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Dec
15
comment Martial art without exam and secrets
Let me give you an example of a bad teacher, though. I knew of a wing-chun teacher who only taught single hand chi-sao. When students asked about two hand chi-sao drills, they were told they had to wait until they were advanced enough. Normally, Wing Chun students very quickly move on to two hand chi-sao drills. But this teacher was milking his students for money, dragging out their instruction for years. According to some of his ex-students, he only taught the last remaining chi-sao drills to his top 3 students, who probably paid him a lot for the privilege.
Dec
15
comment Martial art without exam and secrets
JohnP, this is not necessarily due to a character flaw in the teacher. Sometimes they hold back instruction because their teacher gave them an order to only teach those techniques to a handful of "worthy" students (whatever that means). It's just part of the tradition. But usually these secret techniques don't really give the student any advantage over others. They're mostly just the stuff that's considered "too dangerous", so they restrict it to those students who aren't going to cause problems for the school.
Dec
14
answered Martial art without exam and secrets
Dec
1
revised Doing MMA or a doing multiple individual martial arts, which is more effective?
added 54 characters in body
Dec
1
revised Doing MMA or a doing multiple individual martial arts, which is more effective?
added 54 characters in body
Nov
30
answered Doing MMA or a doing multiple individual martial arts, which is more effective?
Nov
19
comment Are there any styles that are geared to people over 61?
Yup. Maybe the original poster did not mean that the only choices had to be something like karate, or maybe he'll reconsider. Aikido seems like a perfect alternative to me.
Nov
19
comment Are there any styles that are geared to people over 61?
Oh hey, I didn't consider Aikido. But yes, that certainly qualifies as an art that goes out of its way to end conflicts non-violently. Yes, there's a lot of opportunity within Aikido to hurt someone, but every Aikido school I've been to is about control and doing the least harm. Anyway, the author of the question indicated he was primarily interested in karate or something like karate. Aikido definitely does not qualify. But maybe the author would reconsider it.
Nov
19
answered Training martial arts in china
Nov
19
answered Are there any styles that are geared to people over 61?
Nov
17
comment Aikido yonkyo grip
+1 for the comment that adrenalin will nullify it in real life. It's true. Pinpoint accuracy and fine motor skills will not happen in real life. In fact, trying to grab a flailing hand in real life doesn't generally go very well. It only seems to work in training and when you're semi-comfortable trying things with friends spontaneously. I thought long and hard about how best to apply Aikido technique. My feeling is that the element of surprise is absolutely vital to ensuring it "works". You can't let on what you're doing. They shouldn't even notice you going for their hand/wrist. My opinion.
Nov
12
comment Frequent ribcage injuries, is this normal?
Chiropractors aren't trained in PT, generally (unless they're actually licensed PT's). Though, they often try to treat their patients with some pseudo-PT they believe they're qualified to do. See a qualified PT for PT, not a chiropractor. As for chiropractic practice (the bone stuff), that's bogus also. That clicking you hear is the same thing that happens when you crack your knuckles. It's placebo. It makes you think something is happening. It's not. The alignment of the spine or joints does not change after chiropractic manipulation. If it did, you should be very worried.
Nov
11
answered Frequent ribcage injuries, is this normal?
Oct
30
comment Style vs instructor
Ah, at age 16 you are in your prime. No joke. This is your time to work hard and go far. As for paying for classes and yet being forced to just teach and never learn (if that's what you're doing), then that is a raw deal. Black belts do a lot of assistant instructing. It's part of your training to learn how to lead a class. But, that should not be the only thing you're doing. You need to keep making progress yourself. It's give and take. When it's just take, you need to re-negotiate with the instructor. Sit down in private and talk about it with her.
Oct
29
answered Style vs instructor
Oct
28
comment Purpose of exchange block in toigye form
Nothing in a form is just "getting you in position" for something. There's a good reason for everything you see. You'll figure it out once you understand kata bunkai and classical jujitsu. Forms represent answers to common, universal self-defense situations. It's mostly jujitsu techniques. There are no blocks, generally (blocking is taught in sparring, not in solo forms). And in general, when you're analyzing a form for self-defense, you will see that a move usually only has one or two possible explanations, but you need to understand jujitsu first before you can see that. In my opinion.
Oct
27
comment Purpose of exchange block in toigye form
What a simple question, but the answer would honestly take pages and pages to explain. I might post an answer if I get the time. In the meanwhile, please research something called, "kata bunkai". Yes, it's Okinawan karate, not Taekwondo, but as it turns out, Okinawan karate is the grandfather of Taekwondo (Shotokan karate is its father). There's not a lot of good bunkai-like analysis going on in Taekwondo circles, in my opinion, and so it is recommended that you look at Okinawan karate kata bunkai instead. But even then, you'll need to understand something about classical jujitsu. Deep!
Oct
27
comment Only one ankle weight when kicking
I could answer this question, but I'd rather not encourage anyone to use ankle weights. They almost always cause knee damage over time and should be avoided, even when running. There's no benefit to using them, also. If the goal is to increase the force and speed of your kick, ankle weights won't do that. The force that ankle weights apply is downward, not resisting the kick in the direction the kick is actually going, which is what you need. You're far better off working on strength training instead. Please ditch the ankle weights. You will be sorry later on if you don't.
Oct
23
answered Which will results in more brain damage, being a heavy weight or lightweight boxer? Thought question
Oct
22
awarded  Nice Answer