Reputation
Next tag badge:
76/100 score
16/20 answers
Badges
11 26
Newest
 Good Answer
Impact
~89k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 4 helpful flags
  • 81 votes cast
10h
comment How necessary is youth and flexibility in Jiu Jitsu? As compared to Boxing?
Ed O'Neill, the actor and star of TV's "Married With Children", started his BJJ training at age 41 and received his black belt at age 61. FYI: bloodyelbow.com/2015/1/15/7551375/…
Apr
13
comment Systema: “Beyond the physical” force generation
@Dungarth Indeed. And it might interest you to know that the internal mechanics of styles like T'ai Chi and Xing Yi involve other ways of achieving mechanical advantage and other interesting mechanical phenomenon. One of its most basic elements is the use of the body's structure, using the muscles mostly just to hold the bones in place. It's like how a stone arch works. Pressing against someone who can do this is like pressing against solid ground. Fun stuff. Not hard to learn, with the right instructor. Nothing mystical or non-physical going on, either.
Apr
12
comment Systema: “Beyond the physical” force generation
@sirdank Yes, if you're looking for a mysterious, metaphysical "force" that isn't explained by known physical causes, I can't help you. Keep looking for it, and if you find it, come back and post about it. We all want to learn.
Apr
11
comment Judo - Why does the ref sometimes pause the match when it goes to the ground?
Yes, and because the referee's judgment is completely subjective, it means some referees allow more ground time than others. It also means that some competitors will simply go into a turtle position or completely on their belly to stall for time, allowing themselves to be put back on their feet. This makes judoka very aggressive about how quickly they try to do things. Most judoka don't even wait for their opponent to hit the ground before they start doing a juji-gatame or something. Haha. Very different ideas compared with BJJ.
Apr
11
comment Training to avoid freezing up in self-defense
The best answers here are by Slugster and Dave Liepmann. The answer is mostly to increase the amount of resistance / non-compliance of your opponent. The standard "canned" responses taught in self-defense classes are nearly useless. The moment you try it in real life, you'll realize you haven't prepared for it at all. Deep down, you know it won't work. That includes black belts in karate or TKD, etc. They haven't trained for a situation where the guy grabs you, tackles you to the ground and beats on you relentlessly until you've actually overcome him.
Apr
8
comment What is the minumum training time to remain proficient?
... It's fine practicing at home and skipping the workout at the gym, if that's something you can do, during days that are really bad for your asthma. I'd even go so far as to say take the day off. Rest. Get more sleep. Maybe watch video instruction or read up on technique. You can also use the time to visualize what you need to work on. Research shows that visualizing what you need to do is more beneficial than not doing anything. Still not as good as actual practice, but pretty useful nonetheless.
Apr
8
comment What is the minumum training time to remain proficient?
@DeathToxic Well, I think if I were you I would go easy during workouts, really light. Because basically that's all you can do when you have asthma. Aside from that, I'd look into medications and other potential treatments for asthma. Some people find their asthma vastly improves with modifications to diet (ditching meat and dairy and eating more beans, fresh fruit, plant-based food, for example), dealing with allergens in their food and environment like I said before, drinking more water, and getting more sleep...
Apr
7
comment What is the minumum training time to remain proficient?
... you sleep or spend the most time in. Also, if you work in an office, put one there. It's going to help you immensely during allergy season.
Apr
7
comment What is the minumum training time to remain proficient?
... For asthma, I'd look into doing all you can to avoid the triggers and get properly medicated (see an asthma specialist doctor (MD)). Also, I have a friend who swears that her asthma is triggered in part because of her lactose intolerance and possible other food allergies. You say you have other allergies. Maybe you should see an allergy specialist first. They might be able to tell you if you're allergic to certain foods or something in your environment (cat dander, etc.). Also, invest in an air cleaner device with HEPA filter. Put one in every room of your house, especially where...
Apr
7
comment What is the minumum training time to remain proficient?
