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There is MUA method or manipulation under anesthesia. I was wondering if such a method would help increase flexibility like achieving a front or side split? Did anybody try it?

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    Do you have a problem with manipulation without anesthesia (exercise)? – mattm Sep 30 at 13:09
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    A fact that should be considered here is that joints (tendons, ligaments) take three to six times longer than muscles to adjust to change in strength or flexibility. Accordingly, forcing muscles to instant flexibility (which in most cases means some extent of injuring the muscles themselves), this makes injuries due to unadjusted joints and connective tissue a real problem, even if and when the muscles are healed. Sometimes, inflexibility also means structural stability the loss of which further stresses the joints and makes them prone for injury. Not a good idea, really. – Philip Klöcking Oct 5 at 19:29
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I think it is VERY dangerous, because you can injure or break your ligaments - and that would ruin everything.

And, from the other side, it is a misrespect to other students, detracting their work, because (if you succeed) reduces your amount of pain and hard work, gaining the same result in a more easy way.

Generally, it strongly contradicts with the spirit of MA, for me.

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This is dangerous.

If it would be a reasonable way to gain flexibility, it would be common practice. A lot of people dream doing splits.

The pain is annoying, also for me, but it indicates how far you can go savely. Again and again bit more increases the flexibility. Muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints need time to adjust. Breaking one of these makes you more flexible, but more in a wobbly way.

My goal is a seiza without pain, a split is a dream for me.

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