Reputation
Top tag
Next privilege 4,000 Rep.
Access 'trusted user' tools
Badges
6 19
Newest
 Enlightened
Impact
~27k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 3 helpful flags
  • 56 votes cast
2d
comment What are the main uses of aikido in self-defense?
In my experience, it's the opposite. Many of the Aikidoka I've met have been more hot-headed and egotistical than BJJ and MMA guys, or pretty much any martial art style I've seen. To this day, I have not figured out why that is. But this is anecdotal. We don't have any way of determining which style imparts bad intentions on the student. I will say, though, that it doesn't really matter what others do with an art. It's what you do that matters. If you go into any martial art and come out thinking you're invincible, you might end up looking for trouble. BJJ/MMA/etc. are very humbling styles.
Apr
18
comment What are the main uses of aikido in self-defense?
Yeah, I don't really see a difference between self-defense and fighting in the practical sense. I guess you're making a distinction between doing as little as you need to in order to escape (as in "self-defense"), and going all the way to beating someone (as in "fighting"). I think you won't be able to escape without knowing how to fight, period. You might get lucky, but it's not reliable. Whereas, guys that learn styles that prepare them for fighting are able to escape these real-world situations much more reliably.
Apr
17
comment What are the main uses of aikido in self-defense?
Well if you're fine with what Aikido teaches, no problem. Keep doing it. That you believe you're just doing "self-defense" and not actually learning how to fight tells me you haven't really thought about what it means to be in a real life confrontation. Most important is being familiar and comfortable with each range of fighting: free fighting, clinch, and ground. Maybe add stick and knife training to the mix also. Otherwise you're going to freeze up or make terrible mistakes the moment you're in a situation you don't recognize and haven't trained to deal with.
Apr
17
comment What are the main uses of aikido in self-defense?
Also just wanted to note that yes, kung-fu and karate also do a lot with the wrist grab. You can see it in kata. The fist chambered at the hip? That's a wrist grab. So in karate and kung-fu, you're doing a lot of grabbing (either his wrist or the end of his sleeve), and pulling it back to your hip with your left hand while striking with the right hand. This is usually to unbalance and throw while simultaneously striking. Fun to think about, but it's not something you'll encounter for real. It's only done as a defense. And karate/kung-fu people rarely even know about it.
Apr
17
comment What are the main uses of aikido in self-defense?
Yes, many forms of martial arts do the old "wrist grab" stuff. Doesn't mean it's very useful. Aikido practices it because Aikido inherits its style from classical jujitsu, from Samurai origins. In these Samurai ryu, people were taught to grab the wrist to prevent someone from drawing their sword. So in that context, wrist grab defenses were actually useful. For most modern, real-world situations, it rarely comes up. So to dwell on it and spend lots of time on it is time inefficient. There are more important things to go over.
Apr
2
comment How to avoid knee injury? (Tae Kwon Do)
I recommend stopping all activity that causes knee pain, first. Second, head to a sports medicine doctor or physical therapist to figure out what's going on. You might have a serious knee issue. TKD can cause long-term chronic knee injury, even if you're doing right with the right form. Sorry to tell you that. Yes, weight training helps (squats in particular). But have a PT prescribe the exercises. Don't just think you can try stuff on your own. This is serious stuff. Do not go back to TKD until you've figured it out. I can't emphasize that enough.
Mar
20
comment Avoiding Knuckle Scrapes with Bag Work
Haha. No problem. Give it a try and see how it goes. Just make sure the ones you get have no padding. You'll actually have better luck if you look for the cheapest ones you can find. The more expensive kinds have padding and individual finger guides, etc. Those are a nice idea, but it works best when it's just a mitten (no fingers) and no padding. I also think vinyl is the best material.
Mar
20
comment Avoiding Knuckle Scrapes with Bag Work
Have you tried bag gloves? They're not boxing gloves. I'm talking about the kind that's really very thin, not the padded kind of bag glove. Something like this: vintagetoys.com/toys/classified/2359
Mar
16
comment How to fix velcro wrist strap on boxing gloves?
So there's no tear in the glove? It's just that the velcro has worn so much that it no longer works?
Mar
14
comment Is 16 to late of an age to start hapkido or judo?
Completely agree with this, Dave. So many people put off doing martial arts because they believe they're not in shape enough to start. I think it comes from anxiety. They think they'll be laughed at or teased. It's not true. No beginner is expected to be able to walk into a martial arts school and be particularly good at anything the first day. Or even the first year. And the type of conditioning you can do on your own often doesn't translate well into the types of physical activities you do once you're in a martial art. So don't wait. Just do it.
