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2d
comment How to learn these movements?
@TonyD That is not tricking on that video, though. That's Taekwondo done with a little flash for demonstration. The "flash" that they do doesn't even scratch the surface of the kind of flash you see in tricking. That video shows pretty much all orthodox TKD kicks, with some entertaining setups such as stepping on someone who's crouched down and using them as a step to jump off of to get more air. Not in the same league as what they do in tricking.
2d
comment How to learn these movements?
That's true about the mechanics you described, if they don't already come from a contemporary wushu background before coming into tricking. And the tricking people recognize it and seem to admire it and want to do it the way wushu does it, but they just don't have the right instruction for that. As for it being an aerobic workout, it is to some people but isn't to others. To many people, tricking is martial arts done to an extreme. It's why there aren't a lot of women in it, but you'll see women in gymnastics and wushu all the time. Tricking has the martial vibe to it still, generally.
Oct
18
comment Is it respectful for someone of a coloured rank to date a black belt?
Good answer. If schools have a particular policy or etiquette rules in place about this, then you should follow those rules. Otherwise, socializing outside of class is not only expected but encouraged. That is often what draws people to learn martial arts - making new friends and socializing. I would just add one thing: Be careful that your relationship doesn't affect how you behave in class. In class, you behave as if you two are just students. Cordial. No PDA. Don't argue. Don't bring your outside emotions into class. If you can't do that, then don't get involved with someone there.
Oct
18
comment How to learn these movements?
This is tricking, not wushu. Wushu does have most or all of the individual techniques demonstrated in this video, but just not done the way they do them. Taekwondo is pretty far removed from tricking, but contemporary Wushu isn't. Barbell cleans and working on power strength training is good and can help in all sorts of ways, but the most direct way of training to do tricking is to find a gymnastics gym which teaches it and sign up for classes. Or find a contemporary (modern) wushu school and train there.
Oct
18
comment How to learn these movements?
Yes, it's tricking. But I wouldn't say it's not martial arts. The material is from martial arts, but done in a way that's all its own art and no longer solely for the purpose of martial arts. Contemporary wushu is similar in that respect also, yet it's still thought of as martial arts. And I think many contemporary wushu people go into tricking and vice-versa. There's a lot of overlap, and it's hard to say tricking doesn't have anything to do with martial arts. It certainly does, but that's not its primary focus.
Oct
16
comment Developing arm strength and stamina for boxing. Dumbbells or wrist weights?
You either hang a punching bag from the ceiling or set up a free-standing frame. There are do-it-yourself plans for both on the web. There are also stands you can get already made, but they tend to be wobbly, so check them out before you buy. Hanging from the ceiling means you need to find a support beam, and maybe even reinforce it. Personally, I'd opt for the stand first before hanging from a ceiling if it's in my home (due to the inherent abuse your ceiling will take).
Oct
15
comment Developing arm strength and stamina for boxing. Dumbbells or wrist weights?
The good thing about Olympic lifts is that they're very time efficient. One lift can work the entire body. Do 3-5 sets of 4 reps each, 2-3 times a week. Or look into Jim Wendler's "5/3/1 Program". It's designed to be time efficient and no-nonsense / very simple to understand and do. Buy your own equipment instead of going to a gym to save even more time (don't have to drive anywhere). Basic equipment: Olympic barbell, olympic weight plates, barbell collars (Lock-Jaws). Optional but very good to have: bench, squat rack, dumbbell set, dip handles, dip strap, lifting gloves, weight belt.
Oct
15
comment Developing arm strength and stamina for boxing. Dumbbells or wrist weights?
I am strongly against attaching wrist or even upper-arm weights. Don't do it. There are better ways to train that don't involve potentially screwing up your joints. The better way to increase muscle strength is through weightlifting with free weights. If you need to weight your body down, do so around the torso only. Wear a weighted backpack or attach a bungee cord to your waist using a dip belt or something (the other end of the cord attached to the wall or something). Especially do not attach weights to your wrists or ankles. That will blow your elbows, knees, shoulders, and hips.
Oct
15
comment Developing arm strength and stamina for boxing. Dumbbells or wrist weights?
Yes, people please do not use wrist weights or attempt to punch with dumbbells. That's just going to totally wreck your elbows, to the point where you need major surgery and might not ever be able to do a lot of things you take for granted. Bad bad idea... And Dave is 100% right about weights. Couldn't find anything about this answer that I disagree with.
