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Questions tagged [japanese]

Relating to the Japanese language or martial arts originating in Japan such as aikido, judo, kendo, or jujutsu

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Was seiza intended to be impractical?

It's hard to argue that traditional seiza position isn't uncomfortable, and something that takes some time to get used to. Are there any benefits to Sitting Seiza? discusses potential benefits of ...
Macaco Branco's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
177 views

When bringing an opponent to kuzushi from a wrist/arm manipulation technique can all 8 points of balance be used?

According to Judo textbooks and diagrams there are 8 points of balance that can be used to topple an opponent/bring an opponent to kuzushi. When Aikido practitioners talk about kuzushi (which not all ...
Huw Evans's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
141 views

Are the names of the timing of counters eg Tai-no-Sen, Go-no-Sen used in martial arts other than Shorinji Kempo?

In Shorinji Kempo instruction we are often told to practice a counter with a specific timing. These timings are named as follows: go-no-sen, block and then counter attack, (usually requires ...
Huw Evans's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
347 views

Is the sword stance in Like a Dragon: Ishin where swordsmen place their palm flat against the hilt a style of Tennen Rishin-ryū?

In the video game Like A Dragon: Ishin, a major plot point is finding information about the Tennen Rishin style practiced by members of the Shinsengumi during the Bakumatsu period (1853-1867) in Japan....
Stevoisiak's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
2k views

Difference between renraku-waza and renzoku-waza

Judo has a lot of terms inherited from Japanese. Two such are renraku- and renzoku-waza. In the BJA syllabus these are translated as: Renzoku-waza is the Japanese terminology for combinations of ...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
81 views

Why do so many Japanese Martial Arts have a (different) technique called tsubame gaeshi?

Japanese sword forms, Judo and Shorinji Kempo all have a technique called Tsubame Gaeshi (which roughly translates to swallow counter). Why is the phrase Tsubame Gaeshi considered sufficiently ...
Huw Evans's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
3k views

Who are Tori and Uke?

Many questions about aikido and judo refer to partners as Tori and Uke. The name of a throw where the tori starts from a headlock Etymology and meaning of ukemi Name this technique against Chudan ...
mattm's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
133 views

Help learning Japanese Weapon Martial Arts?

I'm in the unfortunate position that I'm interested in Japanese martial arts employing weapons, but there aren't any teachers/dojos in my are that I can go to. And the ones that are far away aren't ...
Byzantine's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
172 views

Naming system of Judo techniques

Is there a system to the way judo techniques are named? Many techniques seem to share components of names (harai, guruma, gaeshi etc) - is there a standard uniform way these words should be ...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
917 views

Etymology of Tsubame-gaeshi?

Why is tsubame-gaeshi ("swallow reversal") thus named? Wouldn't it have been more natural to name it deashi-gaeshi in line with the other kaeshi counter-throws?* * Osoto-gaeshi, ouchi-gaeshi, uchi-...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
190 views

Etymology of Yama-Arashi?

Most1 Kodokan judo techniques are named in a somewhat systematised way, describing the major visual/mechanical components of the technique (e.g. koshi-guruma "hip wheel", o-soto-gari "major outer reap"...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
139 views

Does "do" v. "jutsu" naming reflect Daoist influence?

I have read about the naming changes in Japanese martial arts, with a shift from jutsu (術) to do (道) reflecting a supposed shift in emphasis from fighting techniques to a quest for mental and physical ...
mattm's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
186 views

Why is a "scarf hold" so-named if you don't wrap around the opponent's neck (like a scarf)?

Judo's kesa-gatame is often translated as "scarf hold", but the technique is defined by wrapping your arms and upper body around uke's neck and arm, more like a seatbelt, as opposed to wrapping around ...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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11 votes
2 answers
570 views

Is shaking hands after a judo competition bad etiquette in Japan?

Judo contains a number of rituals inherited from Japanese culture, one example being the codification of bowing to your opponent before and after competing.1 However bowing doesn't carry the same ...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
503 views

Origin of kawazu-gake?

There have been multiple proposed etymologies for the judo throw kawazu-gake (河津掛): Named after a famed sumo wrestler, Kawazu Saburo Sukeyasu Named after "frog" (蛙 old japanese kawazu, ...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
939 views

Why is the first dan called shodan, as opposed to ichidan?

Subsequent dan grades in judo are named numerically nidan (二段), sandan (三段) etc, but the first grade is called shodan (初段) "beginning grade". Is there a particular reason for this as opposed to the ...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
651 views

Etymology of tomoe-nage?

Tomoe-nage is often translated as "stomach throw" or "circle throw", but these are not direct translations. What does tomoe mean, and why is the throw called this?
brazofuerte's user avatar
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12 votes
1 answer
2k views

De-ashi-harai or De-ashi-barai?

I have seen 出足払 ("advancing foot sweep") written two ways by the Kodokan, with the 払 part transcribed as 'harai' (は)1 or 'barai' (ば).2 3 How is the name of this technique pronounced in Japanese? With ...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
326 views

Which style to cross train with Southern Mantis Kung Fu?

