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bio website hosheng.blogspot.com
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visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Apr 11 at 4:10

Feb
19
comment What's the difference between Internal and External martial arts?
Technically, what you described above is not the classical definition of "internal" vs. "external". It's the modern definition of "internal" vs. "external".
Oct
3
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
Yes, I am aware that you gave yourself an exception to book knowledge. I don't see how that is different from reverse engineering, though it is obviously acceptable to SE in general. In addition, you provided a bunch of your own opinions, conclusions, and interpretation based on those quotes in the last two paragraphs.
Oct
3
comment What does it mean to “uproot” someone in tai chi?
-1, theoretical speculation unbacked by personal experience or experimentation. Question is asked about "uproot for someone in taiji", but the author does not practice taijiquan or any of the related arts.
Oct
2
comment What are the applications and principles of this particular seven-star mantis stance?
@DaveLiepmann You are absolutely right. I suppose that little bit of Northern Preying Mantis I learned from a Northern Shaolin lineage holder did not give me enough depth to properly analyze this stance, especially since I only just remembered that after I wrote the answer off the top of my head, and I've only seen him do it a couple times. I will keep in mind your standards when next time you write or quote about taijiquan, xingiyquan, or baguazhang in the future.
Oct
2
comment What strength and conditioning exercises are used in tai chi?
@DaveLiepmann Right. Armchair. Noted. Thanks for clearing that up, I have been wondering about that.
Oct
1
comment What strength and conditioning exercises are used in tai chi?
Since you seem to have a personal standard you're holding others to, I ask you: are you receiving a transmission from a particular taijiquan teacher, or is all of this merely armchair answer?
Oct
1
comment What are the applications and principles of this particular seven-star mantis stance?
@DaveLiepmann You sure are assuming a lot of things. For one thing, according to the story, the OP is not receiving the transmission. The purpose is to exercise functional fluidity in order to enhance your primary art, not to say that "I know Mantis". Ah well, the bigger the tree, the bigger it falls :-)
Oct
1
comment What are the applications and principles of this particular seven-star mantis stance?
@DaveLiepmann Wow, whatever floats your boat, man.
Oct
1
comment What are the applications and principles of this particular seven-star mantis stance?
So while I know you are trying to say, you don't know Seven-Star Praying Mantis, saying "I don't know Kung-Fu" is like saying "I don't know budo" when referring to Aikido.
Oct
1
comment What are the applications and principles of this particular seven-star mantis stance?
The question is awkward. Not only is it written badly, it also encourages functional fixedness instead of functional fluidity. It should be changed to, "What are some applications for this particular Seven-Star Mantis stance?" If possible, the name of this shi (勢) should be determined and substituted for "this particular ... stance".
Jun
26
comment How do I improve my attack speed?
@DaveLiepmann I've seen this training outside of my primary art. By default, do the forms much slower and lower and do not "fall" into the step. If you do them at slow speed, it forces you to remain balanced on a single leg until the probing leg touches the next spot. Over time, you become more difficult to uproot. Xingyi has specifically a footwork called "half step", where the first step is 1.5 strides ahead, and the other foot follow steps. It appears so often in the forms that you end up practicing that the most.
Jun
19
comment How do I increase my wrist strength for punching?
+1. Glad you brought this up.
Jun
12
comment Did Karate really originate in the Okinawa region of Japan?
@Trevoke that's the story and I'm sticking with it. Sadly, I have heard non-martial-artist native Chinese speakers use "gong fu" the way Americans use "karate" or "gong fu" to mean "martial arts". Kids there grow up wanting to be computer programmers these days. Lots of these traditions are disappearing, fast. These days, I hear old school martial artists use simply "fu", as a code-word for the old meaning of "gong fu".
Jun
7
comment Are there good alternatives to wood for weapons?
Purple Heart will do custom wasters and bokken out of some interesting materials.
Jun
5
comment Will engraving a staff made of white waxwood compromise its integrity?
@DaveLiepmann Yes. You're confusing correlation with causality. Framing it as, "In my personal experience having used my stick with lots of force many times, these etchings creates a lot of problems." That gives your words more credibility than the assumed credibility in your present words.
Jun
5
comment Will engraving a staff made of white waxwood compromise its integrity?
@Trevoke It's not that this question is inappropriate for this forum; it's that you'll get much better answers elsewhere.
Jun
5
comment Will engraving a staff made of white waxwood compromise its integrity?
@DaveLiepmann Would you mind adding that bit to your answer. I find personal experience useful, however your phrasing makes it sound as if you are pulling from authoritative sources.
Jun
5
comment Will engraving a staff made of white waxwood compromise its integrity?
@Trevoke I'd definitely ask the Armor Archive folks about structural integrity (and wood grain, etc). A. Dill is a good person to ask, and he has contacts elsewhere. You might be able to protect the grain from splintering by using resin to fill in the engraving.
Jun
5
comment Will engraving a staff made of white waxwood compromise its integrity?
Perhaps this is a better question to ask on the Armor Archive.
Jun
5
comment Will engraving a staff made of white waxwood compromise its integrity?
Can you describe your source? Some research, or personal experience, or your imagination?