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seen Jul 8 at 20:23

Feb
10
comment Should I start competition or wait for green belt
Yeah, I agree with Dave Newton. Competition can be a lot of fun and very useful. But some kids (and adults) don't like to compete, for a bunch of reasons. You really just have to know what you yourself want from your BJJ training, and stick to that. You don't need to compete (unless you're told you have to by your instructor).
Jan
24
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
And Thomas, you haven't given any examples of assumptions I made that are false. Nor have you explained why they are false. And by the way, anyone who trains in grappling arts will laugh at your statement that "takedowns are hard" or that somehow hooking the leg requires advanced skill. It's something you learn on day 1 in judo, jiu jitsu, jujitsu, sambo, wrestling, etc. It's a basic technique.
Jan
24
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
Thomas, what part of "That's why this is something you need to practice." did you not understand? I said this is something to practice not once but three times in my response. Oh, I didn't say "train". You're right, that's so different.
Jan
22
answered Will Power Training affect your grappling skills?
Jan
17
answered What are good solutions for MMA training with half long hair?
Jan
17
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
Yes, the ground is a great equalizer. If someone is attacking you who's larger and has longer reach, then taking it to the ground is often the best choice. On the ground, that size advantage is worth a lot less than on the feet, especially if this is someone not trained in grappling.
Jan
13
answered Continuously exhaling while attacking or blocking
Jan
10
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
I thought that was common sense, though? Obviously there are things that you're going to encounter that nobody else will, and vice-versa. The type of attack that I described is actually fairly common in my opinion. It happens in an instant. A guy decides to go off on you. He rushes you and starts flailing his arms around (not a trained fighter). I see this in lots of videos of real fights. It happened to me. It happened to several friends of mine. I think it's definitely worthy of practice. And like I said, it spills over into many other scenarios, so there's a lot of benefit to working on it.
Jan
9
answered Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
Jan
8
answered What does a free fighting teacher teach
Jan
8
awarded  Commentator
Jan
6
answered How should I look for an “open” tournament near me?
Jan
3
answered Can I start training in tae kwon do at age 16?
Jan
3
comment Video of a person doing Qigong where somehow many others cannot lift him easily?
Well, I for one think it does deserve some discussion here in a martial arts forum, because this sort of thing goes on a lot in martial arts as proof of the existence of chi energy and the ability to use it by doing martial arts and chi-kung. It's certainly bogus stuff akin to magic, but it needs to be shown for what it is in order to make sure people don't waste any of their time on it.
Jan
1
comment Taekwondo and muscle imbalance
Back and bicep muscles are almost never stressed in TKD. I don't think you'll ever see pulls on those. As for the back, you're always upright in TKD. About the only technique you might see in TKD which torques the back is the butterfly kick. But most TKD schools don't teach it (it's taught primarily in kung-fu styles). The butterfly kick requires tension in the back throughout the technique as well as forming an arch in the back. That can stress lower back muscles.
Jan
1
comment Taekwondo and muscle imbalance
A good amount of importance is placed on stretching in TKD. This is probably okay, but not optimal, by the way. Stretching often erodes muscle strength. Instead, "functional" stretching should be done. It's different from the types of stretching typically done in TKD. But TKD does a kind of functional stretching anyway, when they perform kicking / punching drills at the beginning of class. That's where you warm up the muscles, which makes them less susceptible to pulls and strains.
Jan
1
comment Taekwondo and muscle imbalance
And as far as hamstring pulls, these can occur when kicking front kicks, round kicks, hook kicks, and ax kicks. Anything which utilizes the hamstring. During the first part of the round kick, for example, you use the quad muscles, but it's when you pull your kick back when you use hamstrings. Sometimes you can get a pull that way, because you're pulling back harder than your hamstrings are capable of. Landing, too, from a kick can introduce heavy loads on the hamstring as you get into a low stance. But is it muscle imbalance or just lack of warming up? I say it's mostly the latter.
Jan
1
comment Taekwondo and muscle imbalance
The hamstring and groin pulls happen pretty rarely in TKD, but they do happen. I think it's almost always due to incorrect leg positions during a kick. Like when you do a side kick, you want the supporting leg to have the foot pointing behind you. That opens up the groin for the side-kick. But, what if you're sparring someone, and it happens so quickly that you didn't have time to get the base leg into proper position for the side-kick but decided to do the side-kick anyway? Then the groin isn't opened up, and the force of the kick fights against it, causing a groin pull.
Dec
31
answered Arch support and martial arts shoes
Dec
31
comment Name That Kempo Style
Maybe White Tiger Kempo? A lot of what I see in what you wrote points to Ed Parker, Nick Cerio, Villari, and the Kajukenbo system. Another thing to keep in mind is that "kenpo" is often used interchangeably with "kempo", even in the same martial art. Sometimes it's spelled a different way just to spin off a school and separate from the main branch, but it's often just up to a particular preference. There's also "5 Animal Kempo" out there. I don't know if any of those styles are a direct hit.