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16h
comment Filipino martial arts question and teacher respect
@Sardathrion: Well, we tend to put our martial arts teachers on pedestals. It distances them and makes them less approachable. But it's a two-way street. Teachers should make a point to reach out to their students and be more personable and approachable. And not just to the students they like, to everyone. That way there aren't just these cliques where some students are favored by the teacher, and the rest are outsiders. I've seen that happen many times before. This is all human behavior. It only changes if the teacher takes proactive steps to change it.
Jul
27
comment Do you take supplements like protein when you train in Martial Arts?
You wouldn't happen to have a study or preferably a meta-study to back up the claim of 3:1 carb to protein ratio improving recovery? I don't even see how protein would improve recovery from a theoretical perspective. If anything, it should hinder it (because it might slow down the absorption rate of the carbohydrate).
Jul
21
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Jul
21
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
Internal mechanics is just a phrase that means, "This is what you're doing inside your body, mechanically." You're doing stuff with bones, joints, tendons, and muscles. Internal mechanics are hard (or sometimes impossible) to see from the outside and hard to learn from text or even video instruction, so you usually need someone to give you an interactive, hands-on demonstration in person. Mike Sigman is someone who has done a lot to educate the Western world on the subject of internal mechanics, but he didn't make it up. If you ever have a chance to train with him, do it!
Jul
21
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
One other thing. The reason why Taiji forms are done so slowly is because it's really hard for beginners to maintain proper internal mechanics during the movements of the form. It's not because of meditation or because you're bringing your "chi" to your palms or whatnot - although you certainly can do that if you want. It's the amount of mental concentration, where you're constantly adjusting yourself to ensure that the jing you're doing is being done correctly. It's hard! You can NOT do it fast. And that's why it's done slowly. Nothing mystical going on. It's all internal mechanics.
Jul
21
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
@sirdank: Internal mechanics are at the core of all internal martial arts (Taiji, Xing-yi, Bagua, etc.). They are the foundation. The "jing" are all qualities of motion based on internal mechanics. The chan-su jing (silk reeling) practice of Chen style trains the internal mechanics of P'eng, Lu, Ji, and An jing. The forms add more jing (over 20!). At the root of all jing is p'eng jing. You start with p'eng jing if you want to understand internal mechanics. From there, you add silk reeling. And then add forms. Glad to hear you're investigating Chen style. Hopefully they can teach you.
Jul
20
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
@sridank: At this point we're just repeating ourselves. I believe you've been taught a kind of "health" Taiji that doesn't train internal mechanics. Chi is the central focus of what your Taiji instructor teaches, apparently, and it's probably because he/she doesn't know internal mechanics and therefore can't teach it. Without internal mechanics, it is not Taiji. It only looks like Taiji from the outside. That's not me saying that. That is from the current grandmasters of the Chen style. They and their students can demonstrate internal mechanics. Find a Chen style school near you to confirm.
Jul
20
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
@sridank: I have come to realize exactly the opposite. If your teacher says it's about "chi", they're not telling you anything useful. They can't teach you how to use it for fighting. Instead, look for someone who can teach you internal mechanics. The mechanics aren't esoteric or mystical. P'eng jing can be learned in person after just a 5 minute interactive demonstration with a good teacher. It doesn't require 10, 20, 30 years of meditation. The jings are purely mechanical, not "energy" exercises. Abstracting it to "chi" means you have a teacher who doesn't know what he/she is talking about.
Jul
17
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
@sirdank My instructor was a direct student of Master Chen Qingzhou, grandmaster of Chen style Taiji, and I've trained with Master Chen Qingzhou directly as well. He's apparently not legit enough for you, eh?
Jul
3
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
No, I don't buy it. I understand that there are books about this, written in Chinese, which say things similar to what Sridank wrote. But I also understand that authors of cryptic stuff like this aren't going to tell you anything you don't already know. Ie, you either know it already, and it makes sense to you, or you don't know it, and the text makes no sense to you. I understand uprooting. But I also see that quote as deliberately cryptic and utterly useless for telling someone else what uprooting means. It's a non-answer.
Jun
21
comment How do you prevent/mitigate finger injuries in judo/bjj?
