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Jul
22
comment Weapons in taekwondo?
Welcome to the site. This is a nice answer but lacks references. If you were to add some, it would be a great answer.
Jul
21
comment Do ninja follow the bushido?
This needs sources! Just because I am interested in seeing those primaries sources as well...
Jul
16
comment Will training Muay Thai affect my BJJ skills?
Your friends statements lack a reason as to why Muay Thai would affect BJJ. Without said reasons, we cannot state whether they are correct or not. I suggest either adding those reasons or remove that part of the question. I even lean towards the latter as it is not necessary for the question to be a good one.
Jul
15
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
@CortAmmon: There are no topics at the fringe of science. Science is a method to understand the world. 'nuff said.
Jul
14
comment How painful is it for professional fighters to get hit
@CortAmmon: I think your comment would make a fine answer. You could even gauge the perceived pain on the pain scale.
Jul
14
comment How painful is it for professional fighters to get hit
@MattLerner: I believe the question to be different enough so that it merits different answers. Although, they should be linked.
Jul
14
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
@CortAmmon: Anyone is welcome to believe whatever mythical paradigm they chose. Believe, by definition, is accpecting something as true without evidence. If one is asking for evidence for their mythical paradigm, then they have to obey the scientific method or be labelled a fraud.
Jul
14
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
If qi is nothing but biomechanics/neuromechanics, then we should use correct term: either biomechanics or neuromechanics. If qi is something else, then what is it? If you cannot define it, then it is useless to name it. Furthermore, one cannot create an experiment without (at least) a clear hypothesis of what you are trying to validate.
Jul
13
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
"What I am mainly trying to point out you should feel something and be able to personally verify that certain exercises produce particular feelings" -- So any feeling you have either while doing or after exercise is "qi"? All that can be explain without referring to a mythical energy thus rendering qi either utter non-sense or a catch all term for "you have exercised".
Jul
13
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
-1, no definition of Qi, using mystical explanation for something that is easily explained by bio mechanics, and flawed experiment.
Jul
10
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
-1. This does not even come close to using the scientific method. What is your hypothesis? What is your controlled repeatable experiment? What are your expected measurable results? How are you going to filter bias? How are you going to use a control group? This question reads like a thinly veiled attempt at quackery promoting the existence of qi/chi.
Jul
10
comment What is a fast way for a beginner to experience qi unambiguously in their own body?
-1. Do 30 minutes of exercise (cardiac and weights) a day for six months and eat more healthily: Feel the difference. Do no exercise and eat McDonald food for six moths: Feel the difference. Did I "prove" Qi/Chi? In addition, this does not follow any scientific method whatsoever: no clear hypothesis, no control group, not repeatable, no expected results...
Jul
3
comment More dirty tricks in Ju Jitsu compared to other martial arts?
Do not accept an answer too soon. I tend to leave it for 24hours at least so as to encourage others to write their own answers.
Jul
3
comment More dirty tricks in Ju Jitsu compared to other martial arts?
Someone teaching to actively do long lasting harm to somebody else is likely to get you on the wrong end of LEO should you ever use it. Please see a defence lawyer in your local for more details.
Jul
2
comment Are McDojo fees worth it for a good school/instructor?
WOW, those fees are high!...
Jun
30
comment Should my body type influence my choice of martial art to learn?
+1. That is a very vehement statement. In addition, your statement about modifying a style if a person is disabled is spot on and should be highlighted.
Jun
29
comment Until one has mastered a martial art, is one actually more vulnerable to attack than before training began?
Aikido: Yes, it is true that it take longer to become proficient than in some other arts. Ueshiba even stated that you should have degree of competence in another art before starting Aikido but, as we know, he was somewhat mental -- said with the uttermost respect. However, we start sparring at the first session: just get out of the way of the strike for now. So, we do train to avoid from the zeroth hour.
Jun
26
comment Left handed Japanese sword techniques
In Aikido, we do sometimes do the sword kata on the left and/or in decreasing order. However, this is always to train your brain to do things differently and not "historically accurate".
Jun
26
comment Why a Samurai always wore katana on the left side?
What do you mean by "Samurai schools"? Samurai were a class, you were either born into it or promoted into it. Samurai was never a degree you could get some any schools.
Jun
26
comment Why a Samurai always wore katana on the left side?
Where did you read that sword schools in Japan (I assume that's what you mean by "Samurai schools") did not care about eft hand or right handedness? As far as I am aware, there are no left handed sword schools in Japan.