1,672 reputation
615
bio website bloritsch.d-haven.net
location Washington, DC
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Sep 18 at 11:11

Been doing martial arts since about 2000, more specifically karate. I did spend about 4 months with Nakamura Ryu Battou Do. Unfortunately, due to schedule and family constraints I couldn't keep up with the Battou Do.

The form of karate I study doesn't have a formal system name. It grew up along side Tae Kwan Do and Tang Soo Do in Korea, but it also borrows elements of jujitsu and Okinawan goju ryu. We also incorporate a couple strikes and blocks from kung fu. It's an art that doesn't specialize in any one thing, and instead provides enough from multiple disciplines to use techniques unfamiliar to our adversary. The art made it's way from Korea to America when troops came home from the Korean War (my sensei's sensei).


Feb
22
answered How to overcome fear to jump?
Feb
22
revised How do I coach her mindset to better suit karate competitions?
Further explanation of my answer in light of edits to the question.
Feb
22
comment How do I coach her mindset to better suit karate competitions?
I had a feeling we were talking around the same concept. The explanation still doesn't change my answer. Technique sparring is still an excellent way to build up confidence in the techniques--and her ability to execute them. When anger arises, it's time to stop and help her regain that confidence.
Feb
21
comment Are there legal ramifications to being a trained martial artist?
US law is further muddied by the fact that self-defense laws vary from state to state. For example, "use of lethal force" is legal in some jurisdictions and not others. In Virginia, you may use equal force to what is presented--up to and including lethal force. However, there are also clauses regarding attempting to de-escalate force.
Feb
21
comment Should I train differently to spar guys who are bigger than me?
Even though I'm a taller guy, I have an aversion to attempting to kick to the head. I'd much rather bring the head down to my foot. Since in a TKD tournament, you can't use jujitsu, strikes to the body are the best bet. Also if you do strike to the head, use your hand techniques. Judges see the strikes to the head better--but don't be a one-trick pony.
Feb
21
awarded  Editor
Feb
21
revised How do I coach her mindset to better suit karate competitions?
spelling, grammar
Feb
20
awarded  Teacher
Feb
20
comment Is practising techniques on both the left and right sides beneficial or detrimental to martial development?
Japanese sword training is taught on one side due in part that it is mounted on one side (i.e. you draw it from the same side). The other part of the reason is that it is a two handed weapon. There is little advantage to switching which hand is dominant. Single handed weapons, particularly if they are held in both hands, are taught with the expectation that you will develop both hands.
Feb
20
answered Value in Practicing Spinning Kicks
Feb
20
awarded  Supporter
Feb
20
answered How do I coach her mindset to better suit karate competitions?