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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 58 votes cast
Jan
10
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Lots of different scenarios. Too many to go over here. Someone grabs your right leg, then jump up and towards your opponent with a high left knee to his body or face (clinch first for stability). Some do a high round kick to the head to escape the leg grab also. Alternatively, kani basami (scissors kick). If no leg is grabbed, but he's rushing in to tackle or push you over, grab hold of him first, then turn your body to face him while putting your leg down, and sprawl. Practice it with a partner. Tell him to do these things at random, so you're not expecting anything in particular.
Jan
9
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
As for the down-side of all kinds of spinning kicks, if an opponent is able to anticipate that you're doing any spinning kick, he will rush in towards you, neutralizing your kick completely as well as putting you in a very vulnerable position. You will have one leg on the ground, making you temporarily immobile and susceptible to being grabbed, tackled, your leg caught, and/or your base leg swept. It's wise to have a back-up plan in case this happens. Or avoid spinning kicks completely.
Jan
6
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Yes, they're both used effectively, but in different situations. I will say that the spinning side kick is a very powerful kick. Some would say the most powerful kick. Adding a hop forward (and landing your back leg on the ground at the same time as you complete the kick) would make it even more powerful. It's deceptive, too, making it hard to anticipate. But the spinning crescent kick is also hard to anticipate, just not as powerful. Targets are different in both kicks. The side kick will be to the front of the torso. The crescent kick to the side of the head.
Jan
6
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Just to clarify: The JKD kick in question is called a "spin kick" in JKD, and in TKD it's called "spinning side kick" (also known as "reverse side kick"). The TKD kick the original question asks about, I think, is the "spinning inside-to-outside crescent kick", because it's circular (what I interpret "cyclic" to mean from the context of the question). Are those the two kicks you want compared?
Jan
6
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Yes, you're right. A spinning side kick is linear. What I was imagining was Bruce Lee's most famous "Dragon Whips Tail" kick, which is another name for the spinning inside-to-outside crescent kick. In JKD, as in all kung-fu/wushu, you keep the leg unbent and locked during that kick. You use the hip/waist to control the kick and don't snap the kick out at the end like TKD does. At least in Jun Fan / JKD.
Jan
4
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
It's hard to know how to interpret that, though. "Direct" in JKD can mean that the kick impacts on the front of your opponent's body (in a direct line from you to your opponent). But Bruce Lee also said that it can hit at a 90 degree angle (at the sides of your opponent), if that is the most direct path. In this case, I think using a spin kick to hit the front of your opponent's body is wrong. The only way you can make that work is by stepping to the side of your opponent first. So I think your interpretation of "direct" might be wrong. Can you list the page number in "Tao of JKD"?
Jan
4
comment JKD spin kick vs. Taekwondo spin kick
Not sure, but I think what MehdiHaghgoo might be referring to is the fact that Taekwondo will often keep the knee bent during the spin and then snaps it out (extends the leg) at the very last moment to complete the kick. This is a two cycle/phase motion. And to be technical, you first turn the upper body, then lift the leg while rotating the lower body, and then snap the kick out. JKD, I believe, just turns everything simultaneously and keeps the kicking leg fully extended throughout the kick (emphasizing waist and hip strength). I'm not certain this is what he/she is referring to.
Jan
4
answered Can i do judo or jiu-jitsu even if I have braces?
Dec
31
revised What is Qi? What is (fa) jin ? Where can I learn them?
added 33 characters in body
Dec
31
answered What is Qi? What is (fa) jin ? Where can I learn them?
Dec
28
awarded  Investor
Dec
23
comment Which ITF Taekwon-do organisation has most members
You should read up on the schism that took place between Jeff Bolt and Anthony Goh when there was a similar legality question for the USA Wushu Kung-fu Association. That happened in the mid-90's. Those that followed the letter of the law broke off to form a new president for the organization. The old president (Anthony Goh) cried foul and claimed himself to be legitimate head. To this day, Anthony Goh is president, and the splinter group has called it quits. Lesson: It's hard to splinter off and succeed, even if you're legally correct. Friendships and connections matter the most.
Dec
22
comment does judo come to the power without judoga
True, Judo training would give you a pretty good idea of how to control or throw someone without a gi. To bridge the gap in your knowledge, however, you should train without a gi. Test it out. See what works and what doesn't. That's very useful knowledge that would eliminate the extra time you spend fumbling around with your grip trying to figure it out in real life. My opinion. Not sure if it's "necessary", but it would definitely help prepare you.
Dec
22
comment Which ITF Taekwon-do organisation has most members
I wasn't even aware of the schism that took place in 2002 until you mentioned it. It's been a long time since I trained in ITF. Well, that's sad to hear. I think the official ITF organization is the one managed under the original ITF board, which would be Chang Ung's ITF. It would probably have the most members just because they inherited the whole thing. But I know of no official member counts for any of the 3 organizations.
Dec
22
answered What are the advantage of wearing a rashguard under the Gi in BJJ?
Dec
18
awarded  Yearling
Dec
16
comment Martial art without exam and secrets
Actually, some martial arts do hold back certain new skills as well as refinements to existing techniques. It's not just a matter of not showing dangerous stuff until they're ready. It's often done to keep a business monopoly within the family. Only family members will be taught it and won't be allowed to show it to others. Granted, the stuff isn't going to give them super powers, but it might give them enough that they can generally beat their best students. Stuff like timing a punch combo so that you're half a beat faster. You can learn it elsewhere, though, if you look.
Dec
15
comment Martial art without exam and secrets
Let me give you an example of a bad teacher, though. I knew of a wing-chun teacher who only taught single hand chi-sao. When students asked about two hand chi-sao drills, they were told they had to wait until they were advanced enough. Normally, Wing Chun students very quickly move on to two hand chi-sao drills. But this teacher was milking his students for money, dragging out their instruction for years. According to some of his ex-students, he only taught the last remaining chi-sao drills to his top 3 students, who probably paid him a lot for the privilege.
Dec
15
comment Martial art without exam and secrets
JohnP, this is not necessarily due to a character flaw in the teacher. Sometimes they hold back instruction because their teacher gave them an order to only teach those techniques to a handful of "worthy" students (whatever that means). It's just part of the tradition. But usually these secret techniques don't really give the student any advantage over others. They're mostly just the stuff that's considered "too dangerous", so they restrict it to those students who aren't going to cause problems for the school.
Dec
14
answered Martial art without exam and secrets