Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about words, phrases and definitions that are specific to martial arts.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
0 answers
45 views

Why do so many Japanese Martial Arts have a (different) technique called tsubame gaeshi?

Japanese sword forms, Judo and Shorinji Kempo all have a technique called Tsubame Gaeshi (which roughly translates to swallow counter). Why is the phrase Tsubame Gaeshi considered sufficiently ...
user avatar
  • 2,840
3 votes
1 answer
263 views

Why is it called Truck Attack?

Why is this attack called Truck Attack/Position in BJJ?
user avatar
  • 1,567
2 votes
2 answers
91 views

What is the difference between Uchi-Mata and Hane-Goshi?

Classical uchi-mata involves reaping uke's back leg up and twisting them over their grounded off-balanced leg. However a common competition variant involves loading uke on tori's waist and reaping ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

Non-kodokan throws in the BJA syllabus?

The BJA syllabus lists a number of non-kodokan names for throws. Some of them are clearly names for common competition variants,1 but some I have never heard of e.g. ashi-dori, which looks to me like ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
3 votes
1 answer
77 views

What is the technical name for this movement performed by Master Wong in Birth of the Dragon?

I recently watched Birth of the Dragon on Netflix, and absolutely loved it. However, one particular movement caught my eye above all others, simply for the overwhelming appearance that something ...
user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
122 views

What does it mean to "eat bitter" in Chinese gongfu

This is an old Chinese idiom, but it seems to have a special importance in Chinese martial arts, where it might be said to be a central maxim. Essentially, some form of: "To get good gongfu, ...
user avatar
  • 2,991
4 votes
3 answers
102 views

What is the difference between a sword and a knife? Which are machetes?

I've gotten interested in the metallurgy of blades, and been watching a lot of early Forged in Fire. It's interesting to see basic applications with different blades by people who handle a lot of ...
user avatar
  • 2,991
5 votes
1 answer
144 views

Meaning of the Chinese Sifu? (Shifu)

I ask because it is commonly regarded as having the exact sense of Sensei, of Master, or Teacher, but these don't convey the full meaning. Sensei, for instance, shares the same characters as the ...
user avatar
  • 2,991
6 votes
2 answers
158 views

What does "create a frame" mean?

I've seen "create a frame" on many martial arts websites, but what does this signify? The Tripod Position: A Tool to Help Any Athlete Move Better | Breaking Muscle The working concept is ...
user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
126 views

What is the meaning of the pseudonym Eui-Am in TaeKwon-Do?

I have been searching for the meaning of the pseudonym Eui-Am. I know the definition, but what does it mean. This is the most I can find "The Taekwondo pattern Eui-Am was named in honor of Son ...
user avatar
  • 41
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

Who are Tori and Uke?

Many questions about aikido and judo refer to partners as Tori and Uke. The name of a throw where the tori starts from a headlock Etymology and meaning of ukemi Name this technique against Chudan ...
user avatar
  • 13.7k
2 votes
3 answers
215 views

Is the 'sticker' a kosoto-gake, or de-ashi-barai?

There is a foot-sweep technique in Judo known as "the sticker", 1 2 3 4 5 though it is variously described as a variant of kosoto-gari / gake, and de-ashi-barai. How does the Kodokan classify this ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
3 votes
2 answers
129 views

Naming system of Judo techniques

Is there a system to the way judo techniques are named? Many techniques seem to share components of names (harai, guruma, gaeshi etc) - is there a standard uniform way these words should be ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
0 votes
1 answer
158 views

What is "momo-guruma"?

What kind of judo throw is momo-guruma? It doesn't appear to be recognised by the Kodokan by this name, how is it performed and/or classified?
user avatar
  • 7,292
2 votes
1 answer
645 views

Etymology of Tsubame-gaeshi?

Why is tsubame-gaeshi ("swallow reversal") thus named? Wouldn't it have been more natural to name it deashi-gaeshi in line with the other kaeshi counter-throws?* * Osoto-gaeshi, ouchi-gaeshi, uchi-...
user avatar
  • 7,292
2 votes
1 answer
293 views

What is "Tengu-nage"?

Famous judoka Yokoyama Sakujirō was known by the nickname Tengu, and his tokui-waza was hence named tengu-nage: Yokoyama's specialty was tengu-nage ("mountain-devil throw"), said to be nearly on a ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
2 votes
1 answer
112 views

Etymology of Yama-Arashi?

