1,073 reputation
311
bio website twitter.com/jeunice
location Nashua, NH
age 49
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Nov 17 at 22:49

Considerable training: Kung fu (Five Animal/Five Element, Shaolin Long Fist, Drunken Boxing, Yang and Chen T'ai chi ch'uan, Baguazhang, Chin Na), Daoist Qigong

Actively training: boxing, kickboxing, Small Circle Jujitsu, Reality Based Self Defense, BJJ

Some training: Judo, Jujutsu, Eskrima, Wing Chun, Kenpō, Combat Hapkido, Xing Yi Quan, Muay Thai

Weapons: Staff (Shaolin Windstaff, Two Brothers), broadsword (Tiger Tornado), Two-handed Broadsword (nandao and dadao), straight sword (jian; Eight Drunken Immortals; Man, Heaven, and Earth; Chen Sword), Nunchaku, other flexible weapons, Eskrima short sticks/yantok, firearms, nuclear launch codes


Jul
8
answered Can Karate/Hand Chops be lethal?
Jul
8
revised Best to learn for self defense: Wrestling, Boxing, or Jiu Jitsu
added missing word
Jul
8
comment Best to learn for self defense: Wrestling, Boxing, or Jiu Jitsu
That there is a "unicorn boxing" is very amusing. But on that video, while sifu has some good trapping-range moves, he never moves off his opponent's centerline. Ugh. He also wraps his own arms up in ways that are going to lead to bad outcomes when executed at speed. Worse if his opponent has any skill at all at trapping. You're not going to want to depend on that style for self defense.
Jul
2
answered Best to learn for self defense: Wrestling, Boxing, or Jiu Jitsu
Jul
2
awarded  Yearling
Jan
2
awarded  Necromancer
Dec
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Yearling
Oct
17
comment Force with a spear
That long pole weapons are relatively slow to move (excepting the "offset double cone" range of movement allowed by pivoting or levering action) is not controversial. There are good techniques for quickly pivoting, and I love them too. But however well-wielded, it takes more time and energy to move the tip of a 2m or 3m weapon through N degrees of arc than it does a shorter, lighter weapon. Longer poles and/or glaive blades make the weapon even heavier and slower. So if you keep your opponent at effective range, you're golden. If they outflank you or slip inside your range, OH NO!
Sep
4
comment What are good martial arts for aging bodies?
I've heard that ibuprofen inhibits strength gains. But I've also seen the opposite: thefactsaboutfitness.com/research/painkillers.htm I'm not a bodybuilder, so for me getting back into full-energy practice is the key thing. YMMV.
Sep
3
revised Force with a spear
fixed misspelling ("safe" not "save")
Sep
2
revised Force with a spear
noted relationship between length and slowness to avoid flanking attacks
Sep
1
revised Force with a spear
missing "a"
Aug
31
answered What are good martial arts for aging bodies?
Aug
31
answered Force with a spear
Aug
21
comment What is the cause for Northern and Southern Chinese kung fu differences?
Those with longer reach (for kicking or punching) are more likely to use and evolve moves that involve longer reach. A large guy, I know I emphasize moves where my height, mass, and reach give me advantage (over opponents of whatever size). I don't emphasize moves that require moving my entire body super-fast, or dropping very low, or otherwise fighting my natural inertia. This isn't something I can "prove" played deeply into Northern/Southern style differences, but I've heard it said many times by sifus (of Northern, Southern, and Korean arts), and it makes sense to me. YMMV.
Aug
17
comment What is the cause for Northern and Southern Chinese kung fu differences?
Long distances and different languages/cultural traditions explain divergence, but not any specific divergence. Different body types go further. My understanding: The larger, taller bodies of Northerners lead toward, encourage, and support their typically higher kicks and more expansive movements (e.g. "Long Fist"), while the shorter, more compact bodies and more populated/crowded cities of the South motivate their more constrained, close-in techniques (seen in e.g. Hung Gar, "shadowless kicking," Wing Chun). If argued those factors are suggestive but not conclusive, I'd have to agree.
Aug
15
answered What is the cause for Northern and Southern Chinese kung fu differences?
Jul
31
comment Are martial arts suitable for a busy, IT professional?
We'll have to agree to disagree here. One of the best, most fit martial artists I know--now 3rd degree and head instructor of a school--was fat and unfit when he joined. Those who join from the military or a high level of fitness clearly start at a higher level. But I've seen a number of average to below-average fitness students progress well. The asker wants to reduce stress and "achieve peace of mind, and control over my life" rather than "be a good fighter." I see no reason he can't "just go."
Jul
30
comment Are martial arts suitable for a busy, IT professional?
When I rejoined martial arts after years away, one motivation was that wife had suffered a brain injury. She was having problems even walking. Terrible balance, and not great strength or cardio fitness post-convalescence. Her doctor recommended marital arts practice. The training indeed gave her the opportunity, means, and motivation to improve. If she can train successfully, almost anyone can. I've never seen a modern school you needed to already be fit to join. It helps, sure. But required? No, IMO. Not at all.