kicks
Actually, I'm not sure. What is the green-yellow belt in your system? How long have you been taking TKD?