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bio website shaunagordon.com
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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Aug 27 at 14:52

Jul
24
comment What are good martial arts for aging bodies?
/r/capoeira begs to differ (several didn't even start until their 40s) - reddit.com/r/capoeira/comments/158kgz/… A lot of what is generally practiced (for reasons other than showing off) is only "insane" to those who haven't learned the art, just like how many things in any other martial art are "insane" to a newbie or outsider. Also, Mestre Acordeon is over 70. If the leader(s) of your art are older than your parents, you really don't have an excuse in your age.
Mar
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
16
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
+1 for making use of all dimensions and not just left/right, front/back. Too many people forget that sometimes, your best best is to drop down onto the ground.
Jan
16
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
While things like "Tai Sabaki" and "Mae Geri" may sound fancy, they're really not, and says the exact same thing you're saying here - "he's charging where you were at...so don't be there." Sometimes, the safest place in a fight is actually a hair's breadth from your opponent.
Nov
22
awarded  Critic
Nov
8
revised What is the Most Effective Discipline to Learn for Absolute Beginners
added 637 characters in body
Nov
8
answered What is the Most Effective Discipline to Learn for Absolute Beginners
Nov
6
comment Learning not to turn your back on ground?
@Christian - Even chokes have escape methods, but yes, they are very difficult, and are often hard on the neck, ears, and/or face. That's why you have to learn to see and stop them before they're applied. And frankly, you can never do that if you're lying face-down. Not to mention that lying face down invites any number of from-behind chokes in any situation where it's fair game.
Nov
5
answered Learning not to turn your back on ground?
Oct
17
answered Teaching Students to See the “Big Picture” of a Conflict
Oct
3
comment Switching to non dominant side stance
@stslavik - That is certainly true, though I would argue that the cost to the dominant side isn't as bad as some might think, especially if one is not exclusively using the non-dominant side. People still tend to be dominant in one side or the other, so continued practice should retain the dominant side motor skills. It ultimately comes back to "use it or lose it."
Oct
2
answered Switching to non dominant side stance
Sep
13
comment Which arts use the Naginata?
@Btuman - The Bujinkan has several schools in the states, including many in the midwest. There appear to be several in the Detroit area.
Aug
30
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
21
awarded  Yearling
Mar
7
comment Are martial arts helpful in dealing with pain from a sedentary lifestyle?
+1 - If nothing else, I've found martial arts better at counteracting my desk job solely because I can stick with it without getting bored.
Sep
4
answered What are good martial arts for aging bodies?
Jul
30
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
30
comment How do I increase flexibility to achieve a full split?
@DaveLiepmann - If I had to guess, I'd say because it needs more elaboration. Otherwise, it's just kind of a non-answer (not unlike saying something along the lines of "Google it"), and one that many people would probably disagree with (in my experience, and what I've seen around here, the opinion of a lot of people is that technique often trumps raw strength in a large number of cases; why, then, should being able to squat and DL one's own bodyweight be a requirement, let alone a prerequisite?).
Jul
18
revised How does a non-grappler train to be ready to avoid grappling in a real-world situation?
added 1104 characters in body