Allergies and asthma, flus, colds, over-training, under-training, stress in your life, etc. all have an effect on your athletic performance and your mental functioning (emotional state, motivation, focus, etc.). No doubt about it. It's something everyone goes through on occasion. Asthma in particular can just drain all of your energy. And time off from working out will cause a reduction in performance both physical and mental. It will take some time to recover. If it's a chronic condition, then that's something you just have to take into account when you program your training...
Apr
1
comment Practicing a form with closed eyes
@css1971 Quite true! I'll add that to my answer. Thanks for pointing that out. It's actually a very important detail.
Mar
24
comment Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight
Yup. It's clearly edited. I have seen similar things happen that I know are real, though. Just not with the glasses. :)
Mar
24
comment Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight
Just saw this and thought it was appropriate: i.imgur.com/OrzsG4N.gifv
Mar
23
comment Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight
And yes, this is going to depend on the individual's abilities. Risk is increased, generally, with high kicks. But if you train these enough, you've probably already made all the mistakes you can possibly make, and so you have learned to do it more reliably. And more importantly, you've learned how to recover if it goes wrong. Kicks to the head are very surprising, also, and catch people off guard. The reward of nailing a high kick is large: a potential KO or damaging your opponent so much that it stops the fight instantly.
Mar
23
comment Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight
+1 for "busting out a roundhouse kick to your assailant's brainpan"! Hilarious!
Mar
23
comment Is it common and expected that shifus give theory classes about stuff like TCM, meridians and joints?
... extending your opponent's arm out. In Taiji, most forms of Taiji will do this chicken beak "attack". But the setup in Chen style Taiji (the origin of all the other forms) shows a circular motion is performed close to your body first before extending that chicken beak out to the side. Aha! There's the chin-na on the guy's wrist. The extending out is a grab to his wrist while twisting and locking his arm. The next move is a palm strike in the other direction. This can be a hit to the chin or a shoulder dislocation or an arm break. All perfectly valid, and don't involve mystical nonsense.
Mar
23
comment Is it common and expected that shifus give theory classes about stuff like TCM, meridians and joints?
... For example, a chicken / crane's beak "attack" to the head. This is often explained in kung-fu and taiji as a finger tip strike to the pressure point on the top of your opponent's head. Death is supposedly the result. Nonsense. Go ahead and try it to your sparring partner. It won't work. He'll say, "Quit it! You're annoying me." No, that technique has a valid marital application, but it doesn't involve chi or dim-mak. To understand it, you have to look at how it's setup in the form. What comes before it? It can be an ear grab, for example. It can be a wrist chin-na followed by ...
Mar
23
comment Is it common and expected that shifus give theory classes about stuff like TCM, meridians and joints?
@LuisMasuelli Hehe. Well, I think the best grapplers out there, and the styles that produce the best grapplers, don't use TCM as the basis of their stuff. And I know for a fact they would absolutely not improve if they knew it. They wouldn't. Now, that said. Understanding why a strange looking kung-fu / taiji technique is the way it is involves understanding the martial application. My experience is that people usually (99% of the time) learn some bogus explanation for something and have to employ TCM / chi theory / dim-mak to make any "sense" out of its purpose in the form...
Mar
23
comment Is it common and expected that shifus give theory classes about stuff like TCM, meridians and joints?
Very true. TCM is a red herring. Many people (myself included) chased it only to find out it's basically nonsense. Many hundreds of hours wasted. It's time better spent training. People think they're going to learn TCM and gain all kinds of super powers. Ask yourself this: Has anyone come along yet, who isn't a fictional character in a kung-fu movie, that has these super powers and can demonstrate them working in a real fight? And I'm not talking about rumors, myths, legends, etc. Total fantasy. Shame on us for not figuring it out yet, as a community. People still insist it's real.
Mar
21
comment Are there any effective Kung Fu fighters in MMA?
... able to deliver that spear-hand thrust, you're also able to deliver a punch to the face. Which is more effective? My money is on the punch to the face, because it requires less precision and is less risky to your fingers. In a competition where neck strikes are allowed, fighters would defend their necks more. And again, this requires you to become, essentially, an MMA fighter in order to pull it off reliably. My thoughts anyway.