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7

The FBI compiles some data but not as fine-grained as you want. Beyond that I think you're SOL other than looking at guesses. My favorite such nonscientific approach is the "HAPV" (Habitual Acts of Physical Violence) idea formulated by Patrick McCarthy. He seems to describe things accurately in my judgment. That is to say, he alleges that the most common ...


5

Defense is harder than offense because reaction is slower than action. You have to see and recognize the movement, your brain has to process a response, and then you have to respond. So, there is a limit to how fast your responses can get compared to attacks, even with improvement. You can improve your speed by seeing enough attacks come in from the same ...


3

I think either you or your self-defense instructor are misunderstanding something. If your instructor thinks it's too dangerous to take more than one class with him because of the possibility that you might learn something and try to use it for real, then it's the same as him saying that you should not learn anything from his classes. What kind of a teacher ...


2

I assume, though it's not clear from your question, that some of the other classes are for law enforcement and/or security officials. It would explain why he's not allowed to teach it to you. It's essentially for the same reason that citizens aren't allowed to own fully automatic firearms or certain types of ammunition: The government decided it's off-limits ...


2

You should get some clarification from your instructor, but my guess would be that this is a policy of the school and not necessarily anything about a legal reason. If this is a college or university, they may have weird arcane policies built up based on their own liability and insurance needs. This may also have to do with avoiding getting sued if a ...


2

"Closing the gap" unexpectedly is one of the major tactics in fighting, and with good timing can allow you to land a devastating attack even as the opponent attempts to hit you. You can potentially stayed clear of the business end of a weapon attack. There are several footwork patterns I feel are particularly important for this, each with different uses: ...


1

In my experience, maneuvers that require a switch in stance can generate a lot of energy by utilizing the rotational muscles in the legs and core. Leading a switch maneuver in to an attack like a straight punch, cross, elbow, hook or a round house kick will further generate more energy. I have spent a lot of time training the concept and I've arrived at a ...


1

Craig Pumphrey's brick breaking ram technique is very impressive, and definitely utilize many muscles to create impact. Also, it can be used to break a wall.


1

You're probably looking for chapéu de couro in Capoeira. It's a Roundhouse Kick from sitting position. I'll try to describe it, but I'll link you a video as well. You start in a position with 1 foot on the ground, your other leg stretch leaning on the heel. The side of the leg that is stretched has your hand on the ground next to your body. From there you ...


1

No. Appearances do not determine who wins (does not fail) in a fight. There are other factors including speed, bravery, cunning, and deception that may determine the outcome. A famous story where the apparent stronger (rugged with strong voice) fighter loses is the Biblical story of David and Goliath. Goliath is the much larger and stronger individual, but ...


1

I answered a question that was similar to this before, which you might want to read: Close quarter's defense: when you stand face to face with an attacker That answer deals with an aggressor who attempts to stand face to face with you, violating your personal space but not actually throwing the first punch. A situation like that is best seen through ...


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