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No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (One overbearing organization, the IBJJF, actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for an extended period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3-4 days per week.

No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (One overbearing organization, the IBJJF, actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for an extended period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3 days per week.

No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (One overbearing organization, the IBJJF, actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for an extended period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3-4 days per week.

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No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (TheOne overbearing organization, the IBJJF actually, actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for an extended period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3 days per week.

No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (The IBJJF actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for an extended period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3 days per week.

No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (One overbearing organization, the IBJJF, actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for an extended period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3 days per week.

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No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (The IBJJF actually forcestries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for a longan extended period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3 days per week.

No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (The IBJJF actually forces people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for a long period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3 days per week.

No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit.

There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (The IBJJF actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal submissions, points, round time, etc.) Many have their own belt time and age requirements, but few of these "official requirements" are actually respected by BJJ or MMA gyms. The decision to promote someone is 100% up to the coach, regardless of time. One of my favorite examples of this is when BJ Penn was promoted from white belt to black belt in 3 years. The IBJJF threw a huge fit because it didn't fit their criteria. BJ Penn went on to win a world championship.

Someone that claims they are purposely staying at white belt is likely making excuses for their lack of training. Their coach probably just doesn't think they're ready to be promoted. I would immediately question his "training to do tournaments" reason. White belts can start competing almost immediately. Since YOU PAY to enter the tournament, and don't win any money at white belt, there is no incentive to "sandbag" at white belt. Not to mention the fact that crushing people at a white belt tournament makes everyone roll their eyes. You pretty much get to do that once, and your coach needs to make a decision about promoting you. Every BJJ coach I know would be embarrassed to have one of their white belts continue to win gold medals for an extended period of time.

In the case you're talking about, 3 years isn't at all uncommon. 2 years is a normal time from white to blue when you're training about 3 days per week.

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