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Oct
27
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
It might be a little more street-y to add a chin-push or palm strike to osotogari, but the competition judoka specializing in osotogari without the chin push is going to execute that move faster, harder, with more balance and control, and more effectively in a self-defense scenario than the "street-oriented" martial artist who practices the chin push version--and even spars!--but doesn't compete or use the chin push in sparring. (Neil Ohlenkamp writes about this eloquently.)
Oct
27
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
@Dungarth First, there's a good full-fledged question in your comments here, but I don't know what it is. :) Second, over-optimization to a sport ruleset is always a factor, but as I said in the answer, the reason combat sports repeatedly produce better fighters is that they produce athletes who are well-trained in actually executing techniques on fully resisting opponents who are trying to do the same to them.
Oct
26
comment What is the most effective martial art in a street fight - no weapons?
@Dungarth Sure. It's uncommon, though, and leaves the many benefits of organized competition. But I'm not sure what you have in mind.
Oct
19
comment Why do taekwondoists bounce so much? (And how do we help them stop?)
This round-table of muay Thai fighters discussing their views of TKD is somewhat relevant.
Oct
16
comment Training supplement to Muay Thai
I, too, have found that three times a week is the minimum for satisfactory athletic progress in a combat sport. My judo coach agrees, saying that 2 times a week merely maintains. One lesson a week is really, really, really not helpful to getting better at a physical skill. If you're not interested in improving your physical skill, that's no trouble, but for athletes looking to improve, 3x/week is absolutely a minimum and more work produces more results.
Oct
10
comment Drills for training agility - cross art
@JohnP That was from Kurz. I've seen it repeated elsewhere as 1.5xBW squat, but haven't looked at its origin. I think the point is that prior to that, strength work produces greater explosiveness (as well as other benefits) than specific training for explosiveness such as depth jumps. For general bounding and jumping I wouldn't apply that prereq.
Oct
8
comment An Ontology of Combat
@AkosCz Thanks! But to be clear, none of these are my blogs or mind maps; I just collected them here.
Oct
1
comment Should I wear bandages?
It's not enough to downvote, and of course technique is important, but my experience is that the heavy bag is precisely the slice of training where one should be practicing power punching.
Sep
19
comment Supplementary Asian arts for Modern Medieval Armored Combat
@stslavik Your comments would do well as an answer. I don't see any particular need to split this question up.
Sep
9
comment Do Any Eastern Arts Use a Shield?
Yes, in a few Okinawan/Japanese karate dojo, and by the (quite rare) kobudo teachers.
Sep
6
comment Who is a person, Martial Art, who broke his hand when he tried to break the Tiles?
No. I don't have access to the book at the moment. I recommend finding the book online or getting your hands on a copy and reading for yourself.
Aug
17
comment How can you get a snappy and efficient vertical elbow strike?
How fit are you? How mobile are your shoulders? I can't tell without seeing you do the technique, but maybe you're not so flexible in that direction and you need to do some remedial mobility & strength work.
Aug
17
comment How can you get a snappy and efficient vertical elbow strike?
The correct way to practice striking at home alone without a punching bag is to troll craigslist for a cheap used punching bag.
Aug
7
comment How does one progress from tai chi push hands to free-sparring?
A similar progression from fixed-step tuishou to sanshou as similar to free fighting as possible is shown in this Yiquan video. This Bullshido thread has other videos and discusses the reasoning and history behind the rulesets.
Aug
4
comment What are the purposes of martial arts forms?
I'm sorry if I wasn't explicit about the best methodology to accomplish the goals of mental discipline and full body power. I think that methodology is learning and drilling fundamental techniques plus sparring. That's how artists of all disciplines develop those skills. One practices complete control over the whole body at all times during proper execution of those training methods. Kata is superfluous.
Aug
4
comment What are the purposes of martial arts forms?
So...do the kata develop it faster? Better? Or are they just the way karate folk happen to do it, no better than any other approach? I found kata unnecessary once I realized (as you note) that kihon and kumite are sufficient for training.
Aug
4
comment What are the purposes of martial arts forms?
Yeah, I've always noticed that boxers lack whole body power and BJJ fighters lack mental discipline. Wait, no, that's absurd.
Jul
30
comment What is the most efficient way for a beginner to improve his posture?
@BlueTrin Perhaps yoga and barbell training could fill in the gaps, to ensure that you have the requisite strength and mobility.
Jul
25
comment How to build up endurance when rolling?
Chris, your update would make a good answer.
Jul
25
comment How to build up endurance when rolling?
@ChristopherPerry So what if you're gassed? If you're not vomiting or getting injured you're learning something.