7,440 reputation
11755
bio website
location Jupiter, FL
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Aug 6 at 0:44

I'm a web developer, IT consultant, and programmer with a property management firm in Orange County, CA. I also teach and train in Bujinkan Ninpo Taijutsu.

A lot of my side-projects end up rolling into my work life, and feel that the experience I've gained with web development, Ruby, Qt, C/C++, Java, etc. may actually be of use to somebody.

I've recently joined the Martial Arts private beta, and will be answering questions on there with regularity.

Oh, and I really hate when people tell me, "No, it can't be done." You're wrong; It can, it should, it will, so shut up and watch me.

Nothing is true; everything is permissible.
- Hassan-i Sabbah
(حسن الصباح‎)
Ruler of Alamut, Founder of the Hashshashin.


Oct
23
comment Teaching Students to See the “Big Picture” of a Conflict
You're right, it is reductio ad absurdum. Again, however, even in this, you illustrate my premise: your inattention caused you to bump the guy's beer, not your leaving the house. Statistically, the likelihood of violence is higher in the corner pub in a blue collar neighborhood than in a restaurant bar in an affluent neighborhood. If you're a sloppy person, you've created the situation. If you have a moment of care and attention, recognizing the causality of your actions, you avoid the trigger. A person getting into their car is not the trigger for an accident, but focusing on a text may be.
Oct
17
comment Teaching Students to See the “Big Picture” of a Conflict
False premise; it relies on the presupposition that leaving the house means being attacked (Barring Albanian Gjakmarrja under Kanuni i Lekë Dukagjinit). However, it could be argued that events outside an individuals control (Aggressor is laid off from their job) could put them in the wrong place at the wrong time. In the case of the belligerent, we can argue, though, that avoiding street bars (as opposed to the bar in a hotel or restaurant in which the decorum differs) decreases the likelihood of belligerents, and attention to ones surroundings would prevent spilling beer.
Oct
17
comment Teaching Students to See the “Big Picture” of a Conflict
I'm ultimately not of the mind that I can teach everyone the means to prevent their own conflicts, but rather a means to understand how their actions can put them into those situations. While chaos theory may have it that everything is continuously pushed toward a yet greater state of entropy, it would seem that still the means that bring us to chaos are far more organized in retrospect. Can then an understanding of how A indicates B teach us the means of preventing escalating chaos at least on this small scale? Why bother: Why do we bother teaching martial arts? Increasing odds. Good answer
Oct
17
comment Teaching Students to See the “Big Picture” of a Conflict
Unfortunately, I feel like you hit home on what we already teach, but think that you're telling me about the why... There's no why here: crime exists, conflict exists, therefore we train to protect ourselves from it when it touches us. The point I'm trying to teach is to show them how the choices they make land them in the situations long before it becomes evidently dangerous.
Oct
15
comment Training supplement to Muay Thai
If you internalize one lesson a week, allow it to change how you behave, how you move, and how you interact with the world, one lesson is all you need. If you take three lessons, but do not internalize them, do not move your life with them, then you will exhaust yourself and fail. Your work is to find your work, and having found it, give your life to it.
Oct
15
comment Training supplement to Muay Thai
It's arbitrary to say that training three times a week is the minimum for satisfactory progress. Satisfactory itself is an arbitrary estimation. When it comes down to training, it's not how often you train, but how perfectly you train with the time you have.
Oct
15
comment Self-defense against chainsaw attack
Sure, a brick can be thrown. It also can be unwieldy, and therefore miss the intended target. There's nothing to this answer that offers the least bit of rational explanation making "throwing a brick" a decent self-defense strategy.
Oct
14
comment Drills for training agility - cross art
Then you're perfectly equipped. Have at it. :)
Oct
14
comment Drills for training agility - cross art
Consider a seminar with a dance instructor to introduce fundamental exercises and techniques of ballet, which will improve dynamic balance, static balance, and footwork.
Oct
14
comment What is a good push-up routine to build punch strength?
