2,106 reputation
312
bio website bankuei.wordpress.com
location Oakland
age 36
visits member for 1 year
seen 2 days ago

Just spent 2013 recovering from cancer and am now getting back into gaming. I grew up self-teaching out of the Red Box D&D, moved onto other systems from there, and got deep into indie RPGs with funky rules like letting players take narration or having GM-less systems, etc.

I mostly love rpgs that are either narrativist and drama focused, and/or tactically fun. Including games that do both.


Jan
28
answered Martial Art focused on upper body strikes
Jan
25
comment Close quarter's defense: when you stand face to face with an attacker
I think the reason you're finding they don't have a technique for that is because when someone is threatening and you see they're threatening you don't wait for them to get within your body space before taking action to get away? The folks who get that close either have run up on you from behind and are attacking or have a weapon at your side or back and are threatening you. Otherwise it only happens when two guys start playing the yelling/pushing game before fighting.
Jan
25
comment Close quarter's defense: when you stand face to face with an attacker
So, to clarify a) You cannot walk/run away, b) there's no obstacles you can put between you and the person, c) are they just talking trash? Is this life threatening?, d) do they have to get THAT close before you can act? Might they have a knife? Might they have friends? I feel like this question lacks critical context in a lot of ways. And, as Dave pointed out, grappling works as well. It's not like there's 1 miracle technique that works up close for everything. Tell us the situation w/o scraping off the reasons.
Jan
24
comment Close quarter's defense: when you stand face to face with an attacker
This question seems a little too general? It feels like the question boils down to "How SHOULD I hit someone?" to which there's as many answers as there are styles of defense. Can you give some more specifics as far as what you're looking for or limits to the situation?
Jan
22
comment Self-defense with hemiphlegia
Yep. I really emphasize looking into what is legal to carry.
Jan
21
answered Self-defense with hemiphlegia
Jan
7
awarded  Yearling
Dec
28
comment Can my body learn to split at 25?
I second PNF stretching techniques. The only restriction to people being able to do splits isn't age, but rather the angle of the femur head in the hip socket, which, for some, is set such they can never fully get splits. Otherwise, it's really just a matter of time and patience. And, along with flexibility - make sure to do strength exercises at the far ranges of your range of motion to stabilize your joint!
Dec
23
answered Defending against an aggressive and heavier opponent
Dec
16
answered Martial art without exam and secrets
Dec
12
answered Chinese Dadao info?
Nov
27
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
20
comment Reducing Soreness?
Yes, I'm trying to give people a layman's version. Here's the gross effect: gustrength.com/muscles:adaptive-shortening and here's a good video on the science side of what I was explaining youtube.com/watch?v=obM1uHucAbM (I have to remember more and more info is showing up on youtube these days...)
Nov
20
comment Reducing Soreness?
Finally found a decent layman's book: books.google.com/… Pg. 176 goes into muscle spindle adaptation to length , pg. 178-9 under Tendon Organ talks about the adaptation of the joint receptors. "...the activity of the muscle spindle depends on the muscle length and not the tension" - aka it measures rate of change in length, regardless of whether the muscle is active, or in a resting state. Too fast of a change from the expected position, stretch reflex is activated.
Nov
20
comment Reducing Soreness?
If you want the exact chemical reactions along the spindle pathways and how that affects calcium resistance etc. you'll have to do the work yourself. I studied up to the level of functionality for sports therapy not for the level of cellular medicine.
Nov
20
comment Reducing Soreness?
And, of specific interest to martial arts is that this is the neurology that allows for the trick where you pull/push in one direction then quickly go in the other direction and a person is unable to change force quick enough - the reciprocal inhibition created by those same muscle spindles makes it impossible physiologically to 'turn on' those same muscles. This happens at the spinal column so there's no conscious choice in the matter. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reciprocal_inhibition
Nov
20
comment Reducing Soreness?
A rate of change to a certain level produces the "braking action" I've noted: "The reflexly evoked activity in the alpha motoneurons is then transmitted via their efferent axons to the extrafusal fibers of the muscle, which generate force and thereby resist the stretch. " and above that, when it finally goes beyond that, produces the clasp knife response of a complete deactivation of the muscles: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clasp-knife_response The former produces muscle tears, the latter complete destabilization.
Nov
20
comment Reducing Soreness?
The second example in the picture, is effectively where the fibers return to after a muscle is left in a given state long enough - the afferent firing signals go to "this is neutral" rather than high or low. In kinesiology and much of PT this is used to help get lasting posture changes usually with around 30 second holds to reset the spindle rates.
Nov
20
comment Reducing Soreness?
Sensory fibers in the muscle spindles measure the rate of change in muscle length - to do so, they themselves have a minor amount of contraction in order to have tension to measure that difference. When you leave muscles at a resting state, these fibers will shorten to take that as the "normal" length and fire signals when the rate changes quickly. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscle_spindle#Sensitivity_modification Also note this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscle_spindle#mediaviewer/…