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13

One of my favorite exercises in that area is holding a side kick against the wall. You execute a side kick with your foot against the wall, and then you shift your weight forward until your foot no longer slides down. This will only work if you hold your leg at least in a horizontal line. Once you have some balance you can work on height. If you get your ...


10

Improve your leg Strength. Do this first because it feeds into any activity requiring balance. Try: Hindu squats. These are great because they have you coming up on the ball of your foot while squatting low. Dynamic/Plyometric squats. For example, box-jumping. It's simple, just get a crate or some of those stackable aerobics platforms. Squat and jump ...


9

If you are 75 kg, then you should not have a problem throwing an opponent who is 102 kg with a basic hip throw. The major hip throw (ogoshi) is the first hip throw in the judo curriculum. It's simplest to start with throwing ogoshi slowly because ogoshi has the nice property that you can stop mid-throw. It's easiest to understand the mechanics while ...


7

A fun way to work on balance (and endurance) is to stand in your kick stance, and draw out the alphabet with your kicking leg. This doesn't really work your actual kicking technique much, but it will work your balance and your endurance and strengthen all the muscels needed for kicking, and therefor your balance and technique will improve.


7

You've given us a one word diagnosis - "stiff" - but with only that it's hard to guess what your instructor means. If you're confused by the description, then whatever you're doing wrong is probably relatively subtle. It's at least as likely to be attitudinal (i.e. your mental focus, as in trying to hit too hard, or "clenching" for too long, or rushing too ...


7

I'm not entirely sure this question is serious, but what the heck. :) I've known female classmates in styles like Taekwondo and Kung-fu. They generally said that getting punched in the breast was annoying, because it's a sensitive part of the body. They did not quit because of it. Many men, when sparring with women, will deliberately avoid punching or ...


6

A simple practical exercise that will improve your kicking balance: Do straight leg kicks without ever setting the kicking leg down. You don't have to do them aggressively or high at first. Even a 30 or 45 degree kick is sufficient to start you off. But when the leg returns, either don't set it down, or do the lightest toe-touch possible. Gentle, ...


5

I have vague memories of simply trying various kicks in slow-motion, trying to keep my balance, until I could do most of them without losing my balance. Alternatively, try to just lift one foot off the ground from a "feet together" standing position. The foot only needs to be lifted until it's no longer touching the ground. Try to keep your balance. After a ...


5

When talking to people about this specific problem in class, I usually surprise them with my comment: "stop standing on your heel." If you are light on your heel but strong on the ball of your foot you have several advantages: You are using your calf muscles. They're very strong and confidence inspiring. You have less rotational friction than a planted ...


5

I do: Increase your arms and torso Strength. Work on your wrists. Strength and flexibility. You have to increase your body constrictive Strength. (to keep your body hard, independant of the position. Find out your balance point while upside down. During a handstand, Try to push the ground and at the same time do not let your gravity center to raise. Work ...


4

From what you describe, it sounds like the problem you have is maintaining your balance using other parts of your body other than your arms. While your arms and hands will bear the weight while in a handstand, you should also focus on using your core strength (abs and back) to hold yourself up. The idea is similar to standing up straight on your feet and ...


4

Slow kicks and slow leg raises. Balance is a feedback game - your proprioception and your muscle response. How fast you can sense your own balance, and how fast you can get your stabilizers to do the necessary micro adjustments in firing the correct muscles. When you balance or stabilize, it's not like your body turns on ALL of the stabilizers at once - ...


4

zhan zhuang or stand like a post. (the article is rather terse, but the references at the bottom will probably be helpful. I'm not sure this is a skill I'd want to learn from the internet, but any practitioner of Chinese martial arts should be able to help you with the basics. You need to improve your stabilizers - the muscles that surround your ankles ...


4

It can be very hard to impossible to willingly off-balance an (maybe sub-conciously) uncooperative, stronger opponent, i.e. to have enough kuzushi. That is where Judo (in the very sense of the expression) begins. And as Judo is Jujitsu specialized on throwing (among other things), I will answer purely in this context. I personally had the experience with a ...


4

I'm not an expert, but there's a discussion on weight distribution here that suggests that the weight should be balanced uniformly. Keep the center of the feet (Yongquan points) lifted lightly and place your body weight exactly onto the center of your feet. .... Actually, you open the Yongquan point by grasping a very little the ground with the toes. ...