I have been training Southern Mantis Kung Fu for around 20 years. I started Hsing I Quan about 8 years ago. I was thinking of adding some throwing game, grappling etc but didn't want to go to BJJ. ...
Jay kumar's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
145 views

Did Samurai armour have flexible joints?

What type of armour was common for samurai? I would like to know if the armour had flexible joints versus totally flexible joints. I suppose the flexible joint armour came afterwards. To me some ...
Logikal's user avatar
  • 404
2 votes
2 answers
289 views

standing and crouching posture name in Aikido

I'm trying to remember the specific Japanese name of a common posture/stretch I used and heard of in Aikido during training and warming-up. Basically it was called by our sensei "standing and ...
dungeoncrawler's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
161 views

What is the name of the postition with the leg retracted (in japanese)?

Recently my karate teacher told us to find out the name of the position (or it might have been the act of retracting your leg after a kick - I can't remember) when you retract your leg after a kick. ...
beannshie's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
817 views

Accuracy and historical veracity of goshi-no-kata knife attack: Yakuza link?

In the Shodokan Aikido goshin-no-kata, there is a technique (the 24th one) where uke's steps with the tanto in both hands and draws it. Tori grabs uke's left hand and executes a tenkai-kote-hineri. ...
Sardathrion - against SE abuse's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
291 views

Are there any martial forms that utilize game boards as weapons?

Although this sounds absurd at first, there is a well known legend about the 12th Century samurai Satō Tadanobu beating back assassins with a goban. In the legend, he is said to have subsequently ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
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10 votes
3 answers
966 views

Why should "Oss" be used in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu?

Disclaimer: this is a potentially subjective question, so I'm looking for answers to "why" with references. What is your experience and historical understanding of the use of the word? I've moved to ...
jacefarm's user avatar
  • 392
6 votes
2 answers
759 views

What is the etymology and meaning of Oss?

I've moved to a new location, and have started training with a new Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu school. My previous school made absolutely no use of the word "oss". It is, however, ubiquitous with my new ...
jacefarm's user avatar
  • 392
7 votes
1 answer
178 views

What is "Direct Penetration" from The Book of Five Rings book of Water?

The translation of the book of Water of The Book of Five Rings at http://www.bookoffiverings.com/WaterBook.htm states: The spirit of Direct Penetration is handed down in the true Way of the Ni To ...
Iiridayn's user avatar
  • 173
5 votes
3 answers
376 views

Kendô, iaidô, jôdô, battodô, chanbara... Which one should I pick?

I stopped practising judô and jiu-jitsu some years ago, at a blue belt level, because I wasn't enjoying this martial art as much as I used to. However, I still love the philosophy of it, and would ...
user avatar
10 votes
4 answers
3k views

Left handed Japanese sword techniques

As far as I am aware, there are no left handed sword techniques in Japanese sword arts. At least, I am not aware of there being such. If it is true, does anyone have a good explanation as to why? If ...
Sardathrion - against SE abuse's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
11k views

Why did a Samurai always wear their katana on the left side?

A katana is traditionally used with both hands. But why is it always on the left side? I have read that in the Samurai schools they don't care much about the student are left handed or right handed. ...
AFetter's user avatar
  • 1,264
3 votes
1 answer
594 views

Stahara word usage

In the 1920 text, Secrets of Jujitsu by Captain Allan Smith (the pdf is readily available by googling), Smith refers to the abdominal region as the "Stahara". I've done some Japanese arts before, but ...
The Wudang Kid's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
408 views

Etymology and meaning of ukemi

I believe that ukemi can be translated as receiving body (受け身). It is what uke (受け, whoever receives the technique) does when nage (投げ thrower) or tori (取り, grabber) applies a technique. Am I correct ...
Sardathrion - against SE abuse's user avatar
11 votes
6 answers
2k views

Why is osoto guruma named osoto "guruma"?

Osoto gari translates to "large outer reap". That makes perfect sense as it is a large reap on the outer leg. Osoto guruma translates to "large outer wheel" and the "wheel&...
deadghost's user avatar
  • 621
15 votes
2 answers
491 views

"Aikido is first and foremost BUDO"

The above sentence has been attributed to O'Sensei and I'd like to use it as a motto for my dojo's website. Problem: I can't find a reliable source about when/where he said this. Or a proper Japanese ...
p.marino's user avatar
  • 575
21 votes
5 answers
12k views

Ju-jutsu vs Jiu-jitsu?

What's the difference between Ju-jutsu and Jiu-jitsu? In Sweden we only have Ju-jutsu and I have noticed that in the USA they have both Ju-jutsu and Jiu-jitsu and they look like the same thing.
Mikael Svensson's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
5k views

Blocking with a katana blade

Are there any school/style of Japanese swordsmanship that teach blocking (a parry or deflect is fine as long as there is contact between them) incoming attacks with the sharp edge of the blade of a ...
Sardathrion - against SE abuse's user avatar
11 votes
3 answers
417 views

Is there a good translation for all the terms used in Aikido?

I find it extremely difficult to memorise all terms - there is no connection to me with them. Is there a good German or English translation for all terms used in Aikido?
Nils's user avatar
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