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seen Oct 12 '12 at 1:34

Jul
26
comment What can one do to avoid entering a grappling situation?
1 I like, 2 is better than doing nothing, but not something I'd want to rely on, 3 knees are highly overrated for stopping a takedown unless you already have a solid Thai Clinch (which counts as passivity in wrestling, and isn't half bad for delaying a takedown itself), 4 I'd be wary of trying without testing on someone with thick forearms and great grip strength who will not let go unless they have no choice.
Jul
26
comment Why do martial artists “shout” in the execution of a technique?
Often kiai in Judo is to convince the ref/judge that you were doing the move so they don't score something else for your opponent.
Jul
23
comment Quickly learning the full essentials of Krav Maga
I would agree with this. It's my understanding that everyone in Israel, aside from a few religious subgroups, are/were IDF members, so the military/civilian distinction for Krav Maga is almost meaningless.
Jul
23
comment Shoulder brace for Judo?
Muscles can be fully recovered (ie strengthened), but once ligaments are stretched, they're stretched. I might be able to look into prolotherapy as was mentioned before, but that depends on a doctor actually thinking it's necessary. Given that, I'm looking at no more than 95% recovery, and stretched ligaments are always more likely to allow a joint dislocation in the future. Hence, why I was investigating shoulder braces.
Jul
22
comment How many (and what) things have I failed to do if I get into a fight?
If the only reason you're fighting is because you thought you could take the guy, your training has failed you.
Jul
20
comment How can you practice wrist locks/grappling holds without a partner?
Assuming you have trained against a resisting opponent prior, and know what it's like to do on a real person, then yeah, visualisation can certainly help.
Jul
19
comment What can one do to avoid entering a grappling situation?
If you don't wrestle, your sprawl won't be good enough. I also don't see how an uncommitted jab would deter anyone from clinching given that hard punches encourage boxers to clinch.
Jul
18
comment How does a non-grappler train to be ready to avoid grappling in a real-world situation?
I've also stopped fights with words. Anything is within the realm of possibility, but a persistent grappler won't be stopped without grappling, or a rare knocked out cold strike before a clinch can be established. I prefer not to rely on any assumed rules while I'm working, and my caution, awareness and control at various pre-fight and post-fight stages have served me well.
Jul
18
comment How does a non-grappler train to be ready to avoid grappling in a real-world situation?
You do need a knockout, and pain only works on wimps. I've been hit hard enough that I had fish legs, and I dropped to the ground. I still got the takedown and mount. Context makes a difference, sure, but not to the extent you believe. In general, training and fighting MMA with skilled opponents is far more challenging than fighting on the street. I work as a bouncer, no rules in the bar or on the sidewalk. It doesn't change, I always get the clinch, and it's always way easier.
Jul
18
comment How does a non-grappler train to be ready to avoid grappling in a real-world situation?
Unless you actually break the knee, just kicking at it won't do anything, and even if you do, it's got to be broken badly. I've finished a fight with a subluxed knee cap, using grappling, and it didn't impede my progress in the least. I've also taken eye gouges and throat strikes, and neither did anything. If you're too crappy at striking that you can't land a knockout, you're screwed, and if you're good enough, you're better just trying to go for the elusive one hit KO.
Jul
18
comment How does a non-grappler train to be ready to avoid grappling in a real-world situation?
That said, it is still good advice, just not for the stated purpose. Retracting your punches quickly is good for avoiding striking counter attacks.
Jul
18
comment How does a non-grappler train to be ready to avoid grappling in a real-world situation?
I'm always skeptical of claims like this, although thank you for your disclaimer. Have you tested it against an actual grappler, rather than someone trained in Blauer's system who happens to attempt to grapple?
Jul
17
comment How does a non-grappler train to be ready to avoid grappling in a real-world situation?
That isn't going to help, they're not going to try to grab your arms or legs, they're going to grab your body, and you can't keep your hips or shoulders retracted.
Jul
16
comment How to get fit (again) for Judo
Poorly done squats are bad for your knees, well done squats are good for your knees. I'd lean towards bodyweight squats being potentially worse because of the higher reps you need to do to get any results from them, so any effects of poor form are amplified.
Jul
16
comment Is there any documentation of newaza in Fusen-Ryu?
@stslavik can't say I've ever seen the kanji for it, I suppose you could go backwards and find out what the kanji for that school in question is
Jul
14
comment Is there any documentation of newaza in Fusen-Ryu?
@DaveLiepmann if I can find it at the library and it hasn't been checked out.
Jul
12
comment Shoulder brace for Judo?
Thanks. I hadn't considered the point about increasing resistance to rotation, that's something I'll be discussing with physio and chiro to see where the risks and benefits lie for my specific situation. The impact protection plate also looks good for helping avoid a seperated shoulder from the suplex (although obviously I'll be doing my best to avoid letting anyone WPR me from behind).
Jul
12
comment Shoulder brace for Judo?
I did state in the question that I intended to have it strengthened first. The brace isn't for weak muscles, it would be for the ligaments, which can't be rehabbed.
Jul
6
comment Why do taekwondoists bounce so much? (And how do we help them stop?)
How is their squatting ability? If they lack the strength to squat to thighs parallel while holding someone their own weight in a fireman's carry (think kata guruma) that'll be a significant barrier to them lowering their hips enough for a throw.
Jul
6
comment Why do taekwondoists bounce so much? (And how do we help them stop?)
Putting your weight fully on your heels is a bad habit - makes it a lot easier to get thrown, particularly with morote gari. While it might correct for being bouncy, it'll be something they'll have to once again correct later.