Hot answers tagged

17

Yes, but... (and it's a big "but") Two things stimulate bone density: Damage Generally our biological systems are set up so that if something is damaged, cells lay down more, tougher material since clearly what we had before wasn't quite tough enough. In other tissues, this forms as scar tissue which can reduce your mobility, however bone just gives ...


14

Pretend chokes The video is of a lame, contrived demo. The "choke" in it is not performed effectively. It's a farce of a choke. The reason this strutting bodybuilder is "immune" to the choke is that it's not a legitimate choke in the first place. If you know someone who thinks they can't be choked, I think Marcelo Garcia would be interested in testing that ...


12

According to forensic science it is pressure applied to the carotids and not the veins that causes loss of consciousness, although pressure on the veins leaves specific signs of strangulation when they bust, but are not a cause of death or unconsciousness. (pg. 297, 14.2 Strangulation, see section #2 re: carotid compression). Although the deeper carotid ...


10

Subjective experience report incoming: It very much depends on the quality of the application and the strength ratios. The better the technique is applied and the stronger my opponent in relation to my choke resistance training is, the faster it will end. I can have students choking me at full strength without fading out just by resisting through neck ...


9

Philip Klöcking has done a good job covering what the person being choked experiences. I will try to cover other considerations. In my experience, feeling pain is largely separated from whether a choke successfully cuts off blood flow. Pain will usually cause people to tap even when the blood choke is not that effective. You can also choke such that the ...


9

This has nothing to do with wiring; we are, essentially, all wired the same way (ignoring, of course, the outliers: e.g. people with an improperly developed nervous system [CIPA - Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis]). There are, however, various reasons you might have different effects on different people: Muscle Mass – While this is not a ...


8

Welcome to the scary world of real human anatomy. What you read in an anatomy book is the average location of things - but actual people can have significant variation in specific location. For example, the sciatic nerve can run over, under, or through the piriformis muscle - it all depends on how your body randomly grows. Likewise, you can have ...


8

Yes, hitting objects does make your bones more solid. Bones are primarily made up of two parts, and outer layer and an inner layer. The outer is a thin layer of compact bone (cortical bone). The inner layer is far less compact and is known as spongy or cancellous bone. The thin layer provides up to 80% of the strength of the bone despite covering a much ...


8

Yes, omoplatas are considered a variant of ashi-gatame or hiza-gatame.1 3 The IJF Referee Commission has confirmed their legality on multiple occasions,1 2 both as a submission, and as a method of turning uke over from the turtle position: Lascau: Osaekomi. Demonstrator: *uke taps, tori points at armlock* Lascau: Ippon. Ippon. ...


7

What I've picked up over the years about how blood chokes actually work - and I could be wrong - is this: There's a nerve in the neck called the Vagus nerve. One of its many functions is to sense blood pressure of the arteries in the neck. When you compress those arteries, it will cause blood pressure to increase rapidly. The Vagus nerve senses it and ...


7

I'm not entirely sure this question is serious, but what the heck. :) I've known female classmates in styles like Taekwondo and Kung-fu. They generally said that getting punched in the breast was annoying, because it's a sensitive part of the body. They did not quit because of it. Many men, when sparring with women, will deliberately avoid punching or ...


6

I'll focus my answer on why you want to do that, and if it's an effective/safe way to achieve the goals that you are truly seeking (because even if you can increase your bone density, this does not necessarily mean that you achieve the goal you want). I'll work with 3 scenarios: I want to hit my opponent harder I want to feel less pain I want to prevent ...


5

No, you cannot be immune. IMHO even training to "resist" it is stupid, completely stupid. If someone is choking you out, he WILL succeed, even if you resist for 5 seconds longer. Air choking is easier to notice ( ... you can't breathe) and fighting against your opponent's hold is a lot easier. It will help endure it, allow you to take little bit of air ...


5

The following study (on hadaka-jime and nami-juji-jime) supports the claim that compression of the carotid (and vertebral) arteries is associated with loss of consciousness in judo-style chokes: By means of continuous wave doppler the effect of two choke holds (Carotid sleeper, Nami-juji-jime) on the carotid and vertebral arteries was investigated. For ...


5

What is an "elbow-lock"? While a common misconception, armlocks which cause pain to the shoulder are not inherently illegal in Judo. The phrasing "kansetsu-waza applied to the elbow joint" is used by the Kodokan to describe joint-locks which achieve their effect by: straightening or bending the elbow joint ("locking" it in place), and stretching, bending, ...


