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I got a very strong hit and it had almost no bruise. How is it possible to hit in this way? Is it a special technique?

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    If you have seen it happen for yourself, why are you asking whether it is possible? – mattm Oct 5 '17 at 19:27
  • To understand how can it be done? Has the attacker used special technique? Is there a way to faster protect yourself/ heal from such attacks? – Avi Oct 5 '17 at 19:33
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    This needs way more information. what kind of hit, what is the goal of the hit, what situation, is there a style of martial arts in question, etc... Way vague on this question, please add alot of specificity to get an answer. – mutt Oct 5 '17 at 22:15
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    Seems clear to me. What's the problem with this question and answer? – Huw Evans Oct 8 '17 at 15:07
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    Looks clear to me. He wants to know about hitting people hard without bruising them. How do you do it? – Huw Evans Oct 9 '17 at 10:51
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Yes, it is possible (As you have seen demonstrated on yourself).

What causes a bruise is actually blood leaking into tissue from damaged vessels. The colors of the bruise are the blood cells dying and decaying in the tissues and being reabsorbed.

Even if you get really hard, if the angle or surface area of the strike is such that no blood vessels get damaged, then you won't get leakage, and hence no bruise. This tends to happen with flatter strikes that have a large surface area (Such as an instep round kick to the outside thigh), or strikes that hit an area with a relatively low number of blood vessels.

If you get hit with a more concentrated force in a smaller area, then the odds of you getting a bruise from it go up. It is not, however, a guarantee that you will or will not get a bruise.

Additionally, if you do get an internal bruise, the blood may not make its way up enough to be visible. It is still there, just not visible.

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  • By answering a controversial question, you stopped it being revised into something better and answerable. As such, we are left with a terrible question and a poor answer. – Sardathrion - against SE abuse Oct 8 '17 at 14:17
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    @Sardathrion - You're right. We all make mistakes. – JohnP Oct 9 '17 at 14:33
  • I have made my share as well. What is the saying? Ah, yes: wise men learn from other people 's mistakes! – Sardathrion - against SE abuse Oct 9 '17 at 18:10

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