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Jan
20
comment how to use o2 mask to training martial arts
You can take more breaths per minute to compensate for the reduced amount of air in any one breath, sure. That way you might get the same amount of oxygen per minute as you did without the mask. But very quickly you'll reach a limit on how many breaths you can take per minute, and you'll go into an anaerobic mode. If you want to be in an anaerobic state, you can accomplish that a number of ways, including by wearing weights and wrestling bigger guys. At least then you're doing something useful. This mask alone? It does nothing for you. What do you think you are accomplishing?
Jan
20
comment how to use o2 mask to training martial arts
@AFetter Correct me if I'm wrong, but reducing the amount of air you breathe should reduce the amount of oxygen you breathe by the same factor. Right? Regardless of how it works, the device fails to present any benefit to the user.
Jan
19
answered how to use o2 mask to training martial arts
Jan
15
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
14
comment How do blood chokes actually work?
No, they didn't look at the Vagus nerve firing. They merely took blood pressure measurements. But what they did show was one way the blood choke can work, which is by restriction of blood flow. That doesn't explain all of the cases where someone faints due to blood choke. It explains the chokes that take 5, 10, 15 seconds to work. It doesn't explain the ones that work instantaneously. And we know that strikes to the Vagus nerve causes people to faint also. There appear to be two mechanisms.
Jan
14
comment How do blood chokes actually work?
Blood pressure may not have been affected by the choke, that is correct. It doesn't have to be. What matters is that the Vagus nerve triggers a signal to the brain saying that the blood pressure has spiked too high. The Vagus nerve can be tricked into doing this by simply compressing it, stretching it, or striking it. The actual blood pressure is not necessarily increasing for it to send a "high blood pressure" signal to the brain. At least this is how I think it works in many cases. It might not explain all cases.
Jan
14
answered How do blood chokes actually work?
Jan
14
answered How a woman can teach martial art for men?
Jan
11
comment Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
... Making a tight lapel grab thwarts the wrist lock. In competition, that's going to be the problem with the standing lapel grab to outer wrist lock throw defense. You won't see flimsy grips in competition, just in class. Same goes for real life. What I'm saying is that it's more likely than you might think that you're going to have to struggle even with two handed wrist locks. But then, you can always sense that it's not working out and let go quickly. I'm just saying be conscious of that fact. Struggling with this while not having secured your opponent is a bad idea.
Jan
11
comment Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
There are a number of scenarios where the wrist can be manipulated. One is the lapel grab that you described. The other is the case BJJ tends to use it in, which is when you've established position on the ground and have control over your opponent. Then you're in a position to apply the wrist crank, but it usually isn't immediate and requires a struggle even if you have two hands cranking on his wrist. The lapel grab to outer wrist lock throw is something else. But it too has this problem. All it takes is for someone to make a fist for that wrist lock to be thwarted....
Jan
11
comment Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
@HuwEvans What you said is all good in theory. As I point out, it's rarely done in competition. To be in a position where you can take time out to crank on a wrist, you first need to be really good in everything else. Which I think is why this is less common in colored belts rather than the black belt ranks in BJJ. In Tomiki aikido and Hapkido competition, too, we don't see a lot of successful wrist manipulation, especially not the wrist lock throw. It's trickier than it appears. And just because you have the wrist by two hands, it doesn't mean you will very quickly submit your opponent.
Jan
7
comment Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
@DaveLiepmann I suppose anything can become your bread and butter and can be turned into a high percentage technique if you train it enough. It may just be that most people haven't trained it enough to be good at it, and maybe that's why it's low percentage for most people. Lots of BJJ black belts have made an effort to train wrist locks to a high degree of reliability. But then, maybe that's only because all their other stuff is good enough that they can deliver wrist locks reliably or know which situations are optimal for wrist locks and which aren't. You have to talk with them.
Jan
7
comment Is hitting hard objects really effective in making bones harder?
@pojo-guy Oh, that's very interesting! Thanks for sharing that.
Jan
7
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
By the way, interesting thing to note about the spear-handed strike in karate: It's not a strike with the tips of the fingers. It's a strike with the knife-edge of the hand. Your other arm is performing a standing arm-bar on your opponent (similar to a kimura), and as you do that you're coming to the side of your opponent, standing perpendicular to him. Then you bend him over with the leverage of your arm-bar, so he's sort of bowing. Then you do a downward knife-hand strike (your spear-hand strike is actually a knife-edge strike) to the base of his skull for a knock-out.
Jan
4
comment Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
@Tom I would tend to agree. I go over the strengths and weaknesses of Aikido here: martialarts.stackexchange.com/questions/4732/…
Jan
4
comment What are the main uses of aikido in self-defense?
@DaveNewton Yes, I have nothing against the idea that you might just happen to find yourself in a situation where a wrist lock is ideal. But the method of training for such a situation is the problem. Aikido spends a ton of time with wrist locks, yet they occur very infrequently in real fights. And when Aikido trains them, the uke is told to extend his arm (commit to it), not resist, go along with it, and try to continue holding on. That isn't realistic. Realistic training of wrist locks is fine with me, and should be encouraged as part of a well-rounded martial arts program.
Jan
3
comment Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
I definitely recommend getting your instructor in on it. Maybe ask him after class or during question & answer time in class (if you guys do that) if there's something wrong with doing what you're doing. If you can successfully take someone down from a lapel grab using it, then that says your classmates haven't been taught it and don't know to protect against it. It also says their grip needs to be more nuanced for the real world. It's a perfect setup for your instructor to step in and demonstrate to the class what you're doing, what to do to prevent it, and how to use it against you.
Jan
3
comment Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
The reason you're able to get it from a lapel grab in class (not in competition, right?), is because people are more relaxed there and are working on what they've been told to work on. They're not expecting it. And most of the colored ranks haven't even seen it before. You're right to at least try it every now and then. Your classmates will improve their grip and strategy because of it. Just realize, though, that at some point this will stop working for you, and you'll find that it will actually cause you more grief than you want later on. So you'll probably abandon it eventually.
Jan
3
revised Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
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