Most1 Kodokan judo techniques are named in a somewhat systematised way, describing the major visual/mechanical components of the technique (e.g. koshi-guruma "hip wheel", o-soto-gari "major outer reap"...
user avatar
  • 7,292
6 votes
2 answers
636 views

What is Uki-gatame?

In 2017 the Kodokan recognised 3 new osaekomi-waza classifications: Osaekomi-waza Notes ura-gatame Historically has referred to multiple pins, but in modern use refers to a hold with tori's back to ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
4 votes
2 answers
355 views

Is there a specific name for a downward-smashing roundhouse kick in Capoeira or other arts?

I can provide a descriptive image if necessary, but it seems reasonably evident to me. Normally, roundhouse kicks deliver a more lateral blow, generally striking and then pulling the leg back whether ...
user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
975 views

What is kubi-nage?

I have occasionally seen a throw called kubi-nage ("neck throw") referenced in Judo. This isn't a Kodokan-recognised name, but the throws I have seen described as it appear to be very similar to koshi-...
user avatar
  • 7,292
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the difference between a choke and a strangle?

In martial arts which permit submissions, a distinction is sometimes made between "chokes" and "strangles", however in my experience these terms are not used consistently. What is the difference ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
3 votes
1 answer
216 views

What is a "shoulder lock" in Judo terminology?

In a judo context, "elbow-lock" has a broader definition than in other martial arts, referring to both armbars and bent-arm rotational locks (since both manipulate the elbow joint for effect, ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
3 votes
1 answer
140 views

Why is a "scarf hold" so-named if you don't wrap around the opponent's neck (like a scarf)?

Judo's kesa-gatame is often translated as "scarf hold", but the technique is defined by wrapping your arms and upper body around uke's neck and arm, more like a seatbelt, as opposed to wrapping around ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
3 votes
3 answers
419 views

How is "Tai Chi Chuan" pronounced in Cantonese?

In the "lost interview" of Bruce Lee with Pierre Berton (1971) he says "Tai Chi Chuan" is Mandarin, but I don't fully get the Cantonese version when he tells it. I hear "Tai te kuen" ... but I'm not ...
user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
359 views

Origin of kawazu-gake?

There have been multiple proposed etymologies for the judo throw kawazu-gake (河津掛): Named after a famed sumo wrestler, Kawazu Saburo Sukeyasu Named after "frog" (蛙 old japanese kawazu, ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
9 votes
2 answers
617 views

Why is the first dan called shodan, as opposed to ichidan?

Subsequent dan grades in judo are named numerically nidan (二段), sandan (三段) etc, but the first grade is called shodan (初段) "beginning grade". Is there a particular reason for this as opposed to the ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
6 votes
1 answer
871 views

What is the difference between kosoto-gari and kosoto-gake?

Kosoto-gari and kosoto-gake are superficially similar techniques. I have seen many high level judoka call what I would have called -gari -gake and vice versa - what distinguishes these techniques?
user avatar
  • 7,292
4 votes
1 answer
437 views

Etymology of tomoe-nage?

Tomoe-nage is often translated as "stomach throw" or "circle throw", but these are not direct translations. What does tomoe mean, and why is the throw called this?
user avatar
  • 7,292
3 votes
1 answer
710 views

What does "smash" mean in BJJ?

What does the term "smash" mean in a BJJ context? Examples: I had to get beaten up by better guys to get good and the current whitebelts deserve to get smashed too. The upper belts I rolled ...
user avatar
  • 13.7k
12 votes
1 answer
988 views

De-ashi-harai or De-ashi-barai?

I have seen 出足払 ("advancing foot sweep") written two ways by the Kodokan, with the 払 part transcribed as 'harai' (は)1 or 'barai' (ば).2 3 How is the name of this technique pronounced in Japanese? With ...
user avatar
  • 7,292
4 votes
1 answer
207 views

How are armlocks categorised in Judo?

I had always thought that the distinction between ude-garami and ude-hishigi-...-gatame was that the former referred to bent arm figure-four elbow/shoulder locks and the latter referred to armbars (...
user avatar
  • 7,292
5 votes
1 answer
301 views

Is there a canonical resource for the classification of Judo mat techniques?

