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May
14
comment Can Forms (Kata/Poomsae/etc.) or Techniques (Waza) be practiced on the ground?
@stslavik About "going back"--that's why I recommended getting substantial experience before playing with kata-on-the-back. In my experience most people advocating "do kata from your back" can't grapple and are looking for ways to avoid the hard work of learning to grapple, or feigning expertise in an art they're unfamiliar with by drawing weak parallels. I'm not saying that's the case with you, but I think it's important to keep in mind when giving advice.
May
11
comment What is the oldest documented Eastern Martial Art that is still practiced?
Awesome answer. I look forward to reading the sources you reference. Thanks! :)
May
8
comment Training while exhausted
For a specific example of a "training while exhausted" recommendation, see this answer from Sardathrion, which inspired this question. It is a classic example, in that the method is recommended as a way to reduce tension in movements. This has been shown to be a poor approach. In particular, one of the hallmarks of well-mastered technique is the absence of unnecessary tension, ergo using the "train while exhausted" technique to reduce tension is by definition misguided.
May
8
comment Did Karate really originate in the Okinawa region of Japan?
@stslavik "Many people incorrectly credit Gichin Funakoshi as the first to write "karate" using ["open hand" kanji]. However, in 1922, his first book, "Ryukyu Kenpo Tode" used the characters 1 and 3 (Chinese hand). There is also evidence that the first black belt certificates Funakoshi gave out in 1924 used the 'toude' characters as well." "When was this formal change in meaning and kanji made? The earliest known document is Chomo Hanashiro's "Karate Kumite," first published in August 1905" according to a former instructor of mine: fightingarts.com/reading/article.php?id=197
May
8
comment Training while exhausted
@stslavik I've seen "train while exhausted" advised at every stage of training both in person and online, by crap teachers and by well-respected ones, so the answer to your first question is Yes. The bar for a "well-mastered" technique is quite high and rarely reached when "train while exhausted" is employed. As for the crossfit reference, it's not a non-sequitor to point out the tendency in both fitness and martial arts to emphasize feeling how hard a workout was versus using a workout as a means towards a goal. If you think rephrasing it could help, please go ahead.
May
7
comment What are good exercises for building grip strength for judo and BJJ?
-1 buying a wrist roller before a barbell is morally wrong.
May
7
comment What are the possible signs some has lost consciousness when being choked?
+1 better answer than mine.
May
3
comment What material should be covered in a rape-defense course?
Not at all; I think the length made it possible to say things like "walk in pairs" without being reductionist about the problem.
May
3
comment What material should be covered in a rape-defense course?
Thanks for the IRMA, I wasn't aware of a codified version. Great answer. False empowerment is dangerous.
May
2
comment What is the best bo staff for an 8-year-old for competitions?
We're just going to have to disagree on that. Cheers.
May
1
comment How effective are foul techniques as a side control escape?
Related: "if you cannot fight "clean" you have no business fighting "dirty"" from MAP
Apr
30
comment Stretches for kicking?
If it happened during teeps, maybe your hip flexor was tired, and it wasn't about flexibility. If it was during round kicks, then it was almost certainly a lack of sideways flexibility. If it's just a stretchy problem and not pain, then keep training for a few months and see what happens. To get more answers here, you'll need to edit the question to include a lot more detail about the location of the pain, type of kicks, and background on previous training and flexibility benchmarks.
Apr
30
comment Stretches for kicking?
Also, which kicks? Teep, round?
Apr
29
comment Who was the first female judoka?
Doctor Liepmann? That's my father! :)
Apr
29
comment What is a “heavy jab”?
A stretch reflex can be used in some punching techniques to add power, much like a wind-up. So yes, while neither of us was taking this class and I have no idea what he was trying to teach, backwards movement isn't bonkers in 100% of situations. Have you worked with this instructor? Does he have a fight record? Have you ever taken a muay thai class with him or someone else? Did you ask whether that movement was exaggerated for effect?
Apr
29
comment Which disciplines involve smacking away opponents' strikes?
My suspicion is that Bruce Lee most likely studied parries in wing chun, boxing, and karate (in order of his interest), and I don't believe any of those arts got their parries from weapons work.
Apr
29
comment Which disciplines involve smacking away opponents' strikes?
@Kristian82 It's also the newest, meaning it has the fewest opportunities for people to upvote it.
Apr
29
comment What is a “heavy jab”?
Perhaps this was a pedagogical trick to emphasize movement in the shoulder during regular jabs, and not a separate kind of punch in itself?
Apr
19
comment How effective are foul techniques as a side control escape?
My question was originally triggered by surprise (in another question) about how many people seem to think biting and so on work as some automatic, easy escape, or elicit a predictable and desirable response. Your answer addresses these points well. I wouldn't say that legal and illegal moves require "equal" training, but that's quibbling.
Apr
19
comment How effective are foul techniques as a side control escape?
@Trevoke I upvoted it, and currently it's the best, but I wanted to sustain the suspense so more people would answer :D