Reputation
1,861
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
3 7
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~54k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 132 votes cast
Mar
27
revised Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight
added 2 characters in body
Mar
27
comment Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight
Sorry - have to disagree with the thrust of this answer... IMHO, it shows a lack of understanding of the way a good kicker sets up and utilises high kicks. The variability of street fights is more reason to want to be able to kick high when the opportunity's there, not less. A committed reverse punch makes you more vulnerable than a jab too, but that's no reason to discount it. There's nothing in the question asking about karate in particular, so while the Okinawan masters are relevant expertise, there are lots of counter examples ignores, like historical use in Indochinese kickboxing.
Mar
27
answered Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight
Mar
23
comment Non-sexist equivalent of “Man up” within the dojo
"頑張れ (ganbare!) pronounced gahn-bah-ray.", except it's not - れ is pronounced "reh", much like the first part of "ready". Hear it at from a native speaker here
Mar
22
answered Non-sexist equivalent of “Man up” within the dojo
Mar
22
revised Why do teachers skip belts?
Fixed typo where I'd repeated strength twice but meant to mention flexibility.
Mar
21
answered Why do teachers skip belts?
Mar
13
answered Balance in martial arts stance
Mar
8
comment How to escape from a sankyo grip?
This question would be vastly improved if you clarified whether you are interested in escapes within the bounds of normal aikido practice, or a self defence situation: for the latter, a side or back kick into the knee is an easy option.
Feb
28
answered Is the following position realistic in any fight?
Feb
27
comment Taekwondo tornado kick defense
@DaveLiepmann thanks Dave. Re the legality of low kicks - appreciate the correction; I remembered reading something about MMA not allowing it, but turns out that's under amateur rules (here). Some interesting discussion of it here.
Feb
25
answered Taekwondo tornado kick defense
Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Jan
14
answered How a woman can teach martial art for men?
Jan
4
comment Kendo techniques
"start their sword off in a position where they must draw back" - what's that got to do with "anticipating" anything? Do you mean to say they're overly "telegraphed" by the "draw back"? Keep in mind that a dynamic "draw back" is necessary in many movements in martial arts and sports to create power. This is really obvious in some motions - try hitting a golf ball if you start with the club held statically at what ought to be the top of your backswing and you'll get dramatically reduced impact. Google "plyometrics" for some of the sports science behind why a dynamic draw back helps.
Dec
15
comment What Defines Something As A Martial Art?
"I personally dont see sparring as a competition rather its a preparation, training or simulation tool in preparation for a competition." - or in a martial art, sparring and/or competitions can both be preparations for fighting. Not in the sense of a fight being necessarily foreseen, but in the sense of being prepared for the possibility....
Dec
15
comment What Defines Something As A Martial Art?
@Wigwam: given "martial" means anything "relating to fighting or war" (Oxford dictionary), and "art" means "skill at doing a specified thing, typically one acquired through practice", things like practising a military tune on your trumpet would qualify as a "martial art". Clearly the term's taken on a massively more specialised meaning independent of the component words.
Dec
13
comment What Defines Something As A Martial Art?
It's a mistake to take the English words "martial" and "art" and think you can reason about what martial arts are or aren't on that basis. As a two-word term "martial art" is the standard way in English to refer to a whole set of practices, many from other cultures and with their own terms for which the literal translations are quite different. We used "martial arts" as a crude label for many practices - we can't then try to disqualify some of those practices from the label we creates for them on the basis of the literal meaning of our label.
Dec
13
comment What Defines Something As A Martial Art?
To say "we're brained washed to believe in martial arts from the perspective of... self-defense", and that they're really about the performance of violence, is laughably wrong. Many martial arts have techniques specifically for controlling an opponent without hurting them, and many more have philosophies they take seriously about minimising violence by e.g. defending so well the attacker realises they're out-classed, or showing the ability to injure without actually doing so as a form of deterrent. Some aikido styles focus exclusively on control, teaching no techniques to initiate attacks.
Dec
10
answered How to deal with a substantially shorter opponent?