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I've studied Yang style Tai Chi for two years. There are some very simple applications for Single Whip: In the images above, the guy is facing forwards, imagine if the attacker was coming from behind. You start in Wu Chi and when they try to punch the back of your head, you step backwards into single whip, using the whip hand to very subtly deflect the ...


4

Kukkiwon has no official Bunkai (Boonhae in Korean). So I would say that this is a dangerous road to go down, trying to assign Boonhae to a system that specifically wasn't mean to have it. People doing this are guessing after the fact (and a lot of the founders have said there is no hidden meaning to the moves intended). Now, the previous martial arts that ...


3

I think other people will be able to provide better answers, as most of my experience is in other styles, but this poster, which has been on the walls of almost every Karate-based school I've ever attended, gives a list of targets for the knifehand. (click to enlarge) Namely, they match the knifehand with: inner forearm inside and outside elbow side of ...


3

Who else landed here trying to see the practicality of Kitana's fan in Mortal Kombat? Tessen-jutsu is actually a Japanese art. In essence the war fan is a "Club" when folded and a catchment system for blades when closing. Strike the wrist bone or between the ulna and radius, near pressure points Divert the attacker's weapon, and drive the fan ...


2

Contemporary wushu focuses on performance. Traditional wushu focuses on self-defense theory and application (or at least it should). So in contemporary wushu, every movement is "flashy" to improve its appearance and level of difficulty. While the techniques themselves are taken from traditional wushu, the emphasis is on getting more air, more ...


2

I’m going to focus on the applications that any trained martial artist with a little weapons training can execute, beginning with the finishing moves. Bamboo wushu fans are more than sufficient. Striking with the butt of the fan into the solar plexus or kidneys These strikes are very similar to how one uses a kubotan, and can end a conflict if applied well....


2

My instructor taught us the historical application (as the move is done in the Yang 24 step) is rooted in the fact that soldiers used to carry a dagger on their right hip. By this interpretation, the move brings the right hand to the hip, grabs the knife, raises it, and brings it down on top of the opponent. EDIT: By request, a video showing the move as done ...


1

This is how it was taught in my school, where it was always the first application taught. Ward-off is to get the leading arm under the opponent's upper arm, and make forearm-to-forearm contact with that same arm with your off-arm. Rollback is used to turn the shoulder in a lock, controlling the elbow, to "drag" the opponent towards you down and to ...


1

Bladed Fan There are a number of strikes in forms that likely only work with a bladed fan, which is an unlikely real-world weapon, but I'm going to list them to give people an idea of how something that looks so pretty as a fan form is actually as vicious as it gets. The blades are probably leaf-shaped like some throwing daggers (I've seen a picture ...


1

Practitioners of traditional wushu, as a modern person would interpret this term, probably do not call what they practice traditional wushu but something more specific. Traditional wushu is basically a catch-all category for Chinese martial arts that are not contemporary wushu. Traditional Traditional martial arts were suppressed in Communist China during ...


1

The wrapping motion and the crossing of forearms preparatory to blocking in karate and ITF TaeKwon-Do have the SAME purpose. They are flinch responses. They are our natural responses to threats. Those responses come in many forms but two are very common. In those two responses we may either(a) wrap our arms about ourselves as a shield or we may (b) raise ...


1

It seems a lot of myths are being perpetuated here. Many answers are correct - but in martial context can only apply to a greeting as might be done when entering or exiting the kwoon, or greeting Sifu. But as to Japanese kata, the context of the question, and also Korean poomsae/hyung, the covered fist has absolutely nothing to do with greetings, war and ...


1

This hand posture is also found associated with the sho chiku bai (pine, bamboo, plum) formations as seen at this link: http://www.skski.net/sho-chiku-bai-mon.html. More details about that can be found there, as well. In Morihei Ueshiba's book on aikido talks about the sho chiku bai throughout its pages, but doesn't discuss the hand postures: http://www....


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