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Apr
26
comment Is there a statistical correlation between deaths in the ring and having one's father in the corner as one's trainer?
This is the most comprehensive I am aware of: ejmas.com/jcs/velazquez/index.html
Apr
25
comment Is there a statistical correlation between deaths in the ring and having one's father in the corner as one's trainer?
I doubt the statistical power here.
Apr
16
comment What is exactly a cross face position in BJJ?
I've never received a direct explanation but my understanding is that it refers to any position where you force the person's head to turn, such as with your shoulder (Shoulder of Justice in side control) or your forearm (e.g. during a rear naked choke)
Apr
14
comment What does it mean to be rooted, and how is being rooted different from being balanced?
For context, various answers here assert a relationship between balance and rootedness.
Apr
14
comment What does it mean to be rooted, and how is being rooted different from being balanced?
So, balance with base.
Apr
12
comment Systema: “Beyond the physical” force generation
It might interest you to consider that literally everything that exists is physical. That's the criteria for physical phenomena: that it occurs. To ask "how can I generate force through other than physical means" is literally nonsensical. It's an incoherent thought. No answer can be correct because the question is beyond incorrect; it's so misguided that it's not even wrong.
Apr
11
comment Training to avoid freezing up in self-defense
WTF?! Pick fights with drug dealers while wearing a hat and contact lenses, then hail a cab for your getaway? As training? That's not only stupid, it's wrong.
Mar
24
comment Benefits of women only sessions
@bluehallu In the context of martial arts, that's precisely what women-only classes do: new students come to the women-only classes...then transition at least partially to the general-population classes. The women-only classes remain as a feeder program and as a way to get in training that lessens injury risk. This is all addressed in my answer, above.
Mar
24
comment Benefits of women only sessions
@bluehallu That's a weaksauce analogy. The foundation of your argument is that women shouldn't feel threatened by men, or that such a feeling is invalid. When you get groped or called a "slut" in class then go ahead and ask your instructor for a you-only class.
Mar
24
comment Benefits of women only sessions
@Sardathrion Last sentence was a typo, thanks. As for women in your club, different women feel differently. Both a person's personality the physical circumstances, and the school culture play a part. In hard-sparring schools, I expect the physical circumstances tend to play a bigger role in many women's opinion on the subject: if most of class is compliant drilling or sparring is light-contact, size differentials matter less for this issue than if every class involves 30 minutes of full-contact randori.
Mar
24
comment Benefits of women only sessions
@bluehallu If those men legitimately felt safer and more comfortable, then I would be swayed. But that doesn't seem to be the case. Just blindly flipping the genders ignores facts like physiology and culture—women tend to be smaller and have less sports experience. If 90% of martial arts schools were women-only then my opinion would swing back the other way. But they're not.
Mar
24
comment Non-sexist equivalent of “Man up” within the dojo
@BarryTheHatchet Independent of intended meaning, the words used to communicate that meaning have their own gender signifiers and cultural connotations. I acknowledge that the OP perhaps didn't intend to be sexist, but to say that their interlocutor cannot interpret sexism into that phrase, or that "there's no sexist undertone" to a phrase that, again, explicitly invokes maleness as a paragon of toughness is ludicrous. I am in fact being quite subtle when I declare that to say this phrase is devoid of gender connotation is factually wrong.
Mar
22
comment Non-sexist equivalent of “Man up” within the dojo
Your prescriptivist approach is wrong and you should feel bad. The vast majority of people saying "man up" (as well as the vast majority of people hearing them say it) intend for it to mean "act like an adult male by being tougher". They intend to communicate a (mildly) sexist comment and are succeeding in doing so. Your linguistic-historical handwaving is hyperpedantic and irrelevant.
Mar
22
comment Does your gender effect your competitive potential?
"I have never come across explicit sexism / gender issues in my experiences with Judo" -- this may be influenced by the fact that you're male and therefore wouldn't be on the receiving end of misogyny, or that you don't consider sexist comments to be sexist.
Mar
22
comment Do any martial arts have mixed gender competitions?
An exhibition match means it doesn't go on your record, and it's not for competition but to demonstrate. In terms of research and outcomes, you're going to have to be more precise about what you mean.
Mar
22
comment Does your gender effect your competitive potential?
@Nathan Now I'm even more confused than before.
Mar
22
comment Does your gender effect your competitive potential?
It's not clear to me how the first three paragraphs relate to the last, nor how the extremely vague title relates to the question. Are you asking if sports performance is differentiated by sex?
Mar
22
comment Non-sexist equivalent of “Man up” within the dojo
You can't just wave your hands and declare that there's "no sexism involved" in your speech when your speech makes a direct equivalence between maleness and toughness. You can be okay with saying such a thing, but to say it's devoid of gender connotation is factually wrong.
Mar
9
comment What are the purposes of martial arts forms?
Very interesting last full paragraph.
Mar
7
comment Where can I find statistics on attack modalities?
None of us have high-quality data to answer this question even for the modern USA, much less for mid-19th-century China. We do have qualitative historical reports that venture specific variations, e.g. the importance of wrist grabs in feudal Japan, but otherwise no.