For throws, I use Toshiro Daigo's book Kodokan Judo Throwing Techniques published by Kodanasha International, Tokyo 2005. It specifically addresses some of the arcane points of Kodokan classification ...
user avatar
  • 13.7k
8 votes
6 answers
582 views

Kiai, the Hara and Dantian (etymology and philosophy)

I'm trying to figure out what, precisely, Kiai means. I've done some reading, and am aware that the Kiai is supposed to come from the Hara, or Dantian - the stomach area. Literally Kiai, means 'join ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
508 views

Difference between wrestling and grappling

Many times, when my sensei teaches me a technique, he takes reference from either wrestling or grappling. I always thought the two are different terms for the same art until the master told me that it'...
user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
626 views

Is there any specific name for a move when a fighter dodges their opponent's punch and counter-punches at the same time?

Another question for move names, sorry. This time I've failed to Google up / Wikipedia up a name for a move when a fighter dodges and counter-strikes at the same time. I know there is such a thing ...
user avatar
  • 219
2 votes
4 answers
161 views

Is there any move (push?) in combat sports that hits an opponent and increases the distance to the opponent, while not throwing them to the ground?

I think pushing an opponent strongly is what I look for? But while Wikipedia has an extensive article about throws, I can find little about pushes wrt combat sports. Maybe pushes are so impractical ...
user avatar
  • 219
5 votes
3 answers
357 views

Sandan meaning in Taekwon do

I found my dad's certificate which says "Sandan" on it. What does that mean? Is it a 3rd degree Black Belt?
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
239 views

standing and crouching posture name in Aikido

I'm trying to remember the specific Japanese name of a common posture/stretch I used and heard of in Aikido during training and warming-up. Basically it was called by our sensei "standing and ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
156 views

What is the name of the postition with the leg retracted (in japanese)?

Recently my karate teacher told us to find out the name of the position (or it might have been the act of retracting your leg after a kick - I can't remember) when you retract your leg after a kick. ...
user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
167 views

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS THAT A DOJO COULD NOT BE CLASSED AS A McDOJO? [duplicate]

If a McDojo conveys an emphasis on commercialism and an assembly line approach to the detriment of 'martial art', what would the signs be of a dojo which would benefit the 'martial arts'. Which dojos ...
user avatar
6 votes
5 answers
4k views

How do you call a practitioner of Tai Chi Chuan (or Kung Fu in general)?

I know that practitioners of Japanese martial arts are called with a -ka ending (e.g. karate ka), but I wouldn't know how to denote a practitioner of Tai Chi Chuan or other Kung Fu styles. I recall ...
user avatar
  • 71
-2 votes
1 answer
243 views

An Ontology of Combat II [duplicate]

I've been thinking about creating an ontology of grappling/martial arts techniques recently. I know there are things like flowcharts for BJJ. Google directed me to this question: An Ontology of ...
user avatar
  • 74
8 votes
2 answers
205 views

What is the name of dynamic, non-resistant form of sparring in Japanese?

I think most of the Judoka know the ladder of Tandoku renshu, Uchi komi, Yakusoku geiko, Randori and Shiai as well as Kata as classical training forms. But in Ne waza, there was another name ...
user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
235 views

What is the name of the side-turn defense in Capoeira?

It's the motion at the 3 second to 4 second mark here where the capoeiristra pivots so that their side faces their opponent and they're sitting back a bit. It's often done before a Queixada, ...
user avatar
18 votes
4 answers
3k views

What are the signs that a dojo could be classed as a McDojo?

McDojo is a portmanteau of the words McDonald's, a famous American fast food chain dojo This conveys a emphasis on commercialism and an assembly line approach to the detriment of martial arts. ...
6 votes
1 answer
289 views

The source of Muay Thai techniques terminology

I guess, a lot of people here are familiar with "Muay Thai - The Art of Fighting" book, or at least with its list of Muay Thai techniques copypasted all over the Muay Thai related web. The list where ...
user avatar
  • 61
2 votes
0 answers
75 views

Why do we say "kiyay" in karate? [duplicate]

In all of the karate styles I have seen that fighters scream loudly by yelling "kiyay" during kumite when they think that they got a point. I am also a karate student and when I joined my karate ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
200 views

What does it mean to be rooted, and how is being rooted different from being balanced?

Being balanced means that your center of mass is supported by your body's structure. How is being rooted different from being balanced?
user avatar
  • 13.7k
-1 votes
1 answer
393 views

What is the difference between a Teacher & an Instructor? [closed]

Although I could answer this question according to my class; In general terms with all forms of martial arts how can we define the difference between them ? ****What else i would like to hear**** ...
user avatar
12 votes
18 answers
9k views

Non-sexist equivalent of "Man up" within the dojo

The common interpretation of the phrase according to the New York Times and urban dictionary and dictionary.com is about living up to a stereotypical image of masculinity. There are other meanings ...
user avatar