Oct
6
comment how realistic is martial arts portrayed in the movie Old Boy?
Full movie is here, fyi: youtube.com/watch?v=WlXp3Uf9xT8
Oct
6
comment how realistic is martial arts portrayed in the movie Old Boy?
I guess you're talking about the corridor fight scene? youtube.com/watch?v=VwIIDzrVVdc
Oct
6
comment Which martial art would minimize hand injury?
The way I interpreted that question in the question I linked to was finding a martial art that didn't do much with the hands, assuming that hand contact of any kind was off-limits due to injury. In this new question, the question is very similar, except that the hands haven't been injured yet. This is someone who is trying to avoid injury. In the previous question I linked to, someone is trying to avoid re-injury. Very similar indeed. But I guess the primary difference might be that the one who hasn't injured his/her hands is willing to at least use them. The other author was not.
Oct
5
comment Which martial art would minimize hand injury?
This question is very similar to one of the previous ones: martialarts.stackexchange.com/questions/4258/…
Oct
5
comment Which martial art would minimize hand injury?
possible duplicate of Down a hand, looking for new martial art
Oct
3
comment Holding Thai pads safely
Yeah, a photo is the only way to go here. I suspect you're taking a lot of force into your wrists instead of allowing it to go down your arms and into your body. Sometimes there is no way to get your body behind it, depending on what you're trying to do, and so it ends up feeling like a speed focus pad, kind of dangled out there freely, and that's where it might torque your wrist. Aside from that, I'd say experiment with keeping your wrist relaxed vs. keeping it tight.
Oct
1
comment Practicing Mixed Martial Arts Versus Practicing One Specific Form of Martial Arts
I think you misunderstand MMA. MMA is a training methodology, not a set of techniques. It's a way of training so that you can see if your stuff is working against someone who is trying his best to do the same against you. It gives you skills in avoiding getting hurt while being able to get through his defenses. Without it, you just have theory. You can't actually use it reliably. And yes, MMA training can and often does incorporate knives and sticks. I would take MMA over Krav Maga any day. You might take this discussion to a forum like Bullshido if you really want to discuss it.
Sep
30
comment Practicing Mixed Martial Arts Versus Practicing One Specific Form of Martial Arts
(continued #2)... Lastly, we know from many real-world examples - both in no-rules competitions and in actual self-defense footage - that unless you train the way MMA trains, you can not gain competence in whatever technique you're developing. The way you train is what really matters. If you can't bring a technique into that kind of training, safely, then it will never be developed to such a skill level as to be competent and reliable in real-life self-defense. So it's worth is questionable.
Sep
30
comment Practicing Mixed Martial Arts Versus Practicing One Specific Form of Martial Arts
(continued) ... What MMA gives you, primarily, is what's known as a "delivery system". It gives you a core set of fundamental skills that allows you to deal with a struggling opponent's attacks and defenses, and be able to get in and deliver your strikes, chokes, control techniques, and submissions. Without that, your chances of success in real life are not very good. That's what is missing from most traditional martial arts such as karate. The techniques that are ruled out in MMA training due to safety aren't fundamental to these core skills....
Sep
30
comment Practicing Mixed Martial Arts Versus Practicing One Specific Form of Martial Arts
I see problems with all 3 of this answer's topics. But the one that I take issue with the most is the idea that MMA training is worse than other systems for self-defense due to the fact that it has rules for safety. In my opinion, you're fooling yourself if you think you can gain competence (reliable in real life) in self-defense by doing something that doesn't involve sparring with partners that are there to resist everything you do. MMA gives you that. Most "focused" (traditional and modern) martial arts don't. Those arts mistakenly believe that their stuff is too deadly for sparring....
Sep
16
comment How does a non-grappler train to be ready to avoid grappling in a real-world situation?
Even the best non-grappling fighters tend to get screwed up by grappling. And it's because they simply don't recognize the situation and therefore don't have any understanding of what to do in it. It's all how you train, not the style. If you want to prevent someone from grappling you, taking you to the ground, etc., then you have to be comfortable with that situation. You get comfortable with it by specifically training in it. Simply saying "step back and control the distance" isn't enough. Reality doesn't often work out nicely like you want it to. You will get caught. Then what?