3

Looking over the wikipedia list, it seems like some of the kakete techniques might be near or even pure analogs of judo throws. Kekaeshi for instance, would be a good candidate. But others involve grabbing the legs/ankles/feet and would be forbidden. The Nagete also seem like good candidates.

What would be the best way to compare these carefully to determine which are identical, which are similar but still significantly different, and which have no analog in the other art? I am moderately familiar with Judo, but unfamiliar with Sumo (don't exactly get NHK on basic cable here, nor do you see honbasho summaries in the sports section of the local paper).

4

If you throw, there is a name

Yes, there are overlaps. If you throw someone on their back, judo will have a name for it, and sumo will have a name for it. I imagine the classifiers will force throws into one category or another, even if they are sufficiently distant from the canonical versions that non-experts may not be able to identify them.

As I am more knowledgable of judo, my strategy would be to take sumo techniques and map them to judo ones.

Some examples:

Judo classified throws while touching the legs was legal, so even if a throw may not be competition-legal now, it will still have a name.

I will not pretend to understand how sumo classifies its techniques, so I can't do the reverse.

In judo, not in sumo

Sacrifice techniques will generally not be in sumo because of the danger of touching non-foot parts before the opponent lands.

In sumo, not judo

Anything where you win by pushing out or down without a throwing action.

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