4

would they actually be able to fight? What is going to stop them? Among other things, fighters can be male, female, young, old, short, fat, skinny, tall, missing limbs, or blind. You cannot tell who can fight just by looking at someone's body. Wouldn't back pain and balance be a problem? Two things: Back pain and balance are problems in the same way ...


3

Basic Your knees should be bent, and your weight centered over the arch of your foot, which is near the center. This places weight on both the ball and heel of the foot. One goal of zhan zhuang is to eliminate unnecessary muscular tension used to hold your body up. Although you may feel strain in your lower leg for some weeks or months, this is not a long ...


3

"Leaning out of axis" is, in my mind, a combination of three separate ideas. It's not clear to me how your idea relates to mine, so here are all of the elements as I understand them: Balance Your center of mass is supported by your base. Alignment The relative positions of your body parts are conducive to applying/resisting force. Verticality Your back is ...


3

Mentally, take a step back and think about what your performance of these techniques is like. If "poor balance" were specific to a kick or two I'd be worried about flexibility, but if it's pervasive through kata then it sounds like your mental focus and attitude to the technique is wrong. Think more about clean, minimal, precise movement, with the body ...


3

Everyone is talking about strength… good but unnecessary. It is good to have strong arms—and I am pretty sure you already do—to hold you up upside-down. But if you have the wrong technique, strength will always fail. If not, how does water continually seep into rocks when rocks have spent all their evolution perfecting the art of hardness? The key/idea ...


3

Coming from a taekwondo background, I see a lot of balance issues come from "banana" alignment. When you strike with your back-kick (or more commonly, side-kick), you want your body to be in a straight line from heel through your hips to your head, but it's very common for people to lean forwards to look around their body, which will lead to over-balancing ...


3

If training with a sensei is not an option at the moment, understand that it limits both your knowledge and what it takes to self-correct. A trained eye can see where you are having issues. Since that has been harped on with just about every answer, I'll move on to the technique. Use a Heavy Bag Keep in mind that there is a huge difference between ...


3

I would suggest doing kicks or your kata with a blindfold. This is usually much more difficult for older people as well, so if you are taking up the sport as an adult it can be very challenging and you'll get a few laughs out of it too!


3

Some techniques to improve balance include getting into a horse or front bow stance, slowly go through all of your kicks 10x, bringing the leg up to chamber, turning between 90-180 degrees slowly, extending your kick, turning back to the original position, then down to the original stance. Once you can do each kick up to 10x without losing your balance, you'...


2

I hate to say it, but you probably do need to train with a coach to show you why you are pushing your weight off centre. For a straight kick, you should be pushing through your centre of mass to your anchor foot - it sounds like you are aiming incorrectly, or possibly twisting your body incorrectly, but it would need someone to watch you to help you correct ...


2

In the book Martial Artists Book of Yoga by Lily Chou, she suggests using Half Moon Pose to help with balance and execution of a sidekick. Any stance where you're on one leg can help you learn balance, but in Half Moon your core is horizontal, plus you're really stretching and extending your limbs which requires even more balance, and seems to increase the ...


2

The best option would be to ask your instructor to watch what you do with both the opponents you mention in your post. He will be able to check that you're doing the technique correctly and if you're doing it differently for the two opponents. Alternatively (and if you're allowed to) have someone video you performing the technique on both opponents and see ...


2

1) Ginga a lot. 2) Do variations: Slow Fast Very low Very stiff Let your chest nearly touch your knees while doing the Ginga Switch directions Stop and reverse in mid-movement Do esquivas/cocorinhas while doing the Ginga 3) Strength training: Kettle-bell swings Squats Kneeling Squat Jumps


1

Being rooted means you can absorb/resist some force without moving. A dancer can be balanced on pointe, but this is not a good stance for rooting because they are easily unbalanced. Balance is necessary but not sufficient to be rooted. Fighting stances will have the feet separated and knees bent to help absorb force. But this is not the end of the story. ...


1

Do the ginga for one hour straight non-stop and your body will adapt to it and you will develop your style. That is an old trick passed down to me by my master and also been advised by students who have visited brazil for capoeira training.


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