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I tried to look online, but I couldn't find anything like this (Google doesn't exactly like long descriptive explanations). Here's the deal.

Attacker is in a sitting position, holding the opponent in guard, possibly, but not necessarily controlling the opponents hands and preventing the opponent from blocking the sweep. Attacker then uses ones feet to push the opponents leg backwards, breaking their balance, and rotating the opponent on their back.

I've seen it in Judo and BJJ.

Edit as answer to comment: It's not much different from a scissor sweep, same principle. I've seen it in competitions and in training, and I do it myself.

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    Welcome to the site,. This really would be improved with a diagram, a photo, or even better a video. However, not knowing the name of the technique makes this difficult. Can you remember where/when you saw this? – Sardathrion Aug 2 '17 at 15:13
  • @Sardathrion The description was good enough IMO. As an experienced BJJ practitioner I immediately knew what he was referring to. You are right though, pictures/videos are always helpful. Tough to find when you don't know what it's called though! – coinbird Aug 2 '17 at 18:26
  • @coinbird That is good! – Sardathrion Aug 3 '17 at 6:42
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You're describing the knee push variation of "Scissor Sweep." It's very common in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

There are two main ways to do it from full guard. Both involve getting control of one arm in either double wrist control, or arm drag position. For the sake of this example we'll say you have their right arm.

Method 1: Classic Scissor Sweep

While keeping your arm control, hip off so you're facing the side of the arm you have. You have their right arm, so you're on your left hip. Bring your right knee up to their chest (Z guard position). Drop your left leg to the ground. Three movements happen here at the same time.

  • Pull the arm toward you (ideally across the body, but not necessary)
  • Kick your left leg in hard, chopping out their leg
  • Kick your right leg to the left, moving their upper body over 180 degrees.

You will end up in mount or side control. Worst case is half guard.

Method 2: Knee Push Variation

This is the one you described. While keeping your arm control, hip off so you're facing the side of the arm you have. You have their right arm, so you're on your left hip. Bring your right knee up to their chest (Z guard position). Drop your left leg to the ground and put your foot on their knee. Three movements happen here at the same time.

  • Pull the arm toward you (ideally across the body, but not necessary)
  • Kick your left foot hard, pushing their knee backward. It will straighten backward causing them to lose balance.
  • Kick your right leg to the left, moving their upper body over 180 degrees.

The idea is you switch back and forth between threatening method 1 and 2. They defend method 1, you hit method 2, etc. It's an extremely effective sweep. The main danger you face is someone hopping over your sweeping leg when you drop it to the ground and them taking side control. Be prepared to bring you leg back into your body to recover guard if you fail.

As for the origin, most guard techniques are attributed to Carlos Gracie, as guard was not a common position in Judo until Carlos' adaptation to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

  • Great answer! I'd +1 you if I could. Maybe sometime soon. I'd never thought about alternating between them but it does make sense. Is it still the same technique if you transform it into an armbar instead? – user8472 Aug 2 '17 at 16:50
  • @user8472 Thanks. You can still mark it as the accepted answer! Are you talking about an arm bar from guard? Countless guard sweeps and subs start from single arm control (2 on 1) or an arm drag. So yes, the setup is similar to an arm bar. The differences are, you don't drop your leg to the ground, you don't get Z guard (because you're throwing the leg over their face), and you need to stay in TIGHT, rather than creating space with Z guard. – coinbird Aug 2 '17 at 17:01
  • @user8472 If you're talking about from mount, it's a perfect transition. You keep the arm that you grabbed for the sweep, and continue through the rest of the classic arm bar from mount technique. I should note that unless you're drilling, sparring, or a real badass, I'm not a fan of giving up that top position you just worked so hard for to attempt an arm bar. Work your mount subs, side control subs, or if it's MMA, get your smash on! – coinbird Aug 2 '17 at 17:03
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    Got it. I understand the arm bar isn't the best thing around. Here's what I meant: I kick the leg back, but instead of going for the mount, I rotate myself under the opponent and place my leg over their throats (yes.) while controlling the arm, and I then either roll the opponent over (if I have momentum and a good grip) or flatten them down (if something hits the fan), the latter being rather dangerous as the opponent may rip their hand off and attack me from the back, but I know when to retreat. – user8472 Aug 2 '17 at 17:23
  • @user8472 Yeah, that's possible. It's just not ideal, because you need your Z guard leg and body momentum to toss them over if they have halfway decent balance. You could slip into an arm bar like that if you're wayyyy more skilled than your opponent, but if not they would likely get top position on you. Like the old saying goes, position before submission. Get your mount, then attack the arm bar. – coinbird Aug 2 '17 at 18:23
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I think the sweep technique in question is similar to those in this image from Higher Judo: Ground Work by Moshe Feldenkrais published by Frederick Warne & Co., Ltd, 1952: sweep

And closer to this undated video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlFJuYEw-Hw&feature=youtu.be&t=21s

I do not know a judo name associated with this sweep.

As for origin, I would suggest Japan and probably some form of jujutsu, but almost certainly predating BJJ.

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