Yeah, like Dave said, tape your fingers. Also, give yourself some time to recover before you use the tape. Next, talk with your doctor about anti-inflammatory medications specifically for the joints. You can try any NSAID such as ibuprofen, but I think there are more targeted drugs for this condition (Celebrex maybe?). Ice your joints immediately after a workout. Supplements like glucosamine and chondroitin might help, but there's not a lot of evidence for it (give it a try and see). A doctor might be able to tell you more.
Jun
14
comment How do Boxers and other Martial Arts practitioners deal with pain?
One other thing. When you're in a fight and are getting hit, the guy you're fighting against can seem like a madman bent on killing you. It's easy to think you just need to quit and get out of there. That's also a mental thing. You're scared, and he's scaring the crap out of you with all his wild punches and violence towards you. Keep your mind under control. Fight back. Raise your energy level up in response to his. But don't be stupid. Keep your wits. You'll need to fight smart, not just hard. Realize that his wild swinging punches are out of desperation and demonstrate a lack of skill.
Jun
14
comment How do Boxers and other Martial Arts practitioners deal with pain?
How to keep yourself from panicking after being hit? It's implied in what I wrote. It comes from realizing that you've been hit before, and it wasn't as bad as you thought at the time, and so it's not that bad now when you get hit. You can also prepare your mind ahead of time, without ever having been in a fight. You envision the fight, getting hit, and repeat to yourself, "That was nothing. Keep going. It's just pain. It doesn't matter." Then when you get into a real fight, you remember this and focus on surviving. Don't allow yourself to think about giving up, laying down in defeat.
Jun
11
comment Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
We don't disagree on the technicals, just the way you might dismiss the back kick outright in favor of the side kick. Both have their advantages and disadvantages, and you'll get no argument from me that the back kick is inherently less useful during sparring than the side kick is. But, for a small number of real life scenarios (self-defense), the back kick is quite well suited. That's all I'm saying. Hybrid opening of the hip, though, is mechanically superior and used by most martial arts that do back kicks. The question is how much and when, not usually "if" they open it up.
Jun
10
comment What are the main uses of aikido in self-defense?
Thanks. Yes, the 6 feet away ki projection thing is pretty rare in aikido. But the other more subtle things that I mentioned aren't at all rare. Yes, you do need real sparring to show you how you can possibly apply what you've learned. The way you train matters, not what style you train. Find an MMA or Gracie JJ school, enroll, and stay there for 6 months to a year. Take what you learned from that into your Aikido training. Your Aikido school won't like you doing it in class, of course, but you can roll (spar) after class or in private. It is very eye opening. Highly recommended.
Jun
7
comment Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
Agree about wrenching the spine and limitations on movement. But this is mostly alleviated by doing a hybrid of both (as I described in my response), which most martial arts actually do. It might be demonstrated with knee and toes pointing down, but people end up twisting outwards a bit at the end and opening up the hip a bit at the end. This allows more flexibility in the back and hip, more power, stability, and almost feels like a side kick at the end. It doesn't wrench the back. And there advantages over the side kick (not as telegraphed, quicker setup for opponents behind you, etc.).
Jun
5
comment Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
Yeah, that video shows a tendency to open the hip sooner than arts like Shotokan would do it. Both Shotokan and that branch of TKD practice it like a back kick to begin with and finishing like a back kick and side kick hybrid. It's for mechanical reasons, to keep balance, and to see your opponent. "Pure" back kicks are more rare in martial arts for those reasons. But TKD practitioners generally show a tendency to open up their hips earlier, due to the habit of using the side kick (one of their favorite kicks) and the muscle memory from side kicks.
Jun
4
comment Proper Foot Orientation on Spinning Back Kick
I discussed the spinning kicks here in depth. Does this answer your question: martialarts.stackexchange.com/questions/2935/…
Jun
3
comment What is the best way to avoid armlocks?
Can't tell if that was a joke or not, Juann Strauss. First, you can't actually bite fingers off. Second, against someone who knows how to put you in these things, you won't get a chance to bite at their hands or arms. Assuming you could even get to a position to bite, he'd see that and take advantage of the fact that you're now way off balance. Against untrained people, sure try anything if that's all you have. But it's better to prepare for these things by assuming you're fighting someone who knows what they're doing. My opinion. Biting isn't usually the best option.
May
29
comment What is the best way to avoid armlocks?
I kind of wanted you to hold off on voting for the best answer until there was more than just my answer. It's good to see what other people come up with. But thanks for your vote. :)