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Jul
20
comment What is Qi power and has it been proven to exist scientifically?
I guess I'm still not clear on how this trick relates to qi. Are you saying qi is skillful striking? I'm also still unclear on why the high-frequency vibrations, which would be dead-simple to identify with common physics equipment, haven't been found.
Jul
20
comment What is Qi power and has it been proven to exist scientifically?
A "a high-frequency vibration controlled by the mind and integrated by mind/body coordination into an ultra-fast wave-like unit" is an easily tested phenomenon. It's also not clear to me at all how breaking sugar canes balanced on eggs, or breaking the bottom of two bricks, demonstrates anything qi-like instead of a regular physical phenomenon.
Jul
20
comment What is Qi power and has it been proven to exist scientifically?
I'm not sure if it's best to completely replace this answer with a different one...it might be better to revert this answer and just add a new one separately.
Jul
18
answered Will training in boxing affect my karate skills?
Jul
16
comment What is Qi power and has it been proven to exist scientifically?
I hear you on the last 3 comments, but that approach raises a problem when the word distracts people. For instance, the supernatural connotations of the word 'qi' both A) attracts disproportionate attention compared to the (amazing) strength feats of Olympic lifters, gymnasts, and combat athletes (which require just as much dedication and have just as much relevance to MA) and B) often leads people away from the hard training that would lead to accomplishing impressive martial feats. Using the word 'qi' turns into a misleading advertising tactic instead of a useful descriptor.
Jul
15
comment What is Qi power and has it been proven to exist scientifically?
Whether someone "believes in qi" depends whether "qi" in that instance means something akin to "heavy hands" in boxing (or "power" in wrestling), or something more like "magic" in Penn & Teller's routine. Nobody can perform sleight-of-hand "magic" unless they've trained "magic", but that doesn't mean there's something "there". This is exactly analogous to performing feats like 'needle thru glass' or 'unbendable arm', which can be explained reasonably as physical phenomena that we refer to with the acknowledged-as-vague term 'qi' or ridiculously as supernatural powers that we call 'qi'.
Jul
15
comment What is Qi power and has it been proven to exist scientifically?
I agree with everything in the beginning about "qi" being an amorphous description like "love"...but then you propose a bunch of tests and drills, which you say demonstrate something "there". That doesn't make any sense! Either we're talking about a vague term like, for instance, "heavy hands" in boxing (which refers to a grab bag of elements like timing, hip power, efficiency, and whole-body coordination), or we're talking about a specific kind of force or thing. When you ask "is qi effective for fighting" then only the latter ridiculous definition makes sense.
Jul
13
revised More dirty tricks in Ju Jitsu compared to other martial arts?
"jutsu" not "-itsu"
Jul
13
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
"You won't find anything unambiguously uniquely Brazilian Jujitsu in a hold or a joint manipulation until you take some time in that art either." What? "that's not unambiguous, because it's actually 1 foot in front of me" What? The analogy to math is even more ludicrous: math is the name for the principles and relationships and methods you describe, for which we have no alternative explanations. The kid didn't use intuition, they used math. In contrast, examples of qi always have alternative explanations.
Jul
10
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
What part of "what you can expect" is qi? It all sounds like what I'd expect from working at any physical challenge over time. Are you defining qi as the feeling of relaxation when one is standing properly?
Jul
10
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
@mattm Regarding visualization: lots of people not otherwise considered to be mentally ill convince themselves that they feel demons inside them, or that they feel magic flowing through their arms, or that they're experiencing past lives. Relying on self-produced feelings to prove or define something is not exactly sturdy ground.
Jul
10
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
What are these "real", "unexpected, and unambiguous feelings that arise over sustained practice"? Obviously some feeling will occur while doing anything 30 minutes a day for 100 days, so how do we distinguish the qi feeling from the non-qi feeling? Or does literally anything resulting from this practice qualify as a qi feeling?
Jul
10
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
+1 This is a straightforward challenge that I'd like people who believe in qi to answer. Those answers promise to be deeply informative.
Jul
8
comment Do shin guards defeat the purpose of training?
The two references to MMA confuse me. In-house sparring isn't MMA competition even in (most) MMA schools. And why would training MMA instead of "ninjutsu" make the question moot?
Jul
4
reviewed Approve Breakfalls in competition
Jul
4
comment Should my body type influence my choice of martial art to learn?
Judo competitions are divided by rank: generally they use one for below brown, one for brown, one for black.
Jul
2
revised Does judo work against someone not wearing a judogi?
added 122 characters in body
Jul
2
revised Does judo work against someone not wearing a judogi?
judogi not judoga
Jul
2
revised What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
added 59 characters in body
Jun
30
answered Should my body type influence my choice of martial art to learn?