Strength is a flawed concept; a catch-all and inexact term that defines a particular muscle groups capability to produce work. The correlation between an arms capability to produce work and the overall power behind a punch for an average man reduces down to single-digit percentages. Relying on strength alone puts your 4.8% (assuming you're average) against an adept trainee's 80% using the majority of body mass. Maintaining overall fitness is good, but there are better total-body exercises (swimming and gymnastics, for instance) that can improve application better than pushups.
Oct
3
comment Switching to non dominant side stance
Corollary: Use of the non-dominant hand is always at the expense of your dominant hand. Using your non-dominant hand for everyday tasks will deprive your normal motor skills of their reliability.
Oct
2
comment Switching to non dominant side stance
Reread my comment.
Oct
2
comment Switching to non dominant side stance
You seem to answer your own question: practice. How does one gain the most from practice? Practicing perfectly – performing the action with precision repeatedly. Start slow then as the action becomes reliable, build speed. Due to lacking muscles in non-dominant arms, the curve for adaptation is long. Be patient.
Sep
26
comment How do I keep a safe distance from potential threats without escalating the situation?
For those answers, I'll refer you to: martialarts.stackexchange.com/a/172/25 martialarts.stackexchange.com/a/243/25 They may not seem related, but since what you're talking about now is a stimulus reaction, which is no different than a flinch reaction. You need to condition yourself to think in a new way, much the way you've conditioned yourself to react as you are now. We are conditioned beings: we are conditioned to shake hands like some Mithraic cult upon meeting new people, for instance. Learning a new way of behaving is simply conditioning.
Sep
23
comment Aikido jo-staff origins
It is likely that much of O-sensei's training and inspiration in came from his close personal relationship with Nakayama Hakudō (中山博道), who held menkyō in Shintō Musō-ryū (among others). It's important to remember that while Ueshiba Morihei introduced into the art, it was largely codified into a specific skill set by Saitō Morihiro, who first published the techniques in 1973. The is not representative of anything other than a staff; specifically of a common length of walking stick used by itinerant monks and common travelers.
Sep
18
comment Supplementary Asian arts for Modern Medieval Armored Combat
I suggest splitting the question into multiple parts, asking each separately and specifically, so you can get a better answer. For instance, "What Asian martial arts would readily lend themselves to use in gothic plate?" would be a good start, as it could be answered demonstrably with specificity. As it is, arguably the answer is "any and all asian martial arts" barring evidence to the contrary (That somebody, somewhere, has attempted it). Judo does not itself take into account changes in balance caused by the additional weight of full armor, though it could be adapted (so too could any).
Sep
18
comment Counting Calories when Training for TKD Tournament
I used to agree whole-heartedly with this. Rather than add another answer, I'll point out two things from my wonderful doctor. 1st: your body needs about 1500 calories in food a day to maintain your organs. If you're not taking in enough calories to maintain, the first signs are usually hair loss and loosening of teeth. 2nd: Eating animal proteins every day can increase purines, leading to gout. Purines are found in numerous sources, but are heavily tied to people with high protein low carb diets. Not sure if it's important to anyone, but take it for what it's worth.
Sep
18
comment Supplementary Asian arts for Modern Medieval Armored Combat
Unfortunately, this becomes an extremely broad question; the Japanese, for instance, acknowledged that variations in armor affected mobility, differentiating the arts of jujutsu and yoroi kumiuchi. Everything is the same, but everything too is different. Technique can be adapted, but you must understand how your mobility is affected. This means range of motion in the arms, legs, hips, shoulders, and feet of both you and your opponent.
Sep
17
comment Supplementary Asian arts for Modern Medieval Armored Combat
What kind of armor are you talking about? Some armors (particularly heavier plate armors) limit mobility in specific ways.
Sep
15
comment Were ninja still active during WW2?
@JuannStrauss Kuji Kiri is a "thing". It's a ritual related to Shingon Mikkyo. And pretty much everything you've said is wildly inaccurate.