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In my Taekwondo classes we sometimes train throws, in the context of self defense (hoshinsul). I'm bothered that, when being thrown, I can see that the way in falling is not the best and I'm getting too much impact when hitting the mat (even if gym mats are used).

In fact, learning to fall when thrown is not something trained often in TKD classes. What kind of exercises I could do on my own, at home, to improve this?

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    The site's current tag for falling is the Japanese term ukemi. – mattm May 4 '18 at 1:29
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    The best way to practise falling, is to practise falling - if you have access to a tatami area or soft ground, you can practise these exercises: How to do Judo breakfalls - Judo basics (Beyond Grappling) – brazofuerte Sep 11 '19 at 12:48
  • That's an instructive video. People might miss this comment; you should promote your comment to an answer. – Daniel Reis Sep 12 '19 at 8:03
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I suggest you check out the series of videos linked by judoinfo.com. The side and rear falls are the easiest to learn first. The videos go through a good progression, learning the process in reverse. You learn the position after a successful fall first, then start to fall from low positions and work your way up to standing and throwing.

  1. Start from a position on the ground, and learn to strike with your arm(s).
    1. This teaches you to distribute the impact of a fall and how to use your arms. The most common mistake is to brace out with a hand, which often results in spraining a wrist or shoulder.
    2. You keep your head up because falling and hitting your head is very bad.
  2. From a squatting position, roll into the position in #1 and perform #1. Rolling enables you to dissipate the energy of the fall over time and reduces impact.
  3. From a standing position, squat, then do #2-1.
  4. Practice cooperatively with partner throwing.
  5. Practice noncooperatively with partner throwing.

At home you can easily do #1-2. You probably want mat time when starting to learn #3.

The goal is to make good falling technique reflexive. When falling, you don't have time to think. If you find yourself thinking too long, go back to a simpler stage.

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  • Thank you, basic Judo is where I should look at, thank you for pointing the way. – Daniel Reis May 7 '18 at 12:25

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