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bio website shaunagordon.com
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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Aug 27 at 14:52

Jul
24
comment What are good martial arts for aging bodies?
/r/capoeira begs to differ (several didn't even start until their 40s) - reddit.com/r/capoeira/comments/158kgz/… A lot of what is generally practiced (for reasons other than showing off) is only "insane" to those who haven't learned the art, just like how many things in any other martial art are "insane" to a newbie or outsider. Also, Mestre Acordeon is over 70. If the leader(s) of your art are older than your parents, you really don't have an excuse in your age.
Jan
16
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
+1 for making use of all dimensions and not just left/right, front/back. Too many people forget that sometimes, your best best is to drop down onto the ground.
Jan
16
comment Self-defense against a bigger charging opponent
While things like "Tai Sabaki" and "Mae Geri" may sound fancy, they're really not, and says the exact same thing you're saying here - "he's charging where you were at...so don't be there." Sometimes, the safest place in a fight is actually a hair's breadth from your opponent.
Nov
6
comment Learning not to turn your back on ground?
@Christian - Even chokes have escape methods, but yes, they are very difficult, and are often hard on the neck, ears, and/or face. That's why you have to learn to see and stop them before they're applied. And frankly, you can never do that if you're lying face-down. Not to mention that lying face down invites any number of from-behind chokes in any situation where it's fair game.
Oct
3
comment Switching to non dominant side stance
@stslavik - That is certainly true, though I would argue that the cost to the dominant side isn't as bad as some might think, especially if one is not exclusively using the non-dominant side. People still tend to be dominant in one side or the other, so continued practice should retain the dominant side motor skills. It ultimately comes back to "use it or lose it."
Sep
13
comment Which arts use the Naginata?
@Btuman - The Bujinkan has several schools in the states, including many in the midwest. There appear to be several in the Detroit area.
Mar
7
comment Are martial arts helpful in dealing with pain from a sedentary lifestyle?
+1 - If nothing else, I've found martial arts better at counteracting my desk job solely because I can stick with it without getting bored.
Jul
30
comment How do I increase flexibility to achieve a full split?
@DaveLiepmann - If I had to guess, I'd say because it needs more elaboration. Otherwise, it's just kind of a non-answer (not unlike saying something along the lines of "Google it"), and one that many people would probably disagree with (in my experience, and what I've seen around here, the opinion of a lot of people is that technique often trumps raw strength in a large number of cases; why, then, should being able to squat and DL one's own bodyweight be a requirement, let alone a prerequisite?).
Jun
25
comment Is practising techniques on both the left and right sides beneficial or detrimental to martial development?
Re: The catch thing - you said yourself that people have issues catching with their off hand because they don't usually catch with their off hand. Train both sides and you can use both sides. It may take a while to train the off side, but it can be done. Good examples of this are bellydancers (they can flex their obliques without moving over muscles, not to mention isolating the three sections of front abdominal muscles, which is really hard to do), and jugglers (can catch with either hand).
May
1
comment Is weight training useful in martial arts?
To add to this, in my experience, weight lifting (StrongLifts, specifically) has helped me if for no other reason than learning my limits and forms for certain things. For example, learning to deadlift has helped me learn how to do a particular body slam that we do for practising/testing rear breakfalls, if for no other reason than teaching good lifting form.
Apr
10
comment How effective are different pricing structures for martial arts studios?
To add, the dojo I attend works on a "per belt" basis, which is three months per belt (or four months, for white belt). It allows for many of the advantages of both the monthly and the contract (though there is no contract), because of the slightly longer commitment (lowering attrition). Additionally, I've seen dojos charge on a monthly basis, but only allow 2 classes per week (and charge for each additional), effectively nullifying the per-class savings. So always ask about their structure and class allowances.
Mar
31
comment How important is lineage when it comes to credibility or trustworthiness?
@Dave (At the risk of getting "chatty"...) And what about the schools that teach for things like self defense and not for competition (and, in fact, may teach things that are illegal in competitions)? (On a side note, I think that could make a good question, if it can be asked in an objective manner.)
Mar
31
comment How important is lineage when it comes to credibility or trustworthiness?
@Dave - I'd be careful with the "competition record" thing. I don't know if it's the intended meaning, but it gives the connotation that a school is only good if it's used in structured competitions, which can potentially leave out the schools that don't train to compete.
Mar
26
comment Controlling my emotions during sparring
I read the linked one as using the adrenaline rush to one's advantage, while this one is asking for advice for keeping from getting frustrated. While they may seem the same, for those of us who get frustrated and turned off from an activity when we repeatedly get our ass handed to us, they are fundamentally different questions.
Mar
22
comment When should I run away?
I'm not sure if it's cyclical, either, but it is becoming enough of a "discussion" to be sent to the chat room. Even if we don't do it, a mod will.
Mar
21
comment When should I run away?
@Trevoke - That's probably where we'll have to agree to disagree. I also think you've gotten hung up on the "what are you willing to kill/die for?" to the point that you came under the impression that he feels every situation is a life or death one. Again, though, I think we'll have to agree to disagree, as that's not the message I got from it. When it comes down to it, though, it's your question to mark as you see fit.
Mar
21
comment When should I run away?
@Trevoke - Why can't you answer "what am I willing to kill/die for?" outside of a situation? The question has nothing to do with skill, but what for what you are willing to go to such extremes for. If I don't have the means/tools to kill my attacker, then it's a moot point (and it comes back to "what am I willing to die for?"), but if I do, then I've already come to terms with the very real possibility that the person in front of me will die by my hands. Killing someone, even in defense, is a heavy burden. IMO, you should know what is worth it to you before you're in a position to kill.
Mar
21
comment When should I run away?
@Trevoke - I think stslavik's point is that you should already have "what am I prepared to kill/die for?" answered long before you're even in such a situation to begin with. The answer to those questions are also going to be fairly constant, whereas "where's the exit?", "what weapons do they have?", etc are going to depend entirely on the situation at hand. What you're willing to kill or die for shouldn't be something you're deciding while you're in the middle of an altercation.
Mar
21
comment Do shin guards defeat the purpose of training?
I can't speak for the OP's school, but in mine, it's not that leg kicks are "raining down on your shins," but rather that a number of kicks connect at the kicker's shins.
Mar
21
comment What qualifies a school or business as a legitimate martial arts system?
@JPM - Keep in mind that it still costs money for things like mats (which are surprisingly expensive) and a training location, so it shouldn't be unreasonable for an instructor to ask for compensation. There is, however, a difference between charging a tuition and price gouging. When it comes to cost, the question should be (in addition to David's questions) "is this reasonable for what I'm getting?"