Reputation
17,015
Next tag badge:
300/400 score
51/80 answers
Badges
36 79
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~569k people reached

Jan
7
reviewed Approve How to defend yourself when you are outclassed?
Jan
6
answered Are there viable ways to simulate the body reactions to a punch landed to the face?
Jan
6
answered What's the difference between Internal and External martial arts?
Jan
6
answered How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
Jan
6
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
That's why I quoted you, and then asked two questions. The first corresponds to your point 1. The second corresponds to your point 2.
Jan
6
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
That doesn't test the technique in question. A test for the technique in question would be to chop someone like me in the neck. I'd prefer to wear a mouthpiece and be allowed to defend myself. This is my point: you have no basis of knowledge for the statement I quoted in my first comment.
Jan
6
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
I didn't say it was a concussion, but you're right that we wouldn't see a fencing response in a choke-out as opposed to a KO. But the point remains that he did a forward roll instead of falling over unconscious like someone choked out, which leads me to ask: if you admit he's not rendered unconscious, then what is the effect of the technique?
Jan
6
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
It's a forward roll. Which unconscious people tend not to do.
Jan
6
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
I assume you mean the knockout at 1:00. Honestly it looks fishy to me in two ways: 1) uke does a break fall while supposedly unconscious, and doesn't exhibit any of the telltale behaviors of a person knocked out (e.g. stiffness, fencing response), suggesting he may actually just be falling for his teacher. 2) Hitting a defenseless opponent tells us nothing about my question, which is implementation against a live, resisting opponent in a chaotic situation. The example at 1:35 is not much better. This is fakery and tomfoolery.
Jan
6
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
"A strike [to a valve of the carotid artery on the neck] will cause unconsiousness." How do you know this? How reliable is this effect in live implementation?
Jan
6
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
I updated the epistemic viciousness PDF link. gilliankrussell.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/… Judoinfo may be temporarily down; not sure.
Jan
6
revised How can one practice spear-hand strikes, while still knowing you got the technique right?
added 14 characters in body
Jan
6
comment How can you properly learn techniques which are too dangerous to ever apply?
See related question here: martialarts.stackexchange.com/q/501/347
Jan
5
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
3
answered Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
Jan
3
revised Why is using wristlock throws so frowned upon in BJJ even though they are not illegal?
edited title
Dec
30
comment Video evidence of Aikido applied against a resisting non-aikidoka?
@StevenGubkin I find it useful to A) distinguish Aikido (or any other style) from wristlocks), and B) remember that wristlocks work, but they (and other standing jointlocks) have their own specific impediments to effective training. I actually really like wristlocks and waki-gatame armlocks.
Dec
28
comment Does weight and muscle power really impact punch power and kick?
See martialarts.stackexchange.com/a/4425/347 or martialarts.stackexchange.com/a/4451/347
Dec
28
comment Does weight and muscle power really impact punch power and kick?
-1 for equating weight training with mass training and eschewing speed training.
Dec
22
comment What are effective self-defense martial arts for smaller woman
@zero Consider knee on belly, the top position I was thinking of—that's no more vulnerable to a soccer kick than a boxing stance. Consider that training BJJ allows one to get out from under an attacker so that his friend can't stomp me in the head. Consider that BJJ has always had and continues to have stand-up techniques as "official" parts of the art—hip throws, headlock counters, punch defenses, distance management. These are part of the Alliance basic curriculum and the original Gracie tapes. How are you not getting this?