5

Kicking is more than just strength. There's speed also. Combining both gives you power. But since you asked just about the strength aspect, that's what I'll respond to. With barbells or dumbbells: Deadlift, Squat, Bulgarian Split Squats, Lunges, Step-Ups. That works the entire muscle stack. Of those, the Split Squats are probably your best bet. Without ...


4

While "reliably" may be disputable, the main means to make the bent-arm variant (from mune-gatame, i.e. not the classic kimura with uke's wrist behind her back, although the principles mostly apply) work on the elbow is torque: First, pull the arm (elbow and wrist) as close to yourself (uke's hip and shoulder respectively) as possible. This indeed is the "...


4

Yes, there is. Ude garami is a commonly misunderstood technique. Mainly because most people in western countries get taught that it has to be performed with uke's arm being bent. There is even a mistranslation in German where its called Armbeugehebel ("arm bend lever"), making this even more confusing. This is likely the case in other languages as well. In ...


4

I've found that the same exercises that basketball players use to improve their jump shots are very effective. Explosive power You tend to want explosive power. Most of what we do is kick fast (not just repetitions, but a single kick itself needs to be fast). We need to build fast twitch muscles, that aids in fast contracting of the muscles needed for ...


4

It is common for Shifus to have knowledge of TCM theory. It is also common for them to explain TCM theory to students. However, it is equally common for Shifus to withhold such information. Such information may be deemed the province of closed-door disciples, not for disclosing to normal students. For better or worse, CMA has a tradition that most ...


4

would they actually be able to fight? What is going to stop them? Among other things, fighters can be male, female, young, old, short, fat, skinny, tall, missing limbs, or blind. You cannot tell who can fight just by looking at someone's body. Wouldn't back pain and balance be a problem? Two things: Back pain and balance are problems in the same way ...


3

I took the question "What happens to a person being choked" a bit more physiologically. From what I understand (from a 'straight dope' posting almost 20 years ago), a properly applied "blood choke" (as opposed to an "air choke), fools the body's defense mechanism into thinking that the brain is suddenly receiving a spike in blood pressure - which can be ...


3

When a choke is properly applied, no amount of "neck flexing" will save you. Let's use a rear naked choke for example. The attacker is behind the victim. The choking arm forms a 'V' shape at the front of the neck with the elbow pointing down. This is to target the carotid arteries. Closing one of the arteries will not completely stop blood flow to the brain....


3

While these are not technically ude-garami according to Kodokan classification (since they do not use a figure-four grip), similar techniques in Judo can be applied to cause pain to a bent elbow-joint more directly than the kata forms of ude-garami.1 The mechanics of these kansetsu-waza is to "lock" the upper arm in a fixed position against your own body (...


3

Joints This one is easy. Yes, your martial arts instruction should cover joints extensively. This includes things like the use of joints, the training of joints, striking with joints, striking at joints, the protection of joints, and health maintenance of joints. But this is not something I would call theory; there is very little abstraction when talking ...


3

Well it seems I might be the only one who thinks this is mostly a myth. I'm open to the possibility that bone density can be changed by beating against the bone or breaking the bone, but I'll require citations for that from scientific sources first. I wrote about this particular issue in my answer to the broader question of: Arm Toughening Without Losing ...


3

Everyone is different. It is important to realize that things like this is usually ON AVERAGE. Such as 98.6 is the AVERAGE temperature for a human but it doesn't mean someone is necessarily sick if their temperature is off from this. Everyone has their own tolerance for pain or it may just turn out to not be a painful spot for them. I would expect ...


3

Interesting question... I didn't really give this enough thought before, so I'll relate it to martial arts by way of kobujutsu taisabaki to keep it on topic. Standing, and thus stance (kamae) in kobujutsu, is a vital aspect of proper positioning relative to the opponent. Asayama Ichiden-ryu, Masaki-ryu, Kukishin-ryu, Yagyu Shingan-ryu all stress the ...


2

Depending on your definition of "immunity", some people do indeed appear to be more resistant to chokeholds than others. In the study Mechanism of loss of consciousness during vascular neck restraint, Journal of Applied Physiology (2012), a rear-naked choke hold was applied to 24 participants until they passed out, submitted, or 23 seconds had passed: 16/...


2

No! This is a ridiculous question. No one is immune to being choked in the same way no is immune to having their arm broke.


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