Mar
2
comment Blisters from sticks
By the way, your diagram shows blister locations exactly where I would expect them. The locations aren't the problem. Your grip isn't the problem. Your problem is just your hand hasn't gone through enough / proper conditioning to get calluses. Later you'll get calluses on all of those points, and the blisters will no longer happen.
Feb
27
comment Do pins in judo have to be standard pins?
Yeah in our Judo club in high school (an offshoot of the British Judo Association), so long as you could hold your opponent in more or less the same position for 30 seconds (we had 30 seconds, but official rules are 25 seconds I think), it counted as a full point. It didn't even matter if you were in an official hold, so long as it was a hold. So there was a good deal of slack given to what a "pin hold" should actually look like. But that was our school. Not sure if it's the same in official olympic rules judo.
Feb
20
comment Are there any effective Kung Fu fighters in MMA?
Yes. And keep in mind that modern MMA has a lot more rules than older MMA did. The relaxed rules (allowing even kicks to the groin, fish-hooking, small joint manipulation, etc.) did not give the traditional fighters any better results. Now, it is dangerous to optimize for MMA rules, since it can leave holes in your defenses when it comes to real-life self-defense. That's why a lot of MMA people also did/do a self-defense oriented style like Gracie Jiujitsu.
Feb
19
comment Are there any effective Kung Fu fighters in MMA?
Yeah, I was going to mention Cung Le in my answer as well. Sanda / sanshou is legit. It just doesn't look anything like what we think of as "kung-fu".
Feb
19
comment Are there any effective Kung Fu fighters in MMA?
A lot of times people complain about these sorts of fights. They say, "He didn't even use such-n-such martial art. This fight shouldn't be taken seriously." The answer to that is that people find out very quickly what works and what doesn't in these cases. If they're not doing something that resembles kung-fu (or aikido, or karate, or whatever), then it's probably because they realized in that very moment that none of what they know would apply in this situation. Either that, or they simply didn't have enough time to show their style, which happens a lot also.
Feb
19
comment Are there any effective Kung Fu fighters in MMA?
Yes, everyone has seen Lyoto Machida. He dominated the UFC for a good amount of time. And he bases his strategy, his footwork, and most importantly his timing, on his karate background. But, he's also a BJJ black belt and has put a lot of time into training for MMA. He is pretty far from being "pure" karate, but clearly he has taken something very positive from his karate training. That's what MMA is about. It takes what you know, tests it, and if it doesn't work, you must change. More recently I've been seeing a lot of Taekwondo black belts doing well in the UFC and other MMA venues.
Feb
18
comment Are there any effective Kung Fu fighters in MMA?
There was Jason Delucia from the early UFC's. He's an interesting guy. He started out as a 5 Animals kung-fu stylist. A few years before his UFC 2 debut (where he was tapped out by Royce Gracie), he accepted the "Gracie Challenge" to come and fight the Gracies at their school. He lost, and so he trained there in BJJ (for over a month I think). It was the stuff he learned there that he used in UFC 2, even though he was billed as a "kung-fu fighter". By then, he had completely discarded kung-fu.
Feb
18
comment Are there any effective Kung Fu fighters in MMA?
He studied kung-fu and karate when he was 16. He's a BJJ black belt under Renzo Gracie apparently. That appears to be his style. I've not seen really anything in his UFC fights that resembles kung-fu, but I could be wrong.
Feb
18
comment What is the liability issuewith personal defense classes?
Why don't you ask him to elaborate? Because it doesn't make sense. If kids can take any of the other classes, then there's no reason why they can't take all of them if they want. Unless you're saying that some of those classes are for adults only. In which case, I can understand that. You can't teach kids the same way as adults, for the most part, depending on the age of the kids. Past about age 13 or 14, they're pretty well ready to take adult classes. Age 18 might be required for knife and gun training, don't know. Insurance is another issue.
Feb
17
comment MMA - Long Hair
I still like the idea of using swim caps. Just make sure it's a comfortable fit, then cut out a hole out at the top to make it more breathable, or make swiss-cheese holes throughout. And yes, it's a duplicate of that thread where we talked about it. Cycling skull caps may not stay on your head as well as swim caps will. Your ear protection idea is good, though, but it might get too hot for general practice. Good maybe for tournaments where you're knocking heads around? Of course the better idea is to simply tie your hair down somehow.