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18

It is, and it takes a LONG time to reach. If you ever reach your 9th Dan, you are awarded a red belt to wear. The white-red belt is awarded at 6th Dan. At this stage, you need to wait for 8 to 10 years between each test, and it's not automatically given to you; the federation will only give the highest Dan to people who actually have an impact on judo as a ...


18

Your kyu rank is relative to the style (and dojo) that you practiced at when you were 15. Realistically, no matter what the style 9th kyu is barely more than beginner. I'd suggest you start again from white belt (whatever kyu that happens to be in the dojo you'll be attending). If you remember stuff then you should be able to advance fairly quickly. I've ...


14

There's no way for us to know the relevant factors here: your dojo's rules and culture, your instructor's opinion, whether she considers you to have some sort of power position over her. But if you're both in school, know each other outside of the dojo, and you don't teach her, it sounds fine.


13

Most Brazilian Jiujitsu schools do have children's ranks which automatically get turned into adult ranks when they turn 16. So a children's orange belt will become an adult's blue belt automatically at age 16. A children's green belt will automatically become an adult's purple belt at age 16. This is usually how it's done, but a teacher might decide to award ...


12

First, bear in mind that this will differ from dojang to dojang. Depending on your association (WTF or ITA for example) there may be a list of techniques you will have to master for each belt. If you are not affiliated with an association, your teacher will have a checklist of things he wants you to learn before each belt. Ask your teacher what the ...


10

The requirements for blue belt vary from school to school. What is required at Roy Harris' academy is not what is required at Renzo Gracie's, Marcelo Garcia's, and so on. The Straight Blast Gym had a good article about how to view the goals of each belt progression. Here's the section on going from white to blue: White to Blue: The journey of white ...


10

Sounds fine to me. The kid was told exactly what would happen if he disobeyed his instructor one more time. In fact, had the instructor not followed through on his threat to take away his belt, the kid would have learned that his instructor makes hollow threats, and that would invite even more insubordination. There's a reason for this harshness. At 12 ...


10

Firstly, whatever you learned fifteen years ago might be muddled by age and memory lose. I would not rely on it. Secondly, since it was a child's rank and not adult, the syllabus might have been radically different. Finally, after any long break period, it is advisable to start again as a beginner. If it all comes back, you can wear your old coloured belt. ...


9

Roosevelt's Judo experience Roosevelt trained judo under two instructors (John O'Brien, and Yoshiaki Yamashita) for a period of around a few months each in 1902 and 1904. He maintained an interest in the art after this, corresponding and reading on it, and may have continued to sporadically train with wrestling partners, but by his own autobiography's ...


9

A third degree brown belt is the lowest level of brown belt, not the highest, and is thus the furthest from black belt. A black belt does also not denote an understanding of all the tenets of judo. A third-degree brown belt means that you're not a total novice to the art. Sometimes it means even less. Teddy Roosevelt was a tough guy who liked many combat ...


9

In ITF Taekwon-do, the coloured belts are numbered from 10th kup (also gup) to 1st kup. Black belt grades are numbered from 1st degree (also dan) to 9th degree. In the organisation I'm a member of (P.U.M.A, in the UK), the colours used are: 10th: White 9th: Yellow stripe 8th: Yellow 7th: Green stripe 6th: Green 5th: Blue stripe 4th: Blue 3rd: Red stripe ...


9

Special thanks to @JohnP and @Fuzzyboots for an interesting discussion in the chat (Link to the Open Roda discussion). The answer is, for me anyway, is IF there is any doubt that your child is not receiving all he/she can from a Taekwondo school, pull them out and send them to another school. Do not get caught up in the titles, belt levels etc. Do what is ...


8

I agree with the other answers about the technique varying, but wanted to add one more: Time and dedication. We like to say that a "black belt is a white belt who didn't quit" (this is not unique to us, it's a fairly common expression). We also talk about how when a new person enters the dojang it is impossible to tell if they will be one of the ones who ...


8

Yes, this is normal although not common. Grading are set to determine if the examinee has a certain skill set appropriate for said grade. If they have, they should pass. If not, they should fail1. Most, if not all, syllabus have a recommended time between gradings. That time is a general on average most students will be able to learn the skills for the ...


