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Nov
14
comment Can there be too much training?
Many successful competitors train daily, even twice a day. I, like many casual amateurs, train multiple days in a row with no ill effect.
Nov
14
comment How to safely harden the inner thigh
Side kicks? Or round kicks?
Nov
13
comment Yang tai chi breathing (when to inhale/exhale)
@Tominator Fair enough. There is a fair degree of "in this class we do it this way" in any forms practice, however.
Nov
13
comment What are the advantages of using a vertical fist for punching?
Please use paragraphs and format your posts legibly.
Nov
12
comment Can I be bulky and fast at the same time?
@Sardathrion Best practice is to then edit the question.
Nov
12
comment Can I be bulky and fast at the same time?
@cameron Punching power is developed with technique plus general power training such as the Olympic lifts like the power snatch, power clean, and push press. I'm not sure what you're asking gymnastic training. I mean, yeah, gymnastics is great, but it won't make you very big except in the shoulders, lats, and upper arms. (Which are great places to be big.)
Nov
12
comment Can I be bulky and fast at the same time?
Downvoters and close-voters: the best approach to a mediocre question is to improve it, not take it as an opportunity to show the person asking that they did it wrong. There's a valid question here, and it's not opinion-based.
Nov
12
comment Why don't some gyms focus on take downs?
It's not a duplicate, but this question may help describe the situation.
Nov
12
comment Can I be bulky and fast at the same time?
Have you ever watched American football, or heavyweight Olympic lifting? It's absolutely possible to be simultaneousl big, strong, fast, and flexible.
Nov
11
comment What are the advantages of using a vertical fist for punching?
But wouldn't all these attributes of the vertical punch also apply to a horizontal punch?
Nov
11
comment What is a good defense against a rear naked choke?
Honestly this is a fair amount of detail.
Nov
7
comment What is the Most Effective Discipline to Learn for Absolute Beginners
So glove up, show them the basics of boxing, wrestling, a proper stand, a little guard work, and make it fun. Have them hit the pads, escape mount a few times, show them where a wrist grab is weak.
Oct
29
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
@Btuman See the Neil Ohlenkamp link I posted above, or this answer. I am convinced of the evidence that allocating the majority of one's training towards becoming an athlete and sparring with as many sparring-safe techniques as possible is superior to not sparring or sparring with highly restrictive rulesets (e.g. only light or slow sparring) and not becoming an athlete.
Oct
28
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
@stslavik I didn't mean rephrasing this question, I meant rephrasing this whole instructor-versus-style discussion. As for 99% of BJJ being competition, the idea that BJJ practitioners don't know how to lift the hips to break the elbow is...interesting...perhaps you should investigate Rener Gracie, or any of the many BJJ-for-MMA instructors?
Oct
28
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
@stslavik Is there a way to phrase this "it's all the instructor" that could turn this into a question for a more robust elucidation of the topic?
Oct
28
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
@stslavik The "it's all about the instructor" argument, while technically true, is almost entirely useless. Styles have tendencies. 99% of Bujinkan schools don't train or spar full contact the way 99% of competitive boxing schools do. It beggars belief to say that an aikido school is remotely similar to an MMA school when it comes to sparring: literally one in a thousand aikido schools wrestles or spars the way nearly every BJJ school does.
Oct
27
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
And of course non-competitive doesn't necessarily mean no sparring, but it often does, and even when it doesn't, the sparring in non-competitive arts is usually less (not more) oriented towards self-defense. (Fewer techniques, less contact, fewer ranges of combat.) There are always exceptions, but if I train competitive boxing I'm pretty sure I'm going to get good at punching people, taking punches, and not getting punched. I can't say that for the average, say, wing chun school, where they might drill eye pokes (slowly) but which probably doesn't spar beyond chi sao.
Oct
27
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
It might be a little more street-y to add a chin-push or palm strike to osotogari, but the competition judoka specializing in osotogari without the chin push is going to execute that move faster, harder, with more balance and control, and more effectively in a self-defense scenario than the "street-oriented" martial artist who practices the chin push version--and even spars!--but doesn't compete or use the chin push in sparring. (Neil Ohlenkamp writes about this eloquently.)
Oct
27
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
@Dungarth First, there's a good full-fledged question in your comments here, but I don't know what it is. :) Second, over-optimization to a sport ruleset is always a factor, but as I said in the answer, the reason combat sports repeatedly produce better fighters is that they produce athletes who are well-trained in actually executing techniques on fully resisting opponents who are trying to do the same to them.
Oct
26
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
@Dungarth Sure. It's uncommon, though, and leaves the many benefits of organized competition. But I'm not sure what you have in mind.