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Nov
19
comment Arm bar crushes the groin
@TimothyAWiseman They're against the rules in judo and IBJJF BJJ. NAGA apparently allows it but they're kind of the Wild West. My point with 4 is to short-circuit potential white belt complaints about elbows in the groin. I try to avoid ball crushage but A) there's a bit that just happens and B) not all pain due to inexact armbars is actually the testicles, but just the fact that it's an elbow and elbows are uncomfortable just about anywhere they're jamming into you.
Nov
17
comment Arm bar crushes the groin
@TopinFrassi I believe you. But the point is to develop the ability. Toughness is both a mental skill and a physical comfort with the uncomfortable position.
Nov
12
comment kicked in the sternum - tips on healing, time frame? any lingering danger?
@Sardathrion You're being uncharitable. Training produces all sorts of weird injuries that are new to people but that don't necessitate a doctor's visit—which, let's remember, costs time, money, and emotional energy. Asking one's peers (who are more experienced in these cultural practices) what to do about a small potentially-nothing, potentially-serious injury is the most normal response. If I went to a doc for every injury like this I would never get any work done and my doc would brand me a paranoid hypochondriac.
Nov
6
comment Training on hard ground
@SebastienFERRAND That has little to do with how hard the floor is. The texture of the floor—rough or smooth—is relevant. Were you training enough to get acclimated to training?
Nov
6
comment Training on hard ground
What were the foot injuries?
Nov
4
comment What is this name of this kind of joint lock
The gif makes me sure that this is a movie version of the chicken wing and related locks I mention. The point is to prevent the shoulder from moving forward in space while moving the wrist and elbow upward towards the back of the shoulder.
Nov
2
comment What is the most effective way to teach Jiu Jitsu
5-7 is a lot of moves per class just about any way you slice it.
Oct
23
comment Best Martial Arts For Home Training
@YoustayIgo You "harden" your body through strength and conditioning training, like at a gym with barbells and kettlebells. The other option is to spar as in boxing or judo.
Oct
23
comment Best Martial Arts For Home Training
I stand by what I said: you have no clue what judo is, and you haven't practiced martial arts. Try taking a road trip to a judo or boxing club to actually experience these things at least once before acting like you have an educated opinion.
Oct
23
comment Best Martial Arts For Home Training
"There is no skill to [be] encountered here in an opponent. There is just brute force ... and lots of it." -> Yeah, right. Lots of people are naturally athletic, and that means more than just brute force. Some people instinctively move better. You're caricaturing your bullies.
Oct
23
comment Best Martial Arts For Home Training
@YoustayIgo You seem to have a lot of ideas about how a lot of martial arts work, without ever having actually done any. I can understand someone with experience in one art forming an opinion on a similar one, but from your comments I'm confused as to what you think judo is.
Oct
20
comment How do I improve my attack speed?
My point is that bodybuilding (lifting to produce muscle size to look good) is not the same as weightlifting (lifting to increase strength and power).
Oct
20
comment How do I improve my attack speed?
What sport is this where gaining 10kg of muscle made someone easier to submit? Did this person stop training the sport in favor of lifting?
Oct
20
comment How do I improve my attack speed?
I agree that excessive bodybuilding can cause trouble, but weightlifting doesn't cause inflexibility. Quite the opposite.
Oct
19
comment How do I improve my attack speed?
Sigh. It's always depressing to hear "watch out! You might get too muscular!" as if it's something that happens easily. Plenty of very, very muscular people are very, very fast and very, very flexible.
Oct
16
comment What martial arts resources discuss biomechanics of maximizing efficient force generation?
I'm dubious of any discussion of martial arts that hinges on physics, because the intersection of the two sets "I respect their physics knowledge" and "I respect their martial arts knowledge/ability" is quite small, before we even get into questions of complexity and appropriate application of biomechanics/physics to MA...but I've heard Fight Like a Physicist is OK.
Oct
15
comment Is 16 too late of an age to start hapkido or judo?
"my art is Tang Soo Do, but my master likes to incorporate many different things in the advanced classes and I get to play with judo throws and jiu-jitsu style grappling" — as someone who used to do exactly this (in karate instead of TSD), take my word on it: this is not even remotely the same thing as experiencing these things in a judo or BJJ school.
Oct
14
comment How do I train the basics of martial conditioning and strength?
Excellent! Glad to hear it. Your situation is fairly common and I'm happy to point you to a productive path. Cheers.
Oct
13
comment How do I train the basics of martial conditioning and strength?
The canonical answer is to do fundamental strength, conditioning, and mobility, as described here. You say you want the highest physical potential. That means forget purely calisthenic training and do some combination of calisthenics, powerlifting, Oly lifting, track, and gymnastics. See also this answer. There's also an example of tailoring S&C to prepare for a specific martial art in the absence of that art.
Oct
2
comment What can I practice to remove tension from my movements
Have you actually found lifting weights to be a problem in your own practice, or is this just something you've been told? I and others I know have found that proper weight lifting practice has helped a lot in achieving proper relaxed techniques.