8

Judo has rank requirements that include competition record, skills demonstration, time in rank, minimum age, service, etc. The specific requirements are dictated by a judoka's governing organization, and these requirements will not necessarily match, which is why a judoka's recognized rank may differ depending on the considering organization. For example, ...


8

Whilst it is of course possible and I agree with much of @Wigwam's answer. I think it is important to look at the benefits of the gradings themselves: dealing with pressure - you will be put under pressure at a grading, which of course is scary the first few times, but as you get used to this pressure you deal with it better, allowing you to deal with ...


8

For this question there is only one person to ask: Your trainer(s). Is it okay for them or not? If it is okay for them, always have a normal belt, just in case you do classes or training somewhere else. P.S. Have a look at the class. Do they all wear traditional white gis and plain belts, some kids maybe striped belts? Then the answer will be rather ...


7

The image above can be found on the website of the Kodokan. It shows three holders of the 10th dan with their red belts as demonstrated per the image capture on the website, which reads: Ichiro ABE, 10th Dan | Yoshimi OSAWA, 10th Dan | Toshiro DAIGO, 10th Dan I guess this settles it with an appropriately authoritative source.


7

Smartass Answer Here: TKD Belts Serious Answer Depends on the school/association. Some have over 10 colored belts before you even get to first degree black. Some have much fewer. An example: White Yellow 1st and 2nd Degree Green 1st and 2nd Degree Blue 1st and 2nd Degree Brown Black 1st Degree through 9th or 10th The fewer belts the school has, the ...


7

Traditional Kung Fu doesn't have colored sashes, as they traditionally had the sole purpose of holding up the pants. For the most part, colored sashes are a Japanification of the ranking systems. Rank in traditional Kung Fu also doesn't follow the same general pattern as Japanese arts either, as titles are familial based, not rank based (sidi = younger ...


7

Martial Arts Traditions Vary First, there's no universal structure for all martial arts. Different styles, different schools, different teachers within the same style, might have different ranks, or no ranking system at all. (Wikipedia on martial arts grandmasters) Common Traditions Many styles (but not all, maybe not most, when you look at things ...


7

I talk about this in more detail in my answer here: What Brazilian Jiu Jitsu belt ranking at age 16 after 11 yrs experience? The answer is that most BJJ schools will automatically convert (without need for a test) your children's rank into an adult rank when you reach 16 years old. But as my answer in the link above suggests, the adult rank you actually ...


7

Is it possible? Well, we can send a man to the moon and bring him back alive, so it stands to reason that it is possible for you to stay at white until you're ready to test for black belt. Some styles do this as a matter of pracitice anyway - Aikido is notable for this. But is it recommended? That's not so easy to answer: Understand that the purpose of ...


7

There's a pretty big contradiction in your question. You are not interested in belts, but you want to have a black belt. So which is it? If you aren't interested in belts you shouldn't be interested in the black one either. You could find a school/martial art that works without belt systems or you could not care about your belt at all. Personally, belt ...


7

People actually sell belts that have been distressed, especially black belts that have their color faded so much that they can almost pass for a dirty white belt. Many martial artists distress their belts themselves as soon as they get them. There are recipes for doing this online. While this is done on purpose nowadays, in the past it was just something ...


7

You may be considering one aspect of the story of the match between Helio and Masahiko Kimura. Kimura identified Helio as being a 6th dan in Judo in his biography and some accounts describe it as him having accorded that rank after the match. Robert Hill, in his book, World of Martial Arts, states that Helio's official ranking was only 3rd dan, but also ...


6

When I tested for 1st Dan, I was asked to perform Gae Baek, which is the blackbelt pattern (kata for all the karate philistines - JK). In addition to that, I was asked to perform two additional colour belt patterns at random. In my case, Won Hyu and Hwaorang. Then came the demonstration of breaking techniques. I was allowed to choose my own technique and ...


6

This is an inspiring article about belt rankings. http://www.minrec.org/wilson/pdfs/History%20of%20Belts%20and%20Ranks.pdf Speculative tradition proposes that belt colors (as indicators of rank) originated in a peculiar habit of washing all of one’s training clothes except the cloth belt. Thus as training progressed the initially white belt would ...


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