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10

I have had the occasion to spar with a national senior champion in karate (the guy is a little over 60). I am 30 years old and reasonnably fit as well, and I have 10+ years of practice of light contact karate (and a few in full contact). I wouldn't have been surprised for the guy to beat me because of superior sense of distance, timing, etc., but to my ...


8

It is also a simple fact of aging. You could look at any sport, and see the same thing. Champions in any sport at extended ages are outliers. Some examples of these outliers would be: Al Oerter - Olympic Champion in track and field, winning medals in events into his mid 40's Gordie Howe - NHL player, played in 5 decades, last game at 52 (All Star electee ...


5

Yes, a trained 60 year-old can outfight an untrained 20 year-old, provided they maintain a healthy body. The average 60 year-old has already lost joint flexibility and mobility, which causes the body to start to become decrepit. A decrepit 60 year-old will always lose, even with training. You should have no illusions that this is easy. You are probably not ...


4

Some interesting replies from people on here. Speaking as someone who works in the medical field and has studied martial arts most of my life I felt I had to add my part on this. If your knees cause you problems then doing a martial art that uses a lot of leg work will exascerbate any problems and could make them worse. It might only be gradual but could ...


4

If you compete in MMA for long enough you will get hurt. Every time you are gambling with your health. If you start competing young you won't get to be good when you are old. Or rather, you may be a good instructor or a good coach but you will never be a good competitor with the damage. If you start competing old, you may struggle to learn the ...


3

Techniques require speed and power (some more than others) Take a technique like a straight punch at range to the face. To land this punch, the attacker need speeds to move across distance to reach the target before defense can be employed. As a younger person, it may be sufficient to increase speed and power to be successful. If you are faster than ...


3

I've been In a similar situation after 13+ years of judo. I'm a fan of more formal training so I choose shotokan karate due mainly to the before mentioned formal part and positions that will improve my my posture, also the kumite is very controlled. Make sure you explain you situation to the instructors and choose a nice dojo. Dojos are a reflexion of the ...


2

I'd like to address the "how to evaluate a school" part of the question from personal experience. Brief context: I fenced foil in my teens, did aikido and wing chun in my 20s. I got osteoarthritis in my knees at age 35 (Dad blamed my dancing, I blamed all the kneeling from Catholic school). For years I couldn't walk without a stick; I even changed ...


2

Although there are many answers, it doesn't seem like your question has been adequately addressed. You list two requirements: kind to my joints (etc.) practical outside the ring (by this I assume you mean you need to defend yourself) I'm going to advocate a two part strategy. Tai Chi training. Gun training. I don't think there is any doubt that Tai Chi ...


2

First, let's talk about your vertigo issue. Vertigo means you lose your balance and can fall down during spells of vertigo. It can be triggered by some types of exercise, but in many cases it comes seemingly at random times. Sometimes it lasts just a few seconds. Other times it can be ongoing for hours or even days. When that happens, you pretty much can't ...


2

I understand where you're coming from. I'm 45. I've had knee problems and back injuries in the past. The knee problems pretty much mean you can't kick, which is what you indicated. You can maybe do low height stomping kicks or anything that doesn't involve "snapping" your kick out really fast like karate or taekwondo would have you do. There are a number ...


2

Martial arts school attendance in general peaks sometime around age 17 or 18. Then it falls off. By the time you reach age 62, you'll be lucky to find even a single competitor. This has to do with the fact that, for most people, their life changes when they head off to college or enter the workforce. They can no longer prioritize martial arts highly. Then ...


2

I'm past that age; I've had brushed with BPV (Benign Postural Vertigo), but training partners have had it worse. Most of my time I spend in Aikido (but we're an aging dojo and we accommodate a variety of physical challenges. Those with BPV don't take falls, ), and practicing Taiji (Tai Chi). Taiji push hands can range from very gentle to very athletic, ...


1

I'm with Steve on this matter (nice post btw). The only thing I might add is Aikido as it is (especially in beginning stages) a more slow and fluent way of martial arts. But as for the vertigo you might have to consider the fact that there will be some falling involved. I'm practicing traditional Japanese Jiu-Jitsu and it's not that physically demanding as ...


1

Usually I would recommend BJJ for a low impact MA (due to there being no strikes), but if you have lower back issues that would be a bad idea. Plus it sounds like you have a lot of fun striking. It sounds like you're a prime candidate for cardio kickboxing. You won't advance in belt levels, but you're also not going to be sparring or expected to throw ...


1

Ving tsun, wing chun, are easy one the legs, it's mostly close range hand techniques. Not as much pushing and pulling and jumping as other arts. The idea is to immobilize fast. Simultaneously as you defend you attack with speed. The first form builds strong tendons and joint in the arms. Speed comes with practice. The leg techniques are effective and ...


1

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu my friend! A lot of people who get injuries from Judo go into BJJ as it's a lot softer on the joints as opposed to other martial arts such as Thai Boxing. It is also effective as opposed to pointless martial arts based on forms such as Karate or TKD that don't encourage sparring against a live opponent.


1

Tai chi would typically be an ideal art for older people, but finding someone that really knows the martial aspects of the art today is darn near impossible. Any of the softer more internal martial arts of the gung-fu family would certainly work as there are special techniques in gung-fu known as handicapped fighting which is helpful for those with ...


1

I agree with dandellion, but I can't add a comment under his post (or upvote it) since I haven't built up enough reputation points yet. Berin says he (I'm assuming. please correct me if I'm wrong) that he doesn't want to practice an internal art. I would challenge this statement by saying that it's a more-than-effective martial art in terms of practicality,...


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